Eugene Wallace

Variations:

Eugene Wallace Discography Tracks

Albums

Eugene Wallace - Book Of Fool album art Eugene Wallace Book Of Fool (Album) ABC Records UK 1974 Sell This Version
EMC 3067 Eugene Wallace - Dangerous album art Eugene Wallace Dangerous(LP, Album) EMI Records EMC 3067 UK 1975 Sell This Version

Singles & EPs

Eugene Wallace - Don't You Feel It? album art Eugene Wallace Don't You Feel It? (Single) EMI UK 1974 Sell This Version
ABC-11419 Eugene Wallace - Rock Me On The Water album art Eugene Wallace Rock Me On The Water(7", Single, Promo) ABC Records ABC-11419 US 1974 Sell This Version
ABC-11446 Eugene Wallace - Don't You Feel It / The Gambler album art Eugene Wallace Don't You Feel It / The Gambler(7", Single) ABC Records ABC-11446 US 1974 Sell This Version
PSR 384 Eugene Wallace - One Kind Woman / Dangerous album art Eugene Wallace One Kind Woman / Dangerous(7", Promo) EMI PSR 384 UK 1975 Sell This Version
GRC 2079 Eugene Wallace - Kind Woman Kind / The Killer album art Eugene Wallace Kind Woman Kind / The Killer(7") GRC GRC 2079 US 1975 Sell This Version
Eugene Wallace - To Love Somebody album art Eugene Wallace To Love Somebody (Single) Ariola UK 1978 Sell This Version

Reviews

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music_emporium

December 24, 2014
Eugene Wallace was a songwriter and singer who was very highly respected within the music industry but unfortunately was critically overlooked because his voice was judged to have too strong a resemblance to that of Joe Cocker. Wallace grew up in Ballynanty, Co. Limerick, and as a teenager played in bands such as Sweet Street, MacBeth and The Rake N’ Ramblers, with future members of Horslips and Granny’s Intentions. He left Limerick for the clubs of the Netherlands and Denmark in 1971, before moving to London. He appeared at the George Harrison-organised charity ‘Concert for Bangladesh’ in 1971 alongside The Who, Rod Stewart & The Faces, Atomic Rooster and the Grease Band, which led to a production deal with Neptune Productions, owners of Trident Studios and the company behind Queen.

This debut album was recorded in 1972, the sessions for which featured Phil Collins (who still cites Wallace as one of his favourite singers), Tim Renwick, John Hawken, Roger Taylor and others. Apparently Neptune initially planned an album of cover versions to showcase Wallace’s voice but he then demoed some of his own original songs and these made up half the songs on the album, alongside covers of Tim Buckley, Randy Newman and Jackson Browne. The self-written title track, in particular, shows off his gravelly soulful blues voice at full force.

Book of Fool was not released until 1974, by which time Wallace’s contribution to the soundtrack album of the 1973 David Essex film “That’ll Be The Day” (recorded with Rick Grech and Keith Moon) had already become his first vinyl release. Although it had both a UK and US release, Book of Fool failed to make the hoped-for commercial breakthrough, and for the follow-up album, Wallace was encouraged to record material more in the style of Joe Cocker in an attempt to gain wider appeal. The 1975 album Dangerous, recorded with musicians including Chris Spedding and Phil Collins, was not released in the USA and was criticised for being a rip-off of Joe Cocker’s music. Apart from a single released in 1978, this was the end of Wallace’s recording career, although he played gigs in Limerick during the 1980s and found work recording voice-overs for TV advertising before his death in November 1999, aged just 49.

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