• ledjfab over 8 years ago

    Hi. I took a lot of time to write the following text. It concerns the Whigfield / Annerley Gordon feud happening on Discogs.
    Some members of Discogs destroyed half of the work that I had done over the years on the Eurodance side of the Database. They put themselves together and erased many profiles. They tried to change my releases, etc.
    I hope this text can give another perspective than the one proposed by the Pignagnoli estate and their followers and who had become the only official version accepted by the purists.
    This text is also a request for people to collaborate for the database, and not against it. Some people took their anger and frustration to a level where they don't care about the general aspect of the information given here. They act for their persona, not for the hundreds of people using this database everyday.
    Remember Earl De Winter? The malefic manager of the Crescendolls (Daft Punk)?
    Unfortunately, there are several REAL Earl De Winter out there. They are not really artists: they pack up together the talents of many people, and then present it under all sorts of flavours. Their ambition is not very artistic, it is purely and factually commercial: they care about how much the records sell. No more, no less.
    We can have several opinions about the matter. We can decide to care only for the music (which is one thing). We can also decide to care only for the image (therefore the music is less important). We can understand the concept of 'fictive artists' or reject it using several arguments. It's really up to anyone.
    Daft Punk, for example, are only 'half real'. A large part of their identity is fictive: they're not really robots, and you will have guess by now that they don't live like this 24 hours a day. This is all purely 'made up' for the show.
    Fictive projects are found in all the fields of contemporary music: even rock 'n' roll. Think about THE TRAVELING WILBURYS, a fictive group that comprised Roy Orbison, George Harrisson and Tom Petty. All of them were refered as the WILBURYS, a musical family which never actually existed.
    In the world of Dance music, a lot of this kind of projects were produced over the years. Some of them involved lipsync, models and fake origins. Generally, all of this was made up for money. You can be disgust about it, or, as Karine Sanche said to me once (she is the owner of the greatest Eurodance database on the Internet) you can also take it with a grain of salt because in the end 'it's only music'.
    I do agree with her, but also feel that the truth is important.
    Since not a lot of people know the undercover world of the music business, I decided to write this text and inform people about what I know. I can also furnish examples that you can compare, and then make your own ideas about it.

    THE LIPSYNC CONCEPT: WHY and WHEN?
    GROUPS OR ARTISTS THAT HAVE USED LIPSYNC OVER THE YEARS (EXAMPLES):
    LIME (1980's)
    BLACK BOX (1989) (Model: KATRINE QUINOL. Vocals: Samples of LOLEATTA HOLLOWAY ('Ride On Time'). Second attempt with MARTHA WASH, who sang on all the subsequent singles of the album 'Dreamland').
    C+C MUSIC FACTORY: The video of 'Everybody Dance Now' had ZELMA DAVIS lipsyncing the vocals of MARTHA WASH.
    TECHNOTRONIC (1989) (FELLY (Model) YA KID K (Vocalist))
    MILLI VANILLI (1990) (The real singers were later revealed as 'The Real Milli Vanilli' by producer Frank Farian - who also produced the Disco act Boney-M in the 1970's.
    REAL MC COY (1989-1995) - (Subsequent years 1996-inwards were 'lipsync free')
    MAXX (1994-1996)
    E-ROTIC: The frontman of this Eurodance act personified no more than 4 or 5 different rappers only by changing his voice. Probably one of the most bizarre stories of this era.
    JK: (Model: Marta Simlat / Vocalist: Jenny Bersola)
    PLAYAHITTY: (Model: Marion / Vocalist: Jenny Bersola)
    CORONA (Model: Olga Maria De Souza / Vocalists: Jenny Bersola - on 'The Rhythm Of The Night' - Sandra Jackson on all subsequent singles and albums up to 2000).
    WHIGFIELD (Model: Sannie Carlson / Vocalist: ANNERLEY GORDON)

    In the 1980's, a famous Disco/Synth Pop duo from Montreal called LIME had worldwide success with many songs.
    Behind LIME was a couple: Denis & Denise Lepage. When it was about touring and giving live performances, two younger models, more attractive, were hired to lipsync the tracks on stage and in the medias. This was made to polish the concept of LIME, thus making it more 'good looking', more commercial, more accessible.
    And it worked. So well that the records were sold by millions all around the globe. Both Denis and Denise Lepage also produced various obscure side projects, using many other aliases.
    In the end, despite the different names and the lipsync stunts, all the money was going to one place, and it permitted Lepage to produce music up to this day.
    Some rumours went as far as pretending 'Denise Lepage' did not exists, and that Denis Lepage himself changed his voice both vocally and electronically to sounds as female as possible.
    The latest incarnation of Denis Lepage as a transgender bring back this hypothesis. But at least, what is sure is that Lime used the lipsync formula.
    In 1989, the BLACK BOX project, led by a trio of Italian producers (also called Groove Groove Melody) used parts of the acapella of 'Love Sensation' by Loleatta Holloway. They cut the vocals, replaced them in a new order and gave the track the title of 'Ride On Time' (this was actually a mistake: the producers gave this title because they thought Holloway was singing '(...) Cause you Ride On Time' when it is actually 'Cause you're Bright On Time'). The rest is history, as they say.
    The BLACK BOX affair continued later with the MARTHA WASH scandal. Visually rejected for being overweight, the producers kept using a model in their videos, lipsyncing the voice of the Queen Of Clubland. Same thing for C+C MUSIC FACTORY, who had vocalist Zelma Davis lipsyncing the Martha Wash vocals in 'Sweat (Everybody Dance Now)'.
    An agreement was later reached so that Wash was credited on the album and went on to be considered as a full part member of the formation (album 'Anything Goes' - single 'Do You Wanna Get Funky' (1994)).
    The same year, TECHNOTRONIC Used Felly as the model lipsyncing the famous classic 'Pump Up The Jam'. The real singer was none other than Ya Kid K, a young female rapper, who the producers though too young to be the image of the act.
    Also the same year, the MILLI VANILLI SCANDAL occured. This is when it culminated. After a disastrous live show, producer Frank Farian was forced to admit he used more than one singer to accomplish what was to be found on every Milli Vanilli song. Some people got angered. Others, who really like the songs more than the image, did not bother much. The duo was forced to renounce to their fame... and to their Grammys, in a now historic press conference.
    This event cristallized the 'lipsync' formula in North America. After that, anybody considering such a scam would think twice about trying to sell a record. The American medias systematically asked the artists to perform live, so that there would be no doubt about the authenticity of the talent.
    In numerous countries, there are laws to protect the consumer against any false representation. Since major labels were selling the records in question, they had to be transparent.
    But in Europe, it quickly became a trademark. Especially in the field of Eurodance.
    In 1989, in Germany, O-Jay formed his group MC SAR & THE REAL MC COY. Their first big hit was a track called 'It's On You'. It relentlessly used lipsync as a backing concept. Indeed, O-Jay had in mind this 'imaginary black rapper', personified by Shampro in the video.
    In 1993, when the group released 'Another Night' and their second album in Europe, it also used lipsync. Shampro was cast away so that O-Jay could do the rapping by himself. However, all the female vocals were performed by a vocalist called KARIN KASAR, also cast away for being overweight. She was replaced in the videos by two girls.
    After that, the story of REAL MCCOY is absolutely stunning. O-JAY himself wrote every aspect of it in his personal blog. He admitted everything with a great courage and told his experience in the music business.
    O-JAY also described how the group MAXX was totally fictive and also used lipsync.
    Then there was the Jenny Bersola syndrome. This singer, the real Queen of Eurodance, featured in the JK Project, produced by Larry Pignagnoli and fronted by a model called Marta Simlat. Then the Corona project, produced by Francesco Bontempi AKA Lee Marrow, and fronted by Olga Maria De Souza. She also worked for Playahitty (a project of Emannuel Asti and fronted by a model called Marion), Libra, Nevada, and countless others.
    As time goes by, Jenny Bersola did admit on her MySpace page that she was the actual vocalist of all these tracks. Sandra Jackson, her friend, also sang for the Corona project (singles 'Baby Baby' and inwards) and had a solo hit ('Bad Boy' produced by Robyx, who also produced ICE MC and Alexia amongst others).
    Speaking of ALEXIA, she did sang the two first singles of the group FOURTEEN 14. Strangely, the female 'vocalist' for the group ramained the same, even after Alexia departed the group. Lipsync again? Most probably.
    So, this is really too bad for all the gorgeous models featured in the videos of these dance acts: the singing talent is elsewhere to be found. And if you are really into the music, and not the image, your interest will probably be driven towards the vocalists (at least, logically).
    The final and most controversial lipsync project that I know about was the Whigfield project. Whigfield was a project of Larry Pignagnoli, Davide Riva and Annerley Gordon. Annerley Gordon was a session vocalist who had previously worked for Francesco Bontempi (Lee Marrow) under the alias of Charme. The song 'Try Me Out', released in 1993, when on to be a hit single. This permitted Gordon to work with Larry Pignagnoli in many different projects, all of them fronted by different models so that the illusion of the 'perfect product' could make the records sell. Another fruitful possibility with this way of work was the possibility to have many tracks on the charts without letting people know the production team was the same. Numerous dance acts and DJ's used this system: Bass Bumpers also used the alias Vamoz ('In The Summer'), Peter Rauhofer used both Club 69 and Danube Dance for his projects with Kim Cooper... and so on. It's not a new technic. It's been used for many years.
    When the Whigfield project was created, Pignagnoli was already pulling the strings behind JK and Lalene (an obscure project which most probably featured the vocals of Annerley Gordon, credited for writing the lyrics).
    Larry Pignagnoli also produced a 'duo' of singers called 'Ally & Joe' where he doubled the vocal tracks of Annerley Gordon and made the two girls lipsync to the specific parts. The story (reported in the Eurodance Encyclopedia by Karine Sanche) of how they apparently met is ridiculous: he said he met them in a library. Very strange since nobody is allowed to talk in this kind of place. How could someone just go in a library and hire a singer out of nowhere? It just doesn't make sense.
    Sannie Carlson, a young model, was hired to front the Whigfield project (it was nothing new: just business as usual for Larry Pignagnoli).
    'Saturday Night', the first single of Whigfield, went on to be a famous dance hit in Europe. It then crossed the Atlantic and started to get played in Canada. Sannie Carlson came in Montreal to promote the song and the album: every performance was lipsync (she apparently left the stage angered when the crowd of Club Dome complained about that - that was told to me by a regular client of that club back then).
    Another example of a lipsync performance she did was at Square Phillips, downtown Montreal. It was retransmitted live on the TQS channel here, all over the province. With her were the two girls of Bananarama (trying a comeback with 'Every Shade Of Blue'). Mitsou, a national dance star, did a short interview with her where she was very evasive. She later 'performed' the Summer Zone Remix of 'Big Time'.
    Another good technic to make a lipsync performance sounds authentic: change the music behind the vocals. People not really into the aspects of the technicality of music will think that because the music is different, the vocals are too.
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think 'Whigfield' promoted anything in the USA (maybe apart 'Saturday Night' and even there, I'm not sure). To go as far could kill the act. After the Milli Vanilli scandal, the medias were making sure everything was authentic.
    In the case of REAL MCCOY, who won 2 Grammys if my memory is good, they had two professional singers hired to lipsync KARIN KASAR in the video and sing her parts onstage. So everything went 'easy'.
    The promotion of any subsequent record (Whigfield 2 and 3 and all supplemental singles) was only European and Asian. In Canada, the only record of Whigfield released was the first one. And guess which company distributed the Whigfield album in Canada? LIME RECORDS.
    AND GUESS WHO WAS THE BOSS OF LIME RECORDS?
    DRUM ROLL: DENIS LEPAGE (from LIME)
    Later on, Lime Records released compilations with many tracks from the Pignagnoli estate, as well as many Eurodance tracks made by Denis Lepage and Joe La Greca under different aliases (the 'Get Up And Dance' serie).
    So... you see, no big deal. Just an amazing story. It's music vs. the image. They are selling more than just the music, they are selling a dream.
    It's not over. Let's continue.
    In 1994-95, when some people started to think Annerley Gordon was singing behind the Whigfield project, they had her entire catalogue to prove it. The track 'Try Me Out' (as mentioned earlier) served as a good example. At the exact same moment, Francesco Bontempi (Lee Marrow) released a new version of 'Try Me Out' with Sandra Jackson singing on it (and Olga Maria De Souza doing lipsync in the video, just like she did with Jenny Bersola for 'The Rhythm Of The Night'). This new release help to 'confuse' people. The new 'Try Me Out' made people forget about the first version, just like a sedative. But dance aficionados did notice something. I know I did.
    Despite being only a model, Sannie Carlson did apparently recorded some of her voice for recent works of the Benassi Bros (she is credited for this - for the first time officially). But the voice is so distorded that I could only see it as a joke. It is unfortunate that these Italian dance projects are so dull, full of pornographic clichés and sex driven. But as long as people will spent some money on this, it will exists.
    Remember the track 'Satisfaction' by Benny Benassi? It used a classic voice synthetizer, available on many PC. I can only see this single as a joke of some sort: they didn't even needed a vocalist anymore. They can manipulate any voice, and bring anybody on screen to illustrate an image able to make records sells.
    Some people can't believe the stories I just wrote here. They prefer to stick to the 'official' texts presented to the press by those greedy producers. It's as unfortunate as the music they do now.
    Larry Pignagnoli is not without talents: he wrote many significant and memorable Eurodance hits. So despite everything, he still have merit somewhere.
    Sannie Carlson? A beautiful girl, an intelligent model and a good actress. But never a singer.
    The profile of Whigfield on Wikipedia is nothing but a copy/paste from the official Whigfield site. It's the corporate text. What they want you to believe.
    The text says it has been proven many times that Whigfield is not Annerley Gordon, but they NEVER actually give you any proof, any detail. Nothing. They just say. They just write it down for you to believe. Nothing else.
    What I do propose is that the profile of 'Whigfield' offers both sides of the story (I do believe in democracy) unless you think I offer enough significant arguments to prove my point. I did explain my point of view in the past in the forum, I am doing it again, but I hope I won't have to do it every month and every year.
    The Eurodance Encyclopedia offers both hypothesis, without confirming any of them. Of course, there was no official 'coming out' of Larry Pignagnoli about the issue. The Whigfield project may be over, it probably still sells enough.
    Obviously, I am not the only one to think the way I do. Explaining my position is long and not that easy since English is not my mere language. But many people deep into the music field are ready to testify in my favor.
    Would you believe someone who lied to you once? If it is proven that Jenny Bersola was the voice of J.K. (and I think there is no doubt about that), then we do have a lipsync act. What would be so new with Whigfield then? It is just a continuation of a concept, larger than just an act.
    To those who will say I do not know what I am talking about: I did lipsync myself, twice, on national television when I toured with a play back in 1985. This is such a common technic, you don't even know how much it's been used over the years.
    This text does not contain any frustration from my side. I bought two singles of Whigfield; I have many Jenny B. and J.K. tracks in my collection. I did not throw them at the garbidge when I learned all of this. If you really like the music, despite everything, then you will keep your records. It will prove that you are not that attracted to the image, but to the music. And Discogs should be about the music, not the image.
    I am not gonna argue with anybody concerning this text. I am offering the people of Discogs my arguments. Feel free to spread them, analyze them, report them, or condemn them. This is my contribution.
  • ledjfab over 8 years ago

    Oh, I forgot about another point:
    Many people claiming Whigfield is not Annerley Gordon use the classic argument of listening the album of 'ANN LEE' (an alias of Annerley Gordon). They claim the voice of Gordon is different on this album.
    Of course it is. She had to change her voice slightly because the Whigfield project was still active. Sannie Carlson could then live in a relative peace of mind.
    Was it produced by Larry Pignagnoli too? I think so.
    Annerley Gordon is a professional singer, and she could 'adapt' to whatever a producer wanted. Listen to her back catalogue and especially 'Try Me Out' by Lee Marrow Feat. Charme. The truth is all there.
  • pastysurprise over 8 years ago

    The Whigfield album covers do look really contrived - all with the supermodel... It's nice to read this explanation. I also wondered why the vocalist was never credited on those.
  • Jayfive over 8 years ago

    Jayfive edited over 8 years ago
    ledjfab
    I am not gonna argue with anybody concerning this text. I am offering the people of Discogs my arguments. Feel free to spread them, analyze them, report them, or condemn them. This is my contribution.


    It would help if you showed what entries in the database you are referring to.

    Your post is dense and complicated enough without people having to search themselves in the db to find what you are talking about.

    And why are you doing this here, surely you should be making your case in the submission notes of the artist/label and release pages in question. I for one would like to cast an eye over this issue but I dont know where to start.

    This isnt a dig at your taste in music but:
    ledjfab
    The Eurodance Encyclopedia


    is just such a pretentious name.
  • Dr.SultanAszazin over 8 years ago

    Interesting POV.

    Apart from the strict release data here (which have to reflect what's on the release), there's also room for more information.
    you can credit people that you know for sure have worked at a certain release with [uncredited] attached to the creditrole. You should have some reference for these in the submission notes. (if not internet, tell at least where you know it from)

    in the release notes you can add a section with background info about the release that's not present on the release itself. Also here you should give some reference.

    you also can comment/review any release here, this is to be used for information that's not completely sure too, like rumours and stuff. Here there is a lot of room for a complete personal approach to a release. Even a simple opinion is allright.

    I advice you to put what you know that way in the releases, as it's ofcourse more than interesting info, which can't be missed.
  • PabloPlato over 8 years ago


    Jayfive
    It would help if you showed what entries in the database you are referring to.


    really? were you not alive in the 90's?
    the only band mentioned that i was not familiar with in that lot was E-rotic.

    and i am surprised to learn that MAXX were lipsynching - i knew they changed the female vocalist between Get-Away & No More, but was the rapper lipsynching too? who did the raps then? (ice mc?)

    ledjfab
    Larry Pignagnoli is not without talents: he wrote many significant and memorable Eurodance hits.


    he also wrote and produced many italo tracks in the 80's, where he pioneered this lipsynch formula (a not too bad looking singer shoved into the shadows while models danced and lipsynched on tv), the earliest of which is probably Fun Fun, where the models were changed and swapped (though always leaving one of them in the combination) with every single released. the real singer of the Fun Fun project (Ivana Spagna) would eventually claim fame under her own name and image under the Spagna project, which is still going, though perhaps whatever criticism she received in the early 80's regarding her appearance and why she couldn't be the front woman to the many projects she and larry worked on seems to have really affected her (her current nick-name is "Plastic Spagna" as she's become a bit of a farce).

    so, back on topic of whigfield, ledjfab, has your information been erroneously removed? can you provide links to what releases or artists profiles you had updated which have been reverted or edited back to hide this truth? we can take a look at them and see what you can do to ensure the info you add cannot be removed (at least not easily and not without a fight)
    :)
  • Starshiptrooper over 8 years ago

    Annerley Gordon is/was also a regular vocalist for the SAIFAM labels, for example:
    DJ SPACE'C ft. ANNE - Love 4 Liberty
    LISA GOMEZ - Sister Golden Hair
    The vocals are exactly the same as "Whigfield".

    One thing I've never understood about Whigfield: if she was just the lipsyncing model, why didn't they choose a more attractive girl?
    Because I think she's ugly.
  • silverleaf over 8 years ago

    I've heard rumors of a lot of this before, but it's good to see it laid out like this.

    I don't know anything about Spagna being considered a farce. Sad if true. I go to be a fan when I ran across a 12" of Call Me.
    Didn't know her before, but I've been a fan ever since and still play Dedicated To The Moon almost once a month.
  • PabloPlato over 8 years ago

    spagna has just gone a bit excessive on the plastic surgery, simmilar to pete burns (of dead or alive)

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/2/2a/Spagna.jpg/220px-Spagna.jpg

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/12/Ivana_Spagna.jpg

    http://www.marilinaeantoniodilauro.it/spagna%20mary.jpg

    http://www.euro-flash.net/Images/ivana_spagna.jpg

    doesnt seem that bad, until you remember what she used to look like

    http://www.musickr.it/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/ivana-spagna1-150x150.jpg

    she's slowly morphing into jocelyn "cat-lady" wildenstein

    http://www.style.it/cont/people-show/si-no/0803/0300/ivana-spagna-tra-grease-e-cindy-lau.asp20594img6.jpg

    http://www.villasantostefano.com/news/2007/agosto/spagna_ivana/spagna_leone_gp_1543.jpg

    still, Call Me (and it's b side, "Girl, It's Not The End Of The World" which has been on heavy rotation on my speakers over the past month) and any italo where she lent her vocals onto are still great!!
  • silverleaf over 8 years ago

    Okay, gotcha.

    Also, I've been waiting in vain for Cyndi Lauper to do a cover of "Why Can't I Say (I Love You Babe)".
    I just hear her whenever I listen to that song. Would a medley with "Time After Time" work?
  • Jayfive over 8 years ago


    PabloPlato

    really? were you not alive in the 90's?
    the only band mentioned that i was not familiar with in that lot was E-rotic.


    I meant we couldve done with links to the release/artists in question to show what had been 'ruined'.

    I remember E-rotic as it goes, they were the ones who had the one that went 'max dont have sex with your sexy ex'
  • PhaedraP over 8 years ago

    OK, it's lip syncing. Gotcha. What does that have to do with Discogs submissions, which have to be entered as they appear on the release? If it says it's a Whigfield single/album/whatever then that is how it is entered. The rest is profile information.

    PabloPlato

    really? were you not alive in the 90's?

    Clearly I wasn't. I'm not into this sort of dance music and I.m not in Europe. Pop in whatever form is of no interest to me.
  • Jayfive over 8 years ago

    Jayfive edited over 8 years ago
    PhaedraP
    What does that have to do with Discogs submissions, which have to be entered as they appear on the release?


    I think its more about whats on artist profiles.

    E.g. here, note the shoutyness from this threads OP:
    http://www.discogs.com/history?artist=Whigfield#latest

    Theres some edits in there that have an agenda. What that agenda is exactly im not sure. I think it is important to detail whether an act had a frontman/woman and another person who sang on the recordings if reliable sources can be found.

    If the OP would care to come back and explain in terms of entries in discogs what he whats to have happen (preferably with links) instead of a densely packed potted history of eurodance, maybe we can get somewhere.

    Also note this user who is obsessed about who sang as whigfield and who lip synced:
    http://www.discogs.com/user/edyneto2010

    We've had problems with users submitting reams of fake Whiggy releases, i hope all this isnt linked to that.
  • PabloPlato over 8 years ago

    edyneto2010
    Ledjfab you really think that???
    I saw Sannie carlson singing live in Brasil only her voice she is Whigfield ...

    haha! this same story gets told of almost every italo/euro lipsynch act.
    corona, et al.
  • PabloPlato over 8 years ago


    PhaedraP
    Clearly I wasn't. I'm not into this sort of dance music and I.m not in Europe


    no you're clearly in the states, right? dance music (proper dance and euro music that is) was never very prevalent in the US as it was here in canada (we couldnt escape it nor did we want to - whether we admit it or not)
    ;)
  • Jayfive over 8 years ago

    The penetration of eurodance in the states seem to extend merely to using 2 Unlimited - Get Ready For This in cheerleading routines and Shamu shows at Seaworld :P

    Some may argue that they should count themselves fortunate
  • PabloPlato over 8 years ago

    dont forget cotton eyed-joe at hockey arenas.
  • PhaedraP over 8 years ago


    Jayfive
    Some may argue that they should count themselves fortunate

    LOL. Perhaps. At least I don't feel like I must be some sort of social outcast who has been living in a closet the last 20 years or so. I'm sure I haven't been... well.... too much :)
  • silverleaf over 8 years ago

    Jayfive
    The penetration of eurodance in the states seem to extend merely to using 2 Unlimited - Get Ready For This in cheerleading routines and Shamu shows at Seaworld :P

    Nah, I live in the US and it's been all around for years if you are into it, but there's so much more than just that. Just depends on what you like or are open to.
  • zevulon over 8 years ago

    Seriously?

    So this 2009 Whigfield (Naan)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhYM86sa2VY
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYSmdSVByTU

    Do you SERIOUSLY believe that this is an English woman singing that tune?
    Is that also Ann Lee?? That she 2009 still makes singback for a Danish woman?
    ledjfab
    Annerley Gordon is a professional singer, and she could 'adapt' to whatever a producer wanted

    I think you think too high of what a "professional singer" actually can do with her voice/intonation.
  • zevulon over 8 years ago

    Do note that Whigfield/Sannie, has composed songs for Ann Lee on her 2007 album So Alive which Sannie writes about on her official page.
  • PabloPlato over 8 years ago


    zevulon
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhYM86sa2VY
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYSmdSVByTU


    hmm..checked out that track with favretto too, sounds like sannie may be doing vocals now, but thats not the same voice that appears on saturday night/another day/big time/etc.
  • PhaedraP over 8 years ago

    Whatever the truth is it does seem to me that the big problem with the profile is that people are shouting at each other and nobody is backing up anything they are saying with links to reputable sources. If you can't substantiate what you are saying then it does not belong in a profile. Profiles are for facts and not for opinions.
  • Starshiptrooper over 8 years ago

    zevulon
    I think you think too high of what a "professional singer" actually can do with her voice/intonation.

    Or maybe it's the producer/technician who's doing the tweaking.
    Even I can do that with a program like audacity.
  • zevulon over 8 years ago


    PabloPlato
    thats not the same voice that appears on saturday night/another day/big time/etc.

    I'd say it's reasonably similar - but it's 15 years later on.
    It's a bit blunt and sounds like "Ace Of Base" (=not a native Englander)
    Ann Lee is a bit more "sharp" and have no Scandinavian accent/tone as I remember.
  • AnnerleyFan over 8 years ago

    Hi everybody, i'm a big fan of Annerley Gordon. I mean, a fan of Ann's VOICE. Despite the hundreds of different aliases she used until today, i'm a fan of her. To me, she is a voice, and her style of music fits a big part of my musical needs. Me and some friends who are also fans of her made a Facebook page in which we did put all of the known songs/albums in which she did vocals with tons of sound clips in which you can hear the same voice even if the artist name changes often. It's worth a visit! She recorded tons of songs but i never took the time to put this discography here on discogs. Her discography here is absolutely not accurate. Maybe someone will want to remake her discography using our facebook page as source.... Just visit and listen to the clips. The proof is there: http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/Annerley-Gordon-Fans-Page-All-thats-on-the-surface-is-not-told/249400478870?ref=ts
    Thank you! Oh and by the way, ledjfab, are you from Quebec?
  • Jayfive over 8 years ago


    AnnerleyFan
    i'm a big fan of Annerley Gordon. I mean, a fan of Ann's VOICE. Despite the hundreds of different aliases she used until today, i'm a fan of her. To me, she is a voice, and her style of music fits a big part of my musical needs. Me and some friends who are also fans of her made a Facebook page in which we did put all of the known songs/albums in which she did vocals with tons of sound clips in which you can hear the same voice even if the artist name changes often.


    First things first - this is NOT a fansite. We document information taken from the releases. If this person does appear where she shouldnt or doesnt appear where she should then thats discogs reflects that. We do not add, remove or alter to show the artist in a better light or maintain some sort of justice where they were wronged.

    AnnerleyFan
    Her discography here is absolutely not accurate


    And its rabid fanboys that are causing most of the errors,

    And if it isnt accurate (and we go by wants on the release so I dont see how it can be any more accurate), care to show us some examples?

    AnnerleyFan
    Maybe someone will want to remake her discography using our facebook page as source....


    Absolutely not. It should be the other way around.
  • psy-mark over 8 years ago

    psy-mark edited over 8 years ago
    AnnerleyFan
    Maybe someone will want to remake her discography using our facebook page as source


    Rule number one on Discogs is 'Have the exact release in front of you when entering it to the database' so it's not allowed to submit from information on a website.

    If you've got releases in your possession that are missing from the db then feel free to add them, otherwise they'll only be added if some else who has them comes along.

    EDIT: But as Jay said above don't add information that does not appear on the release in question.
  • JustinCredible over 8 years ago

    Another very common technique will be to let two (or more) people sing the same tune.

    First the not so professional singer/voice as a reference track, the second, professional singer, will learn to sing in the same manner, tune and note. The second voice will normally do more takes to achieve the best results. Then both vocals will be mixed together, but given the first singer more prominence, overdubbing the second voice. The result will sound like the first voice, but with more clarity and a higher vocal range, similar like the concept of "Wall of sound".

    Some artists do this technique with only one singer, especially Queen have done this often for backgrounds and choirs with different takes all sung by Freddie Mercury.
    But for dance acts this will be commonly done with different voices that lets appear as if the "model/main voice" is a far better singer as it is in reality.

    If that technique was used it will be nearly impossible for a listener to differentiate the voices, because it will sound as if there was only one voice. Without knowing the mastertapes no one can be give correct credits just from listening, only when it is correctly credited on the release.
  • jweijde over 8 years ago

    Jayfive
    Also note this user who is obsessed about who sang as whigfield and who lip synced:
    http://www.discogs.com/user/edyneto2010

    Yeah, his 'review' of Simply Red - Never Never Love (The Remixes) is a classic.
    http://www.discogs.com/reviews?release=217859#c69518
    I've also seen him posting the same thing in similar topics on other online forums.
  • AnnerleyFan over 8 years ago


    jweijde
    Also note this user who is obsessed about who sang as whigfield and who lip synced:
    http://www.discogs.com/user/edyneto2010


    Lol! I see that a lot of people know that crazy and obsessed fan haha

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