Hugh Tracey

Hugh Tracey

Profile:
British ethnomusicologist (1903–1977).
He began making field recordings of music in the early 20's, through the 70's, founded The International Library of African Music (ILAM) in 1954, and developed an adaptation of the African thumb piano Mbira, known as the Kalimba. Director of the Music of Africa Series.
The SWP Records series Historical Recordings By Hugh Tracey gathers most of his African recordings on 22 CDs.
His sons Andrew Tracey and Paul Tracey became musicians and musicologists too.
Sites:
Variations:

Hugh Tracey Discography

Albums

Hugh Tracey Congo Drums London Records UK 1952 Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey Congo - Songs And Dances Decca UK 1952 Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey African Dances Of The Witwatersrand Gold Mines Part 2 (Album) Gallotone UK 1952 Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey Music Of The Uganda Protectorate (Album) London Records UK 1952 Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey Music Of Africa Series N°.11 Decca South Africa 1953 Sell This Version
GALP 1251 Hugh Tracey Music Of The Northern Zaire (Sudanic)(LP) Gallotone GALP 1251 1963 Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey Down By The River Gallotone, Gallotone South Africa 1966 Sell This Version
LK 4914 Hugh Tracey The Lion On The Path And Other African Stories(LP, Album, Mono) Decca LK 4914 UK 1968 Sell This Version
LK 4915 Hugh Tracey More African Stories(LP, Mono) Decca LK 4915 UK 1968 Sell This Version
LK 4916 Hugh Tracey The Bird Of The Valley And Other African Stories(LP, Mono) Decca LK 4916 UK 1968 Sell This Version
DLPL 319/20 Hugh Tracey African Dances Of The Witwatersrand Gold Mines, Part 12/13(2xLP) Gallo Record Company DLPL 319/20 South Africa 1975 Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey Music Of Africa Series No 29 - Musical Instruments 3: Drums Gallo, Gallo South Africa 1985 Sell This Version
DGL 894/5 Hugh Tracey Instruments Of Africa(2xLP) Gallo DGL 894/5 Italy 1985 Sell This Version
GALP 1503, No. 36 Various, Recorded by Hugh Tracey* Various, Recorded by Hugh Tracey* - The Music Of Africa Series No. 36 Instruments 7 Guitars 2(LP, Mono) Gallo, Music Of Africa Series GALP 1503, No. 36 South Africa Unknown Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey African Dances Of The Witwatersrand Gold Mines Part 1 ‎ Gallotone UK Unknown Sell This Version
LF 1174, LF.1174 Hugh Tracey Music Of Africa Series No. 9 African Stories Told By Hugh Tracey (10", Mono) Decca, Decca LF 1174, LF.1174 South Africa Unknown Sell This Version
LF 1224, LF.1224 Hugh Tracy* Music Of Africa Series No 10 (The Best Recordings Of 1953 Part 1)(10", Mono) Decca, Decca LF 1224, LF.1224 UK Unknown Sell This Version

Singles & EPs

XTR 7130, XTR.7130 Hugh Tracey Music Of The Northern Congo (I) (Sudanic)(7", EP) International Library Of African Music, International Library Of African Music XTR 7130, XTR.7130 South Africa 1963 Sell This Version
Hugh Tracey Musical Instruments 1. Strings (EP) Gallotone South Africa Unknown Sell This Version
XEP.7134, XEP-7134 Hugh Tracey Rhodesia I(7", EP) Gallotone, Gallotone XEP.7134, XEP-7134 South Africa Unknown Sell This Version
XEP 7136 Hugh Tracey Musical Instruments 2. Reeds (Mbira)(7", EP) Gallotone XEP 7136 South Africa Unknown Sell This Version

Compilations

Alan Lomax, Hugh Tracey Alan Lomax, Hugh Tracey - British East Africa (Comp) Columbia Masterworks US 1955 Sell This Version

Reviews

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vehscle

vehscle

February 8, 2013
Probably one of the most prolific ethnomusicologists and field-recording collectors of the African continent: when you see Hugh Tracey credited on a release, you can be assured of good recording quality and detailed footnotes. Tracey was one of the first in his field who wanted to bring music from (mainly) south and middle Africa to western audiences, as opposed to simply documenting its existence. He even went so far as to adapt the classic Shona instrument, the mbira, to western musical modes resulting in the modern kalimba. This genuine passion contrasts quite distinctly with much ethnomusicology of the period, which took a clinical, even psychoanalytical approach (the diagnosis often being a so-called ‘primitivism’).

Tracey also consistently credited individual artists wherever possible, a fairly basic sign of respect, but a convention that took most French and German ethnographic labels several more decades to adopt. On top of all of that, to reiterate, he made good bloody recordings.

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