Ronnie Montrose

Profile:
American guitarist, born November 29, 1947 and died on March 3, 2012.
Guitarist Ronnie Montrose began his career as a backing musician, playing with Van Morrison, Boz Scaggs, and Edgar Winter. He finally formed his own band in 1973. Named after the guitarist, Montrose also featured vocalist Sammy Hagar, bassist Bill Church, and drummer Denny Carmassi; they released their debut album in 1974, and Church was replaced by Alan Fitzgerald shortly after its release. Released the following year, Paper Money confirmed the band's status as one of the more popular hard rock acts of their era. However, Hagar was fired after completing the Paper Money tour. Bob James replaced him and keyboardist Jim Alcivar joined the band, yet Montrose's next two albums -- 1975's Warner Brothers Presents Montrose and 1976's Jump on It -- were commercial failures. Ronnie Montrose broke up the band after the release of Jump on It and began his own solo career with the all-instrumental Open Fire (1978). Montrose then formed another hard rock group, Gamma, which recorded three albums between 1979 and 1982. After they broke up in 1982, Montrose picked his solo career once again. He released a rather low-key album, Territory, in 1983, following it four years later in 1987 with the hard-rocking and impressive Mean (attributing it to Gamma). The Speed of Sound appeared in 1988, with The Diva Station, a semi-instrumental mesh of soul, pop, metal, and jazz, arriving in 1990. Montrose began putting more of his time into production work, but continued to release solo albums, including Mutatis Mutandis (1991), Music from Here (1994), Mr. Bones (1996), Roll Over and Play Live (1999), and Bearings (1999), before reuniting Gamma for a fourth Gamma album in 2000. Montrose continued his production and session work, and would tour regularly over the last dozen years of his life, despite battling prostate cancer during the late 2000s. A self-inflicted gun shot ended his life on March 3, 2012. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine & Steve Leggett, Rovi
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Ronnie Montrose Discography Tracks

Albums

Ronnie Montrose - Open Fire album art Ronnie Montrose Open Fire (Album) Warner Bros. Records Brazil 1978 Sell This Version
Ronnie Montrose - Territory album art Ronnie Montrose Territory (Album) Passport Jazz US 1986 Sell This Version
Ronnie Montrose - The Speed Of Sound album art Ronnie Montrose The Speed Of Sound (Album) N.E.W Musidisc US 1988 Sell This Version
Ronnie Montrose - The Diva Station album art Ronnie Montrose The Diva Station (Album) Enigma Records (3) US 1990 Sell This Version
Ronnie Montrose - Mutatis Mutandis album art Ronnie Montrose Mutatis Mutandis (Album) I.R.S. Records US 1991 Sell This Version
697-124-1452 Ronnie Montrose - Mr. Bones (Original Soundtrack Music) album art Ronnie Montrose Mr. Bones (Original Soundtrack Music)(CD, Album) SegaSoft 697-124-1452 US 1996 Sell This Version
Ronnie Montrose - Bearings album art Ronnie Montrose Bearings (Album) RoMoCo US 1999 Sell This Version
0-2000 Ronnie Montrose - Roll Over And Play Live! album art Ronnie Montrose Roll Over And Play Live!(CD, Album, Onl) RoMoCo 0-2000 US 1999 Sell This Version
Ronnie Montrose - 10x10 album art Ronnie Montrose 10x10 (Album) Rhino Records (2) US 2017 Sell This Version

Singles & EPs

Ronnie Montrose - Town Without Pity album art Ronnie Montrose Town Without Pity (Single) Warner Bros. Records France 1978 Sell This Version
PB 3901 Ronnie Montrose - Love You To / Catscan album art Ronnie Montrose Love You To / Catscan(12", Promo) Passport Records PB 3901 US 1986 Sell This Version
EPRO-074 Ronnie Montrose - Mach 1 album art Ronnie Montrose Mach 1(12", Promo) Enigma Records (3) EPRO-074 US 1988 Sell This Version

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RazorBoy143

RazorBoy143

January 26, 2014
RE: PITU242 comments:

Here's the truth: Ronnie Montrose died due to a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, not by cancer of any sort (which he beat in 2011). That was the lie his family put out for a whole month after his death. The truth was finally revealed when the corner's office in California revealed it. He was, though, somebody who suffered from clinical depression for much of his life, refused to seek treatment and, instead, self-medicate with booze, which is what eventually lead to his suicide years later.
BankofVinyl

BankofVinyl

March 8, 2012
edited over 6 years ago
Guitarist Ronnie Montrose began his career as a backing musician, playing with Van Morrison, Boz Scaggs, and Edgar Winter. He finally formed his own band in 1973. Named after the guitarist, Montrose also featured vocalist Sammy Hagar, bassist Bill Church, and drummer Denny Carmassi; they released their debut album in 1974, and Church was replaced by Alan Fitzgerald shortly after its release. Released the following year, Paper Money confirmed the band's status as one of the more popular hard rock acts of their era. However, Hagar was fired after completing the Paper Money tour. Bob James replaced him and keyboardist Jim Alcivar joined the band, yet Montrose's next two albums -- 1975's Warner Brothers Presents Montrose and 1976's Jump on It -- were commercial failures. Ronnie Montrose broke up the band after the release of Jump on It and began his own solo career with the all-instrumental Open Fire (1978). Montrose then formed another hard rock group, Gamma. Gamma recorded three albums between 1979 and 1982. After they broke up in 1982, Montrose picked his solo career once again. He released a rather low-key album, Territory, in 1983, following it four years later in 1987 with the hard-rocking and impressive Mean (attributing it to Gamma). The Speed of Sound appeared in 1988, with The Diva Station, a semi-instrumental mesh of soul, pop, metal and jazz, arriving in 1990. Montrose began putting more of his time into production work, but continued to release solo albums, including Mutatis Mutandis (1991), Music from Here (1994), Mr. Bones (1996), Roll Over and Play Live (1999), and Bearings (1999), before reuniting Gamma for a fourth Gamma album in 2000. Montrose continued his production and session work, and would tour regularly over the last dozen years of his life before finally losing his long battle with prostate cancer and passing on March 2, 2012.

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