Mixman-LFC

Underworld Mixman-LFC

March 22, 2019
i guess u aint got a clue about music mate and never will
HerbieDerHerbmeister

Underworld HerbieDerHerbmeister

February 28, 2018
edited about 1 year ago
Wikipedia lists some versions of Underworld singles that are not on here (Discogs).
(Complete with record label, cat.nr, etc.).
Should they be added to Discogs?
I'll be happy to do so. Just thought I should ask first.
dj_jasonb

Underworld dj_jasonb

February 23, 2019
If you do not own said releases then no. Only add release that you actually own / are in possession of.
seehaas

Underworld seehaas

March 2, 2018
You should only enter records in Discogs that you have in your hands when entering RSG §1.1.1.
Rich.C

Underworld Rich.C

January 5, 2017
With a groundbreaking sound that obliterates the dividing lines between Techno, Trance and Breakbeat stylings, Underworld bury a subtle Indie Rock attitude slightly beneath the textural surface of their blissful synthetic insanity. With the drop of each new release, this U.K. sensation proves their worthiness as one of the most innovative and important dance fusion acts of the 1990s. Accredited as heavy hitters in the struggle to bring dance music to the attention of the mainstream, electronica darlings Underworld continue to draw an impressive fanbase on both the international club scene and the airwaves with their widely influential style that blends electronic intricacy with king-size, floor-friendly grooves.
Electrohound

Underworld Electrohound

June 6, 2016
edited over 2 years ago
Underworld are clearly masters of their craft. Even so, it's important to correct some misperceptions about them, since it seems some techno fans, even paid critics, don't appreciate the full range of their output. Some of this is to be expected. Some just think of them as that rock-dance act that did that "Born Slippy" thing. Hmmm.

First off, for cats who love to write them off simply because they do have a vocal, lyrical and guitar dimension to their music, perhaps one should consider that limiting the definition of techno music or electronic music not only is backwards (both Kraftwerk and Juan Atkins used vocals and the electric guitar was essentially one of the first synthesizers), but it also narrows music's creative possibilities.

But if that is not enough for you to reconsider or expand your mind, then at minimum, you should know your history. And if you listened to the ORIGINAL instrumental breakbeat version of "Born Slippy," the ambient tidal groove of "Thing In A Book," the ode to joy of "Rez," the bubbling "Peach Tree," the crashing "Kittens," the scratch static of "Rowla," or the cosmic lightning of "Cherry Pie" -- all pure electronic instrumentals -- and you still think they're whack, then my assessment is you're simply hating to hate.

If you're open beyond this more instrumental side of Underworld, then the rewards just grow. You have the echoey groove of "Dirty Guitar," the demon genie of "Spoonman," the electro hoedown of "Cowgirl," the Art of Noise house of "Eclipse," the ecstatic "Spikee," the warping "Juanita," the time elastic "Pearls Girl," the electro blues of "Mosaic," the dark trance of "Burts" and "Dark Train," the weirdly hypnotic "Luetin," the moody ride of "Bird 1," the skittering boogie of "Best Mamgu Ever," the Blade Runner sunset of "Beautiful Burnout," the human soul blooming in a robot brain of "Faxed Invitation," the Route 66 kicks of "I, Exhale," the Arthur Russell echo of "Ova Nova," the post-New Order flight of "Nylon Strung" -- the list goes on and on. Really it's ridiculous.

And then there are the remixes for others, many of them revolutionary at the time and still deathless, of 108 Grand's "Te Quiero," the dub symphony of Leftfield's "Song of Life" as Lemon Interupt (used on FSOL's mind-bending radio Test Transmission 2), the looping funk of Mental Generation's "Cafe Del Mar," the aquatic head trip of William Orbit's "Water from a Vine Leaf," the galloping remix of Drum Club's "Sound System." And on and on.

Hawtin, Moby, the Chems, Prodigy, Orbital, even the more purist greats, Black Dog, Jeff Mills, Underground Resistance -- all stellar -- but in my book, Underworld are truly one of a kind. But that's for another time.
Electrohound

Underworld Electrohound

August 20, 2016
Indeed! Agree on all points. Dubnobass is still my favorite album by any artist.
Mommar

Underworld Mommar

August 16, 2016
edited over 2 years ago
One of a Kind and, I would argue, the absolute best. Their entire discography is eminently listenable, it's near impossible for a band to release six+ albums and not have a dud or two but they've gone from hit to hit. I honestly cannot name more than a handful of tracks I'm not terribly fond of, and those tracks are still listenable. I don't hate them, it's just the worst of their bunch are still fantastic.

Let's not forget they've perfected the art of catchy/lyrical/groovy/beautiful repetition. By it's definition Techno is repetitious and a lot of it is damn hard to listen to. Yet somehow Underworld found just the right balance between sound/style/whatever to not only embrace repetition but make it feel exciting and human.

To top that all off, Dubnobass... is twenty two years old as of this writing. The production still sounds fresh today. You could play all of those tracks now and they would still work. It's utterly amazing how magnificently the production has aged. And it's pretty much true of every one of their albums.
irq506

Underworld irq506

April 3, 2016
Very influential band! Highly influential to other forward thinking musicians, with many collaborations from early on. Underworld, to me are a very refreshing sound, even now in 2016.
anton.hystrix

Underworld anton.hystrix

November 23, 2015
edited over 3 years ago
Underworld indeed is one of the best british electronic music acts. And before that they were quite good rock band. I love and respect them. But I agree that many people overrate them, especially today. Dubnobass... and Second Toughest In The Infants were perfect, I added them to my list of the best conceptual albums ever created. The next album Beacoup Fish ruined all this, I consider it as their worst work, maybe Darren was thinking the same and eventually left the band. After that Karl and Rick made some good music (Bird 1 and Scribble from the last album are very strong IMO) but overall work was much more 'plain' than before.

One important thing about Underworld is that people try to find some meaning in their lyrics. This is a mistake because Karl Hyde uses his voice only as a musical instrument. His words really make no sense because they are developed to fit into the sound, to be in harmony with the synthesisers. They have no meaning at all and I totally love this unusual approach because it sounds great ;)
Electrohound

Underworld Electrohound

June 6, 2016
Eskolaah, I think you should listen to "Best Mamgu Ever" and "Bird 1" from later albums, and maybe consider that as much as we loved that period, the '90s are never coming back. It has less to do with Emerson departing IMO and more to do with the fact that it was time to move on in general. Everybody did. Not many of the great '90s acts, maybe none, except for The Chems' "It Began In Afrika" maybe, has that crazy energy. And if they stayed committed to the dance floor like Richie Hawtin, it's been more about intellectual chin stroking than letting loose. The world changed too. Besides, Underworld have shown they are more than just a great rave act. They did that. Why repeat themselves over and over. They have more to say, even while still, to my mind, staying true to the values of the rave scene in terms of creative bravery, their live performances and making music with humanity at its core and machines and beats at the fore. Anyhow, that's how I see it.
evenflouw

Underworld evenflouw

December 24, 2015
edited over 3 years ago
Agreed but to me their downfall started after Darren Emerson left. Beacoup Fish is still an ok album and Push Upstairs is one of strongest singles from Underworld but the follow-up album.... I still can't listen A Hundred Days Off because it's so bland and awful.
Music-Maestro

Underworld Music-Maestro

December 8, 2014
edited over 4 years ago
Underworld: European Club Gig (2xCD, Unofficial, No Label, UND 001/02, 1996).
Tracklist available, as is the 2cd set itself.
bullfinchart

Underworld bullfinchart

February 13, 2014
It's important to remember, with Underworld, that from Dubnobasswithmyheadman onward they weren't just a 'dance' group, as is often said. Their albums contain as much downtempo and ambient material as danceable techno. This material features many of the gems from their career: Tongue, Most 'Ospitable, Sappy's Curry, Puppies, Skym, Sola Sistim, Good Morning Cockerel, Best Mamgu Ever, Louisiana, to name just a few. These pieces complement the atmospheric techno tracks perfectly (Luetin, Juanita, Dirty Epic...), and their mastery of serious thoughtful music is matched by their skill at creating commercial, yet entirely odd, singles (the obvious ones - Born Slippy, Push Upstairs, Two Months Off).

What is most obvious when trawling their back catalogue is their genuine artistry - unlike a lot of artists who make music in and around the 'dance' category, Underworld have retained entirely idiosyncratic from the word go, from their unique messy artwork (all created by Tomato, the art collective the band are part of), to Karl Hyde's off the wall lyrics and the regular use of imaginary words and strange phrases in their song titles (Telematic Peal, Holding the Moth, Banstyle, Kiteless, Mmm... Skyscraper I Love You, Spoonman - I could go on!). Their soundtrack work highlights yet another side the band, which they excel at (the Breaking & Entering score with Gabriel Jared comes very highly recommended). They are a group with an identity who only ever do things their way, to express their own (often bizarre) take on the world. One of those groups whose discography keeps throwing out absolute gems, however deep you dig.
burketop

Underworld burketop

December 18, 2018
They truly are very unique, their stuff that's not giant club anthems is my fave stuff and makes the singles worth collecting too, especially the last couple tracks off the 9-track maxidisc CD (Mosaic and Deep Arch are SO GOOD) of Pearl's Girl. I'll give everything they do at least a once through given how much of it continues to resonate (haha) with me.
crazyaejay

Underworld crazyaejay

March 18, 2015
Well said.