• Blackprinceiv over 8 years ago

    I came into possesion of lots of Vinyl marked Promo or Demo on the cover.Sometimes it has a saw cut or a bullit hole sometimes not.Sometimes it's a white label and says it,sometimes it's a regular label with no notifications.Do these vinyls have less value or more.Are they looked upon in a certain way.Can somebody give me a history lesson or some facts about them.Much appreciated.
  • PabloPlato over 8 years ago

    if it is a regular record release that has been marked as a promo via a stamp or saw cut or hole punch or any other form of demarcation, it's not an actual promo. if anything, it may bring the value down.

    a white background label with printed info on it that states promo is a true promo. not all true promos have a white background label. these may be worth more but it depends on the artist and the cult associated with them.

    fyi, in general terms, White Label refers to releases such as this

    http://www.discogs.com/Sunset-Island-Of-Dreams/release/997955

    that have labels that lack proper printing on them.

  • HM-2 over 8 years ago

    sometimes promos can be interesting because they may have different content to the retail version but most of the time it's just the retail release with generic or no artwork at all. At the end it really depends on the individual item, so the value can range from near nothing to highly collectable. As Pablo pointed out already, those mutilated retail versions are usually of less value, other records might be promo only like quite a few Hip Hop albums from the early to mid 90s for example.
  • johnfarruggio over 8 years ago

    It can go either way with this.

    Some people like a promo copy, since it is more rare than the commercial release. Plus, as stated above, once in a while, the promo may include a version that was never on the commercial release.

    On the flip note, sometimes people prefer the commercial release because it might have the artwork sleeve.

    Also, (not sure how true this is), I have heard that some promos have a better sound quality since they were the FIRST pressing of the vinyl using the mother stamper.

    Any input on that?
  • Vinylizm over 8 years ago

    A collectible for example Lexicon 4
  • Blackprinceiv over 8 years ago

    Thank you for the info.The ones I have seem to be of the full retail versions.They all have the inner sleeves that come with the retail versions(lyric or pictures).Some of the others are of the white label versions marked demo/promo/dj.So it is safe to say these as good as the retail versions in most cases.No bad connotation attached.
  • pinkychukkles over 8 years ago

    HM-2
    other records might be promo only like quite a few Hip Hop albums from the early to mid 90s for example.

    Case in point > Alice Smith - Love Endeavor
    Apparently the story behind this was that it was all set to get released commercially but then she got signed up by a major label and the BBE commercial pressing was shelved and so only the promos exist of this fantastic track on vinyl.
  • stevies45s over 8 years ago

    To boil it all down, promos are really separate releases with their own collector following (or lack of following). Some promos are rare and some are common. Promos by particular artists are highly sought, even if they aren't very rare in some cases.
  • haiyai2u over 8 years ago

    Ditto.. i personally like them as in many cases they are some of the first pressings, occasionally they have inserts and information not available on other releases.. The promotionals with embossed "Demonstration" etc I find are pressed as special releases sometimes in advance of the actual release. I agree with the "boiled down" view.
    stevies45s
    To boil it all down, promos are really separate releases with their own collector following (or lack of following). Some promos are rare and some are common. Promos by particular artists are highly sought, even if they aren't very rare in some cases.

  • Blackprinceiv over 8 years ago

    Sound wise in most cases,they are as good if not better than the actual release.Correct.You can't go wrong buying one.Correct
  • avvy over 8 years ago

    Most collectors I know will go for the promo version over the regular release, me included.
  • G.Monk_Collection over 8 years ago

    Sometimes I prefer to have the promo release if the original release has an awful looking cover. :D
  • Blackprinceiv over 8 years ago

    Thanks again.I am interested to know what others think
  • WeedMusic over 8 years ago

    7" promos mostly from the late 60's - late 70's. That have the mono/stereo versions are my favorite. I love the mono sides!
  • stevies45s over 8 years ago


    WeedMusic
    I love the mono sides!

    I'm curious as to why this is so. I didn't realize that anyone would prefer mono over stereo.
  • ihuntvinyl over 8 years ago

    I have and collect many promo albums. From Collective Soul, Foghat, Journey to UFO. Most are plain white sleeves with typewritten content and date on paper attached to plain cover. They sometimes have initials as if they were reviewed and reviewers noted with thier initials. The vinyl itself have plain white label, a few have a or b handwritten on label only. They are very basic and plain. I consider these to be the true first press. They do sound better in my opinion. I have done some research and they say most of these "white albums" have print quantity between 5 to 25 max. Hope this helps!
  • haiyai2u over 8 years ago

    Hi, from what i understand you are describing, i think some of these maybe either test pressings, reference recordings and/or lacquers.
    ihuntvinyl
    Most are plain white sleeves with typewritten content and date on paper attached to plain cover. They sometimes have initials as if they were reviewed and reviewers noted with thier initials. The vinyl itself have plain white label, a few have a or b handwritten on label only. They are very basic and plain.

  • brunorepublic over 8 years ago


    stevies45s
    I'm curious as to why this is so. I didn't realize that anyone would prefer mono over stereo.


    Sometimes -- mostly with 60s material -- the mono versions are different mixes, not just stereo "folded down". Sometimes those mono mixes are just better mixes overall. This is particularly true for The Beatles; most of their stereo mixes up until the white album are quite crude and awkward compared to the mono versions. The mono versions have better instrument balance, no awkward and unnatural hard panning, and sometimes additional effects which are absent from the stereo versions.
  • stevies45s over 8 years ago

    Thanks for the explanation brunorepublic. My eyes are opened.
  • jimiphil over 8 years ago

    people dont realize it now because its usually well after the fact but all those vinyl records that say promo were released BEFORE the actual retail version so at one time they were worth more to the people that wanted them before the actual release,now after the fact they are worth more as many have mixes on them that were never commercially released
  • Ksos63 over 8 years ago

    brunorepublic
    Sometimes -- mostly with 60s material -- the mono versions are different mixes, not just stereo "folded down". Sometimes those mono mixes are just better mixes overall. This is particularly true for The Beatles; most of their stereo mixes up until the white album are quite crude and awkward compared to the mono versions. The mono versions have better instrument balance, no awkward and unnatural hard panning, and sometimes additional effects which are absent from the stereo versions.


    Excellent points! Just to piggyback on what brunorepublic posted about Mono Beatles albums, the UK White Album in Mono is far different than the Stereo pressing in both the UK and USA. Some collectors would even express that the Mono record is, in fact, a "different" album than the stereo one.

    Of course, the widely known thoughts by John Lennon concerning Sgt. Pepper's LHCB ONLY being worth listening to in its Mono form, speaks volumes as to why so many folks prefer these pressings over the stereo ones. The Beatles, as a group, reportedly only spent time mixing the Mono masters of Pepper whilst George Martin dealt with the Stereo variation on his own...

    jimiphil's observations are superb as well, and speaks to two bands (in my favorites of all-time) whose Mono releases of specific titles were never made available to the US commercial market and are extraordinarily expensive; one being The Rolling Stones White Label Mono Promo of 'Sticky Fingers' on Rolling Stones Records in which VG copies sell for well over $1000.00 and The Kinks WLP Mono version of 'Something Else' on Reprise Records which Excellent Conditioned copies generally exceed $300.00 USD.

    Ever see what USA Led Zeppelin WLP albums in Mono go for? I just saw a NM Zeppelin III Mono WLP sell for over $1100.00 at auction and that was, IMO, a steal for the buyer!

    Great topic!
  • WeedMusic over 8 years ago

    The mono sides hit harder on a big system, maybe presed louder to account for AM radio air-play?

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