• drunkbysixx over 4 years ago

    Hi there.

    1. I think being able to go to a friends profile/discogs user profile and have a compare tab where it shows you items that you have similarly vs looking through their entire collection would be a fun addition.

    2. Another feature request/scenario would be if you are trying to trade an item with someone, be able to compare your wantlist with their collection to see if they have the item you are looking for. It would be easier than going through each item individually to see who owns a copy. Similar to the seller feature which tells you what items they have that you have on your wantlist.

    Apologize if any or too many people have requested this, but thought it would be a fun feature and wasn't sure where to post.

    Thanks,

    Michael
  • radum over 4 years ago

    Hi Michael,
    This exact same feature was recently added to the Ogger Club.
    You can compare your and another user's Collection, Wantlist or Inventory.
    More info here: https://www.discogs.com/forum/thread/740947
  • PabloPlato over 4 years ago

    is it safe to login to a third party site with my discogs credentials?
    nik, Diognes_The_Fox, anyone else, care to weigh in?
  • electronic_beat over 4 years ago

    Yes*, to the point that you: trust Discogs' implementation of OAuth 1.0a, trust that the App will not do things you don't want (like deleting your for-sale listings or pass your token to other 3rd parties), trust yourself not to fall for phishing schemes (which would allow the App to get your plaintext credentials, and potentially reuse them against other accounts you may have).

    Nutshell overview of OAuth as used by Discogs: https://www.discogs.com/developers/#page:authentication,header:authentication-oauth-flow
    Wikipedia entry with sourced references about how OAuth is often poorly implemented to the point of being a security risk (though mostly on 2.0 - some think 1.0a safer, despite being obsolete): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oauth
    Lastly, Google/Facebook & friends do use OAuth (2.0, not sure if they use custom implementations).

    So, who do you trust on the Internet?

    *No, it is never safe to enter your actual credentials on a third party site, but I am assuming you mean whether it is safe to login to Ogger Club, where you're not supposed to do that (see OAuth).
  • drunkbysixx over 4 years ago

    Thanks! What is the "Ogger Club" and will Discogs eventually incorporate this into their own interface?
  • electronic_beat over 4 years ago

    drunkbysixx
    Thanks! What is the "Ogger Club" and will Discogs eventually incorporate this into their own interface?

    Inviting radum back to give his pitch.
    Basically he made his own third party web application that sources some info from Discogs (via API) and adds (and maintains) additional data. This enables additional features, such as the aforementioned easy comparison of collections.

    Whether Discogs will copy the interface (or license it, or hire him...) only Staff can say. Judging by the slowness of bug fixing and addition of new features to Discogs, I would not bet on it, unless Ogger Club adds a monetization strategy (or gets acquired) and Discogs starts to feel the heat.
  • radum over 3 years ago

    PabloPlato
    is it safe to login to a third party site with my discogs credentials?

    As a general rule, you should never use one site's credentials on another site, unless they are directly affiliated.

    However, this is not the case in the current situation.
    electronic_beat has explained it very well with most useful links, thanks!
    But just to be clear, when you use OAuth, you don't enter your credentials on the third party site.
    For example on the Ogger Club, when you have to login with your Discogs account, you are actually redirected to Discogs, and you enter your credentials on Discogs.
    Then you are redirected back to the Ogger Club, with Discogs basically telling us "this person is who they say they are and can use the system".

    As for the Ogger Club, again electronic_beat is right on the money, thanks again and very well put!
    electronic_beat

    Basically he made his own third party web application that sources some info from Discogs (via API) and adds (and maintains) additional data. This enables additional features, such as the aforementioned easy comparison of collections.

    It is simply an advanced processing of the data Discogs is making available through the API and monthly data dumps.
    I found that I could use most of the features that were requested over the years, and decided to do my own implementation on them, most of them being simple display/processing tasks.

    electronic_beat

    Whether Discogs will copy the interface (or license it, or hire him...) only Staff can say. Judging by the slowness of bug fixing and addition of new features to Discogs, I would not bet on it, unless Ogger Club adds a monetization strategy (or gets acquired) and Discogs starts to feel the heat.

    I'm sure this won't be the case, as there's no plans of monetization, and moreover the Ogger Club is definitely not intended to be a competition to Discogs, but merely an extension for people who need more advanced interaction with the database and their Collection/Wantlist/Inventory.
    I'm actually looking forward to the day when Discogs implements all the missing features and renders the Ogger Club obsolete.

    Some notes on privacy and the data we keep.
    When you log in, we keep locally your Discogs user id, and Discogs username, as well as your email address.
    This is the only Discogs information we keep locally, nothing else.
    Your email address is only needed/used for the Wantlist Email Filter service, users are never contacted.

    Again, this is the only data stored locally, any other personal Discogs data is only kept in the current session and available to you and only to you.
    Your (or other user's) Collection, Wantlist, Inventory, and any other possible future data, is never stored locally.

    Then, there is some extra data not on Discogs that we do keep locally (so this is data about you, but with no relation to Discogs):
    list of "foes" (sellers to block in the wantlist emails), the play log/diary, the results of the intersection system, and the results of text from image extraction.

    Thanks for the interest and I remain available for any other questions.

Log In You must be logged in to post.