William H. Townsend ‎– The Lion of Whitehall: Cassius Marcellus Clay

Label:
Americana House ‎– 14897/14898/14899/14900
Format:
2 × Vinyl, LP, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
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Tracklist

Address To The Civil War Round Table By William H. Townsend, October 17, 1952
Side 1 Address To The Civil War Round Table By William H. Townsend, October 17, 1952
Side 2 Address To The Civil War Round Table By William H. Townsend, October 17, 1952
Side 3 Address To The Civil War Round Table By William H. Townsend, October 17, 1952
Side 4 Address To The Civil War Round Table By William H. Townsend, October 17, 1952

Credits

Notes

Cover is paper envelope with stamp on front that reads:

MORRIS BOOK SHOP
110 Walnut St.
Lexington, KY

Never seen something like this before, each side has its own catalog number, and for some reason side 1/4 is on one disc and side 2/3 is on the other disc so:

Side 1: Cat #14897 - disc 1
Side 2: Cat #14898 - disc 2
Side 3: Cat #14899 - disc 2
Side 4: Cat #14900 - disc 1

Some other versions are on red vinyl.

Vintage Radio Interview Recording from 1952.

William H. Townsend (1890-1964) was an author, lawyer, Lincoln scholar, speaker, and lifelong president of the Kentucky Civil War Round Table. A lifetime defender of the downtrodden, Townsend always had a clear idea of right and wrong, and would staunchly defend his position, even in the face of extreme opposition. He could also spin a rich tale, and often said that he would "never let the truth get in the way of a good story."

One of Townsend's greatest joys was speaking about Kentucky legend Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903). A fiery mix of brains, temper and nerve, Clay was born into a slave-owning family and spent his lifetime opposing slavery and working for its end. Clay was also a lawyer, duelist, publisher, and a Lincoln appointee as ambassador to Russia. Highly skilled with a knife, Clay's famous pearl-handled Bowie knife was still with him, under his pillow, even as he exhaled his last breath.

Here is Townsend's famous address on Clay before a meeting of the Civil War Round Table in Chicago during the fall of 1952. Recorded without his prior knowledge, this lecture has been widely acclaimed for its droll humor, satire, and historical value. This has been called one of the greatest addresses of the 20th century.

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