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If You Like Fôrça Bruta by Jorge Ben, Listen to These 4 Albums

Patuá Discos recommends music for fans Fôrça Bruta by Jorge Ben.

Discogs asked some of the best record stores around the world for new music recommendations inspired by popular records within the Discogs community. Fans of Fôrça Bruta by Jorge Ben will love these listening suggestions.

Fôrça Bruta
Jorge Ben
2021
Latin, Samba, MPB
Vinyl, Limited Edition, Reissue, 180 gram, Halloween Orange
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Recommendations based on

Fôrça Bruta

By Jorge Ben

This recommendation by Paulo Sakae Tahira, Owner of Patuá Discos in São Paulo, Brazil.

Many people worldwide relate Jorge Ben to hits like “Mas Que Nada” and “Chove Chuva” as well as his Afro-samba-jazz in the 1960s. With Fôrça Bruta, he found his sound, which he describes as “samba school beat after the carnival parade.” With the legendary Trio Mocotó and long recording sessions, he made a record that brought a standard beat to the samba rock movement in tracks like “O Telefone Tocou Novamente” and “Oba, Lá Vem Ela.”


If you like

Fôrça Bruta

by Jorge Ben

you’ll also like these albums


Maravilhas Contemporâneas
Luiz Melodia
2018
Jazz, Latin, Funk / Soul, Folk, World, & Country
LP, Black Vinyl, Reissue
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Recommendation #1

Maravilhas Contemporâneas

By Luiz Melodia

In the 1970s, labels were observing what brought thousands of young Black people to big clubs in Rio de Janeiro and wanted to get into the movement, first with vinyl compilations of the best DJs in town and later with a Brazilian scene for the bands to enter in the venues. Maravilhas Contemporâneas is from these times, although it does not exactly follow this reference. It is an outstanding record with a great band backing Melodia at his best. With songs like “Veleiro Azul” and “Congênito,” he established a style that followed him during the rest of his career.

Bebeto
Bebeto
1975
Latin, Samba
Vinyl
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Recommendation #2

Bebeto

Bebeto

Samba rock is not a blend of samba and rock, but rather a dance style with roots in Black backyard parties of the late 1950s. The genre changed throughout time, and DJs played a major role, choosing dance tracks that could go from jazz to soul to samba to ‘60s rock. One of the most important artists and albums of samba rock, Bebeto’s first LP is a masterpiece. With songs like the anthem “Segura a Nega,” he paved his career with several hits in the style.

Luis Vagner
Luis Vagner
1976
Rock, Latin, Funk / Soul, Pop
LP, Black Vinyl
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Recommendation #3

Luis Vagner

Luis Vagner

This is the second album from the outstanding guitar player, who was honored by Jorge Ben in the “Luiz Vagner Guitarreiro” track. Like Bedeu and Pau Brasil, Vagner represents southern Brazil where the style is called samba rock. Tracks like “Guitarreiro,” “Tesourão,” and “Lá No Partenon” make this record a classic, in addition to the groovy “Frescura de Uma Mulher.”

Recommendation #4

Samba-Tropi

Wilson Das Neves

Wilson Das Neves is one of the greatest Brazilian drummers. The timbales in the drum set, which became a Das Neves trademark for ages, were used for the first time on this record. Released by the great Elenco label, Samba-Tropi is definitely a holy grail in Brazilian vinyl culture.

A bin of records at Patuá Discos São Paulo Record Store

Patuá Discos São Paulo Record Store, São Paulo, Brazil

More about the record store that made these recommendations:

Patuá Discos

São Paulo, Brazil

São Paulo boasts more than a hundred record stores and hundreds of online vendors, 12 million people, a blend of different cultures, and a vinyl DJ scene that includes underground brazuca parties, samba rock balls, and electronic venues. When I was previously interviewed about why Brazilian music has always been heavily enjoyed throughout the decades, I pointed out the interest from different countries. In the 1980s, record dealers from places like London or Tokyo came for bossa nova and bossa jazz albums. Then, in the late 1990s, they came after Brazilian funk and soul grooves; in the 2000s for Northeast rhythms like forró and Brazilian boogie; and in the 2010s for tropical beats like carimbó and experimental records from the late ‘80s and ’90s.

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