Being

Being

Real Name:
Dave Paton
Aliases:
Variations:
Viewing All | Being

Being Discography

Albums

tfsm/push 002 Being The Tides Remix Album(CD, Album) Push (3) tfsm/push 002 Germany 1996 Sell This Version
Being Tides (Album) The Spacefrogs Germany 1997 Sell This Version
Being Memory Of Haste (Album) Nute Records Ireland 2008 Sell This Version
Being Deteriorate (Album) This Machine Is Broken UK 2010 Sell This Version
TMIB015 Being Naptime(9xFile, Album, FLAC) This Machine Is Broken TMIB015 UK 2011
Being Just Visiting This Machine Is Broken UK 2013
none Being Saint Nothing(9xFile, ALAC, Album) This Machine Is Broken none UK 2016
none Being Stair(6xFile, ALAC, Album) This Machine Is Broken none UK 2017

Singles & EPs

Being Monthly Transmission October Special Emissions UK 1995 Sell This Version
Being Monthly Transmission August Special Emissions UK 1995 Sell This Version
Being Monthly Transmission September Special Emissions UK 1995 Sell This Version
SE-010, SE010 Two Lone Swordsmen And A Being Two Lone Swordsmen And A Being - Two Lone Swordsmen And A Being(12", Ltd, W/Lbl) Special Emissions, Special Emissions SE-010, SE010 UK 1996 Sell This Version
tfsm/push 004 Being The Tides Remix Single(12") Push (3) tfsm/push 004 Germany 1996 Sell This Version

Compilations

Being Selected Transmissions / Point Two (Comp) Special Emissions UK 1995 Sell This Version

Reviews

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darknesstraveller

darknesstraveller

June 4, 2015
Spring (1995). The lazy Sunday afternoon ritual inside an Edinburgh tenement flat. A Scotsman with a casually comparable resemblance to Cuba’s revolutionary leader, rolls up the cigarette papers and sets the wheels of the tape machine rolling. A gritty lo-fi magnetic ambience turns from inside to out in accompaniment to the smoky spirals unravelling through the room. The tracks feel almost cyclical. "It's 'Tides'," Being tells me, smiling.

Summer. A live set of self-confessed "weird mellow shit" is premiered at Edinburgh's experimental environment, The Blue Room. The sounds escaping from behind a white linen screen, celebrate, commemorate and commend the first of three monthly releases in the ‘Special Emissions’ series, a highly collectible and easily identifiable label established by Andrew Weatherall to encourage young pioneers.

Autumn. A late weekday night. Another Edinburgh tenement. The only source of light in the room emanates from the blue vapour glow of the television set. The only sound is the hum of electricity, and the gentle rustle of flimsy cigarette papers. The screen becomes the centre of attention. "To understand my inspiration," says Being, slowly turning up the set’s volume, pausing only to inhale, "You've got to watch Prisoner Cell Block H." In the gloom it's too dark to tell whether he's smiling or not.

Winter. Midway through the 'SabreToothedMegaDog' tour. The rain wipes away the late night tiredness, puts the morning after into place. In contrast to the moody languor of the current album 'Tides' (available on Spacefrog), last night's edgy performance from Being drove an audience of dancers deeper into their awakened dream. The bass drum provoked limbs toward exhaustion and the higher frequencies tweaked innumerable synapses into new combinations. "Techno beats are all very well, but they give me a headache," admits Being over breakfast "When you're a kid, musical instruments are magical objects. There's no reason why that should stop as you get older." Although more than a decade's experience inform his work, the abilities of this music maker are only beginning to be recognised. In keeping with other mavericks, his creativity was previously restricted to the privacy of bedroom beginnings. "When I was young I'd bring a trumpet home from school, just to make wild noises in my bedroom. I was always told to stop doing things that were not tuneful. It was always the verse-chorus-verse type of situation. Now my Dad says 'Well son, Ah dinnae understand it, but Ah think it's alright.'"

"I've been making music since 1 was 10. I got my first keyboard when I was 11 'cos I got a loan of a wee Bontempi organ, but I played in the Livingston brass band; that was how I learnt music. I had a really brilliant teacher taught me how to read music, all that stuff. For a full year I just got taught how to play the instrument, forced to learn the pitch; 'Think of a note before you play it'. So that gave me a good sense of music and harmony. When I got into keyboards I thought it was brilliant because it was a lot less hard work. Just playing with two hands, you can do a lot more. So I got well into that. Learned to play piano. Joined bands. But I just got to the point were I thought bands were a waste of time. Too many egos, too much attitude." A qualified piano tuner, who returned to education to study music, Being dropped out to pursue his own audio experiments, owing to "Established education's lack of interest in trying to create new music."

"It must have been three or four years ago I first started getting into techno and ambient music and all that. Before that I'd been in bands, and it was always play-orientated; playing pianos, organs, strings, whatever else. Then it became everything, with the machines. It wasn't so much about tunes or harmonies, but sounds, rhythms, ideas."

"Inspiration is just, whatever. I'm working every day, writing a new track every day. There's tracks I did a couple of months back I couldn't tell you what they were about or where they came from or even their names. You do it, tape it, forget about it, and that's it. You might listen to it later."

"I'd always been striving to get the sound as good, clean and nice with all levels equal. Now I like a bit of dirt and grit. If you've a machine you're working with and it's making a bit of noise, rather than trying to get rid of the noise, you should enhance it. That's what I think's needed now, because a lot of techno has become stale, too clean, weak. Not all of it, obviously."

A compulsive creator, Being has recorded with Neil Landstrumm, under the guise 'Trianacloud.' Throughout Spring 1994 he designed and performed a different experimental set every week at The Blue Room, recreating each event as if for the first time. Other material was aired monthly at the escape arena of Edinburgh's full-on industrial techno-fest, Sativa. This intensive period of live work offered a testing ground for composed material and provided opportunity to analyse new approaches to improvisation. Being's first full length release 'Tides,' was originally constructed as a set for Sativa. The second album 'Summerend' was collaged from two home recording sessions in October 1994.

By Summer of this year, in collaboration with Detroit producer Claude Young, Being had enlivened Scanner's 'Mass Observation' track for release on New Electronica though his contribution went uncredited. Alternative expressions from the inventive Young-Being axis are evident on the distinctive ‘Special Emissions' trilogy. The 'Invisible Soundtracks' series on Leaf include other Being recordings. Hidden inside these varied and abundant releases, a multitude of influences are almost detectable: the drama of Matt Johnson, the insight of John Lennon. Listen deeper and you might hear groove some psychedelia from Thirteenth Floor Elevators, intergalactic lullabies from The Orb, the Fluxus sound experiments of Yoko Ono or the makeshift rhythms of :zoviet*france:.

"You get a lot of people describing their music, when they did that and why they did that, but I don't work like that. I just switch on the machines, look at each of them and ask myself 'Which one do I want to play with? Is this noise any good, I quite like this noise, I'll do something with that.' I think quite a lot of the time it'll be mellow and laid back, but that's the opposite in my mind because my mind's quite fast and always thinking, about nonsense. I don't know. I can't explain it. It's just music."

"Sometimes when I'm working I don't really feel, sort of, real. It's a dream. And in life a lot of the time, as well... You wake up in the morning, and most people are fuzzy until they wash, but once I've done that I'm still all fuzzy and not wakened up. I'm like that all the time."

"The reason I do it is because I really, really like it. I love playing with the machines and I love getting inside the machines. I love creating sounds which just send shivers up my spine. It's not really about anything, it's just what I like doing. There's no deep theory behind it. I wish there was. That would be great for my sleeve notes, but… You lead life the way you want to, if you're lucky. For me that's just about writing music."

(written November, published December 1995)

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