• The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    And can you provide data?
  • dubfunkoustic over 4 years ago

    Can you prove that you're not Crosley himself, here to defend his honour? If not, I refuse to engage.
  • Farjenk over 4 years ago

    The wear and tear these things cause is not immediately noticable. It is subtle, but over time, if you play a record a lot, with a lot of weight on the cartridge/stylus/needle you will eventually see visible damage to the record in the form of "groove wear" which presents as white discoloration of the grooves. And you can hear it when it gets that bad. Most Crosley/suitcase turntables don't have counter weights at all! Not to mention anti-skate to help prevent inner or outer groove to wear/wear faster.
  • viandy over 4 years ago

    The end of a stylus is in the area of 0.025 mm and composed of material that is harder than a vinyl record. It is made to touch the record surface at a certain angle and a certain downward force. Inexpensive turntables often have a tonearm with a fixed angle and no weight adjustment. If a cartridge requiring a different angle or tracking weight is installed, or the right stylus is installed incorrectly, the record will be damaged.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    But that's the case for any turntable right?

    I mean all needles dragged across vinyl is friction right, and the diamond is gonna win in the friction right? Or am I misunderstanding
  • Jarren over 4 years ago

    I love the cute little motorised things that play vinyls.

    So funny when they do something like this: https://youtu.be/LPIJVdQkb1Q?t=168

    I don't mind scratches on my vinyls, it adds to their charm. Besides, vinyls are supposed to sound scratchy and skip a few times.
  • Korpse over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    I mean all needles dragged across vinyl is friction right, and the diamond is gonna win in the friction right? Or am I misunderstanding

    Yes, any turntable works by dragging the needle along the groove in the record. But most decent turntables have anti-skate mechanisms to prevent damage to the side wall of the groove, and downforce adjustments so that only the minimum of pressure is exerted at the bottom of the groove - the tone arm is balanced so that the pressure at the needle is typically in the range of .5 - 1.5 grams.

    "Suitcase" type record players like Crosleys have no anti-skate adjustment, and no downforce adjustment, and no facility for balancing the tonearm. So they exert much more force on the record than aturntable with adjustments. They will wear a record out a LOT quicker than would otherwise happen. Of course, you're probably not going to notice on a "suitcase" turntable, because the built-in speakers will be pretty rubbish as well.
  • sommortyme over 4 years ago

    I am giving you visible proof. All of what has been said here is correct. For your reference, when he talks about a conic stylus tracking at 5 grams that's yours.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4_GYfPZfq0
  • DarreLP over 4 years ago

    The 'scientific proof' is popping into nearly any online forum and counting the number of "why is my new Crosley skipping on all my new records!?" questions that are posted.
  • dolphyfan over 4 years ago

    The OP seems to really want to hear something other than the advice given. To this, I suggest he conduct his own experiment: Keep the Crosley and play your records on it. No need to muck up your apparent desires with reams of hard-earned knowledge and consistent anecdotal evidence from fellow record collectors. If you're happy, stay happy.
  • Clogwhistle over 4 years ago

    Jarren
    vinyls are supposed to sound scratchy and skip a few times.

    I take it you're being ironic here.
  • Jarren over 4 years ago

    Clogwhistle
    I take it you're being ironic here.


    I'm mildly offended you had to ask.
  • The_Beatles. over 4 years ago

    I have some sympathy with the OP as the faff involved in getting the turntable, amp and speakers all performing correctly can be a drag.

    As an alternative you could try moving to a house situated on an old graveyard and if your lucky your records play themselves as shown here.

    You'll have to put up with trees and toy clowns that attack the kids, a portal to hell in the wardrobe and visits from midgets with conflicting advice about whether you should or shouldn't go to the light but hey it's a small price to pay.
  • The_Beatles. over 4 years ago

    Edit: A spooky double-post. I really didn't do it!
  • brunorepublic over 4 years ago

    brunorepublic edited over 4 years ago
    Styli vary in size, the finer ones are more expensive but are better at tracking sibilant sounds and inner grooves. A large conical stylus, like the kind found preinstalled on many cheap turntables, cannot physically fit into the tight modulations of bright and sibilant sounds, particularly at the end of a side. The resulting effects are buzzing distortion on vocals and harsh noise on hi-hats, sibilant vocal sounds, etc. When such a stylus shape is combined with a high vertical tracking force, the result is that it simply shaves away the groove modulations which it can’t navigate, so the distortion becomes permanently carved into the record.

    I can always tell when I’ve got a record which has been played a lot on these or an equivalent (many cheap consumer tables in the 60s and 70s were just as bad). They can look perfect but the sibilant sounds resemble someone tearing paper, and the overall sound turns to mud as the groove gets closer to the center of the disc.

    I'm not a seller of records, and I'm not and have never been a seller of audio equipment. My only agenda is to stop people from destroying records.

    Oh, and I'm not saying you need to spend a fortune to get decent sound; lord knows my set-up is far from high-end. But Crosleys et al really do destroy records, and since most of them have zero ability to adjust the tonearm or improve the cartridge, there's nothing that can be done to mitigate it. You might as well play your records with a rusty nail.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    dubfunkoustic
    Can you prove that you're not Crosley himself, here to defend his honour? If not, I refuse to engage.


    I think I can probably prove that I am not crosley, since crosley is a woman
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    brunorepublic
    Styli vary in size, the finer ones are more expensive but are better at tracking sibilant sounds and inner grooves. A large conical stylus, like the kind found preinstalled on many cheap turntables, cannot physically fit into the tight modulations of bright and sibilant sounds, particularly at the end of a side. The resulting effects are buzzing distortion on vocals and harsh noise on hi-hats, sibilant vocal sounds, etc. When such a stylus shape is combined with a high vertical tracking force, the result is that it simply shaves away the groove modulations which it can’t navigate, so the distortion becomes permanently carved into the record.

    I can always tell when I’ve got a record which has been played a lot on these or an equivalent (many cheap consumer tables in the 60s and 70s were just as bad). They can look perfect but the sibilant sounds resemble someone tearing paper, and the overall sound turns to mud as the groove gets closer to the center of the disc.

    I'm not a seller of records, and I'm not and have never been a seller of audio equipment. My only agenda is to stop people from destroying records.

    Oh, and I'm not saying you need to spend a fortune to get decent sound; lord knows my set-up is far from high-end. But Crosleys et al really do destroy records, and since most of them have zero ability to adjust the tonearm or improve the cartridge, there's nothing that can be done to mitigate it. You might as well play your records with a rusty nail.


    this is not my first table, I have had 70s sony, AT lp120, crosley and another similar. I don't notice any of those issues, you mentioned.

    Because you have bought some damaged records does not really mean they were played with a specific table, it could have been a high end table that was not set up correctly with too much weight dialed in
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    dolphyfan
    The OP seems to really want to hear something other than the advice given. To this, I suggest he conduct his own experiment: Keep the Crosley and play your records on it. No need to muck up your apparent desires with reams of hard-earned knowledge and consistent anecdotal evidence from fellow record collectors. If you're happy, stay happy.


    this is my second one, I have a record I am very familiar with, smells like teen spirit 45, which I know almost every strum, drum hit etc. I have played it probably 100 times (on Crosley)over three or four years and listening on a AT lp120 with headhones I cannot hear any damage, certainly not the immediate melting people seem to think happens after listen 2 on these tables.

    Theres tons of data on Vinyl vs CD, and all that. comparisons of different sound profiles of different pressings, but nobody can seen to come up with any definitive data to back up these very popular opinions. Surely if I said my Toyota is faster than that twin turbo Porsche, it would be easy to disprove.
  • brunorepublic over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    Because you have bought some damaged records does not really mean they were played with a specific table, it could have been a high end table that was not set up correctly with too much weight dialed in


    That's true. However, whereas a high-end table which is not properly configured can damage records, a cheap turntable *will* damage records.

    That you cannot hear any damage after 100 plays does nothing to convince me; for I routinely come across people who can't tell mono from stereo, don't notice if one of their speakers is wired out of phase, think that horrible sibilant distortion is "part of the warmth of vinyl", or insist that a 128 kbps MP3 is as good as, if not better, than CD.
  • StayAwhileVinyl over 4 years ago

    If I remember right and please feel free to correct me if I'm wrong but the tone arm is too short and struggles hen it gets towards the centre[of the record] and the tone can't balance too well
  • Farjenk over 4 years ago

    Obviously anti-skate and counterweights are completely unnecessary and just a big scam. We've all been duped.

    I'm assuming the OP is also a climate change denier.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    This is what happened to 82 percent of your stores used LPs,
    https://youtu.be/ZaTv93HF8js
  • foogoo over 4 years ago

    Might not damage your vinyl but your cred will never be the same
  • coldwar1977 over 4 years ago

    I've been playing records for almost 25 years on a cheap (180 $) Technics turntable with fixed tonearm.
    No problems or damage whatsoever. Maybe I just got lucky?
  • cooterlee over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    dubfunkousticCan you prove that you're not Crosley himself, here to defend his honour? If not, I refuse to engage.

    I think I can probably prove that I am not crosley, since crosley is a woman


    Powel Crosley, who started the whole enterprise back in the 1900s, had a penis. Crosley Radio, the current iteration of the company that markets the one-stop record players you enjoy, is run by a man.

    Crosley Radio, by the way, introduced an entire line of nicer turntables a few years ago expressly because they realize that a lot of people are much, much more discerning than others. How do I know this? Because they told me. They are based in my town and I wrote a story about their history and success.

    Listen, your username checks out. You're OCD about Crosley Cruisers. We get it. Crosley makes Cruisers for people who just don't care that much about sound quality and don't mind some damage, whether it's minor or significant. That's clearly you and that's fine.

    I've heard "Teen Spirit" on a Crosley and I've heard it on my stereo. Those are extremely different experiences by any measure. If you've heard a record played on a legitimate system and just don't care then, by all means, keep not caring. But please stop trying to get people who do care admit that we're wrong.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    fact anybody got any facts
  • leeving over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    fact anybody got any facts


    Seems like you want someone to take some photos with an electron microscope or something. Why don't you do your own investigating and compare your Crosley with a different turntable and see for yourself.
  • sommortyme over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    fact anybody got any facts


    I gave you a link to a UTUBE video that has microscope pictures of record grooves showing wear after 50 plays. It seems like after reading all your responses, you want to argue with the community rather than be informed. No, I will not get and play my records on a Crosley..
  • DarreLP over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    fact anybody got any facts


    re-read this entire thread.
  • viandy over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    this is my second one, I have a record I am very familiar with, smells like teen spirit 45, which I know almost every strum, drum hit etc. I have played it probably 100 times (on Crosley)over three or four years and listening on a AT lp120 with headhones I cannot hear any damage, certainly not the immediate melting people seem to think happens after listen 2 on these tables.

    I am waiting for proof that records are unharmed after you play them on your Crosley. You say one person played one record an estimated number of times over period of time which isn't known with certainty, then listens to that same record on a different turntable with headphones. Is there a symbolic meaning behind it, or a significance in some way?
    If the number of plays was known, and the period of time that used, and then it was played on a reference system with a specified accuracy, then quantifiable measurements could have been recorded. Those values could then be compared with the data from a control. The control data would need to have been collected from the one record before it was played on the Crosley, or from another copy which was identical to the "Crosley" one before it had been played. Then there would be evidence of one record's condition after having been played on a Crosley. If the results were promising you could repeat the testing and To gain evidence to support your claim.
  • soapysophie over 4 years ago

    In short- all record players wear records. Good players will wear them slowly. Cheapo players like crosleys are like the Usain Bolt of record-wrecking.
  • Bradx over 4 years ago

    This site appears to have some facts: http://best-turntables.com/avoid-crosley-turntables/

    It stands to reason that a turntable arm that tracks at 4.5g will wear records faster than an arm that tracks at 1.5g.
  • radiojohn over 4 years ago

    From Wikipedia:
    "Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder where people feel the need to check things repeatedly, perform certain routines repeatedly (called "rituals"), or have certain thoughts repeatedly."
    @ The_Vinyl_Minimalist
  • kurts.ear.candy over 4 years ago

    The only proof to be found is in your wallet.

    You usually only get what you pay for. As long as you are happy and not pissing off yer neighbors, then life can't get any better.

    But please try and take the following advice without insisting on any proof ... never, ever pee into the wind.

    Check please ...
  • DrunkDragon over 4 years ago

    YINGLISH, is that you?
  • Staff 3.4k

    nik over 4 years ago

    sommortyme
    I am giving you visible proof. All of what has been said here is correct. For your reference, when he talks about a conic stylus tracking at 5 grams that's yours.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4_GYfPZfq0


    Good video. I do cringe if the needle weight goes over 2.5 grams, and that is good confirmation.

    Of course a slightly heavier needle won't destroy a record in 1 play, but it is not helping at all.

    Another issue with cheaper decks is the arm bearings. If they are stiff or loose, that won't help. But excess needle weight or a worn / damaged needle are the worst.

    The cheapest end of the market is always problematic, be it turntables, bicycles, musical instruments, whatever. They may look like what they are supposed to look like, and kinda do what they are supposed to do, but they risk reducing the enjoyment of what you are doing to the point that you stop doing it, hurt yourself, damage something etc. I would always recommend going for something about double the price (obviously picking a good product as well), because the value will be much greater whatever way you look at it. Double it again, better still. After that you get into diminishing returns, which is fine for the 'upgrade' once you are really into the chosen activity. If money is really tight, choosing a secondhand product wisely is a good call, especially if you are a little technical / mechanical and can service the item yourself.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    brunorepublic
    Styli vary in size, the finer ones are more expensive but are better at tracking sibilant sounds and inner grooves. A large conical stylus, like the kind found preinstalled on many cheap turntables, cannot physically fit into the tight modulations of bright and sibilant sounds, particularly at the end of a side. The resulting effects are buzzing distortion on vocals and harsh noise on hi-hats, sibilant vocal sounds, etc. When such a stylus shape is combined with a high vertical tracking force, the result is that it simply shaves away the groove modulations which it can’t navigate, so the distortion becomes permanently carved into the record.

    I can always tell when I’ve got a record which has been played a lot on these or an equivalent (many cheap consumer tables in the 60s and 70s were just as bad). They can look perfect but the sibilant sounds resemble someone tearing paper, and the overall sound turns to mud as the groove gets closer to the center of the disc.

    I'm not a seller of records, and I'm not and have never been a seller of audio equipment. My only agenda is to stop people from destroying records.

    Oh, and I'm not saying you need to spend a fortune to get decent sound; lord knows my set-up is far from high-end. But Crosleys et al really do destroy records, and since most of them have zero ability to adjust the tonearm or improve the cartridge, there's nothing that can be done to mitigate it. You might as well play your records with a rusty nail.


    I tried playing the records with a rusty nail. as per your suggestion/ It makes some very interesting sounds very similar to early Eisturzende Neubaten.
  • radiojohn over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    Eisturzende Neubaten.


    You tried to write: Einstürzende Neubauten?
  • Fauni-Gena over 4 years ago

    So much bunk in this thread. Your cheap turntables have the sensitivity of a meat grinder. That's fine. They are wonderful and will not hurt your vinyl. In fact, actual meat grinders can be converted into turntables easily and will save you money. The little vinyl flecks that come off aren't necessary anyway and they are quite tasty.
  • dolphyfan over 4 years ago

    Fauni-Gena
    they are quite tasty


    I always wondered why something we like was called a "tasty tune". Now I know. Thanks, Fauni-Gena!
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    radiojohn
    COLLECTINGisOCDEisturzende Neubaten.

    don't be pedantic. this is not the scrabble thread

    You tried to write: Einstürzende Neubauten?
  • JigJin over 4 years ago

    I may not be an expert on the subject, but I feel the damage that may or may not be caused lies in the counterweight in the arm. If there is no counterweight, then there will be some damage. Any counterweight is better than none, in this case, and depending on just how effective it is, will factor into the amount of damage your record receives over time.
  • DarreLP over 4 years ago

    JigJin
    lies in the counterweight in the arm


    There’s a lot of factors but one of them is excessive tracking force. Some tables use counterweights so you can adjust the force. Some are pre-set properly (p-mount) and don’t need a counterweight.

    And then there’s the cheap tables we’re talking about, which use a spring, can’t be adjusted, and more often than not are tracking way heavier than need be.
  • JigJin over 4 years ago

    DarreLP
    JigJinlies in the counterweight in the arm

    There’s a lot of factors but one of them is excessive tracking force. Some tables use counterweights so you can adjust the force. Some are pre-set properly (p-mount) and don’t need a counterweight.

    And then there’s the cheap tables we’re talking about, which use a spring, can’t be adjusted, and more often than not are tracking way heavier than need be.


    As I said, I'm no expert, but that sounds about right. Thanks for the info.
  • Zerimas over 4 years ago

    [url=https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=cheap+record+player+ruin+records ]Here is a video showing the damage done to record after being played repeatedly on cheap turntable[/url]. Is that scientific enough for you? He plays the record a hundred times on cheap player. You can hear the added surface noise and you can see it visually when he runs it into the computer.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    Zerimas
    [url=https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=cheap+record+player+ruin+records ]Here is a video showing the damage done to record after being played repeatedly on cheap turntable[/url]. Is that scientific enough for you? He plays the record a hundred times on cheap player. You can hear the added surface noise and you can see it visually when he runs it into the computer.

    Did YOU watch the video, what it shows is ALL turntables damage records after 100 plays
  • Zerimas over 4 years ago

    Wrong link. Here is the correct one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=357L0SbUuME

    It shows that the album played 100 times on the non-cheap turntable was fine.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    sommortyme
    COLLECTINGisOCDfact anybody got any facts

    I gave you a link to a UTUBE video that has microscope pictures of record grooves showing wear after 50 plays. It seems like after reading all your responses, you want to argue with the community rather than be informed. No, I will not get and play my records on a Crosley..


    50 plays seems like an insane amount of play on one record. There are maybe two records I might play 50 times, most will get 2-10 plays and then move on to something else. there is so much good music out there, it seems silly to get hung up on not being able to play a record a 100 times. do you all read your books 50 times, tv shows 50 times?
  • radiojohn over 4 years ago

    https://www.discogs.com/release/218865-All-Lights-Fucked-On-The-Hairy-Amp-Drooling/reviews#c843646
    "I have handed over the tape to the lawyers in exchange for an undisclosed sum,"
    Must have been just a few bucks, so you only have been able to buy a miserable "Crosley"?
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    The whole tape thin. Is a big joke. Get over yourself
  • Fauni-Gena over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    50 plays seems like an insane amount of play on one record.

    Too funny. I love music. Favorites have been listened to hundreds of times over the past 35-40 years, as in many hundreds. who buys records or CDs just to listen to them a few times? That seems insane to me.
    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    Is a big joke. Get over yourself

    Talking to yourself?
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    Fauni-Gena
    COLLECTINGisOCD50 plays seems like an insane amount of play on one record.
    Too funny. I love music. Favorites have been listened to hundreds of times over the past 35-40 years, as in many hundreds. who buys records or CDs just to listen to them a few times? That seems insane to me.

    I love music, and have listened to hundreds of albums hundreds of times in my teens, 20s,30s and that's why I think this approach is flawed, I like to revisit stuff from time to time, but for me the true passion of being a music lover is always trying something new, and pushing yourself into new areas that challenge you as a listener.

    COLLECTINGisOCDIs a big joke. Get over yourself
    Talking to yourself?
  • sommortyme over 4 years ago

    [quote=COLLECTINGisOCD][/quote]

    You must be young. Go ahead play your music on your cheap Crosley. Fifty times playing is nothing, especially if you live past 20. I had played many of my records more than 50xs, before I was 20 and am now 65. I just didn't play my LPs on a portable record player with VTF of 3.5-7.0g.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    [quote=sommortyme][/quote]
    I bought my first LP Van Halens with the smoking baby when I was 10, I am not a newbie
    I am 43 and have been a radio all vinyl DJ in the 90s on college radio, I have used all sorts of equipment, just not that into obsessing over the gear
  • viandy over 4 years ago

  • sommortyme over 4 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    [quote=sommortyme]

    I bought my first LP Van Halens with the smoking baby when I was 10, I am not a newbie
    I am 43 and have been a radio all vinyl DJ in the 90s on college radio, I have used all sorts of equipment, just not that into obsessing over the gear[/quote]

    Sorry didn't mean to imply that you were under 20. I meant that you are younger than myself. I too am not obsessed with gear, just not running my LPs on a portable. Since you DJ'd, I have a Technics SL1200 MK3, which has the S arm abliity to swap out the cartridges. Your original question was a request for proof, now it appears you just like stirring the pot.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 4 years ago

    [quote=nik][/quote]
    After further reading on this topic it seems it is common knowledge among the super high end audiophile types that too light does more damage than too heavy. If you have a cartridge/ tonearm designed to run at 3.0g running it at 2.5 is way worse than running it at 4g.
    The too light weight allows the stylus to bounce around on the groove walls- quoted from Michael Fremmer
  • dolphyfan over 4 years ago

    This thread has been both amusing, and appalling, and has probably long since run it's course.

    To sum up: Driving your car ages it and wears its component parts so eventually you'll have to replace it. Consequently, you have three options: 1) keep it under a tarp in the garage for decades until you can sell it as a pristine classic. 2) Drive it like a normal careful person and try to get the most and best service out of it that you can. 3) Drive it hard, with no concern for wear or maintenance, since it's going to die eventually anyway (just like those well-cared-for cars eventually will.)

    Whether you side with Mama bear, Papa bear, or Goldilocks was none of our business... until the OP asked for an opinion.
  • Pheenixx over 4 years ago

    Agreed. It's all down to personal opinion but the facts are there for all to see.
  • aloexvera over 3 years ago

    Lesson Learned: Don’t buy any records from the OP.

    Thankfully they only have CDs listed.
  • wilky77 over 3 years ago

    aloexvera
    Lesson Learned: Don’t buy any records from the OP.

    Thankfully they only have CDs listed.


    Well said. This thread was entertaining if nothing else.

    you can put a turd in a box and stamp a guarantee on it but all your getting is guaranteed piece of sh!t
  • steodorovich over 3 years ago

    I'm new to this forum and to Discogs, but very very old to vinyl - starting in the mid-70's. I have to say, I find it almost adorable when kids today decide to "discover" vinyl and ask what were silly questions even when I bought my first record at 13. My parents had one of those whomper heavy stereo consoles on which they'd play their Ferrante & Teicher and Andre Kostelanetz, and I saw how worn and beat to hell they were - which is why I made sure to save money from my summer jobs to buy a receiver, turntable, and speakers for my records. They weren't top end, but they weren't garbage.

    The result is I still have albums 40+ years old that have a lovely black sheen and no skips, hissing, pops, or sibilance. Meanwhile, those albums my parents had for 5 - 10 years they played on that console are unlistenable.

    The thing is, I didn't need to ask such a basic question about turntables -- it was (and still is) intuitive. I cannot imagine the OP was serious. He seems like the sort of guy who is either pridefully ignorant, just a troll, or some poor sucker who desperately needs someone to tell him he didn't make a huge mistake.

    Kids.
  • rugogs over 3 years ago

    steodorovich
    I'm new to this forum and to Discogs, but very very old to vinyl - starting in the mid-70's. I have to say, I find it almost adorable when kids today decide to "discover" vinyl and ask what were silly questions even when I bought my first record at 13. My parents had one of those whomper heavy stereo consoles on which they'd play their Ferrante & Teicher and Andre Kostelanetz, and I saw how worn and beat to hell they were - which is why I made sure to save money from my summer jobs to buy a receiver, turntable, and speakers for my records. They weren't top end, but they weren't garbage.

    The result is I still have albums 40+ years old that have a lovely black sheen and no skips, hissing, pops, or sibilance. Meanwhile, those albums my parents had for 5 - 10 years they played on that console are unlistenable.

    The thing is, I didn't need to ask such a basic question about turntables -- it was (and still is) intuitive. I cannot imagine the OP was serious. He seems like the sort of guy who is either pridefully ignorant, just a troll, or some poor sucker who desperately needs someone to tell him he didn't make a huge mistake.

    Kids.


    Ja.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 3 years ago

    steodorovich
    I'm new to this forum and to Discogs, but very very old to vinyl - starting in the mid-70's. I have to say, I find it almost adorable when kids today decide to "discover" vinyl and ask what were silly questions even when I bought my first record at 13. My parents had one of those whomper heavy stereo consoles on which they'd play their Ferrante & Teicher and Andre Kostelanetz, and I saw how worn and beat to hell they were - which is why I made sure to save money from my summer jobs to buy a receiver, turntable, and speakers for my records. They weren't top end, but they weren't garbage.

    The result is I still have albums 40+ years old that have a lovely black sheen and no skips, hissing, pops, or sibilance. Meanwhile, those albums my parents had for 5 - 10 years they played on that console are unlistenable.

    The thing is, I didn't need to ask such a basic question about turntables -- it was (and still is) intuitive. I cannot imagine the OP was serious. He seems like the sort of guy who is either pridefully ignorant, just a troll, or some poor sucker who desperately needs someone to tell him he didn't make a huge mistake.

    Kids.


    I the OP, am 44 and grew up with records as my
    Only
    Medium until tapes were cheaper.
    I also have been an on air radio vinyl DJ in the 90s (
    Not to be hipster, that's what the
    Labels sent us)

    So for you to assume this post is an ignorant kid shows YOUR bias.

    And we are VERY impressed with your understanding of basic audio concepts.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 3 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist edited over 3 years ago
    ...........
  • rugogs over 3 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist
    Take a LONG walk off a short pier.

    Indeed!
  • steodorovich over 3 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist


    I the OP, am 44 and grew up with records as my
    Only
    Medium until tapes were cheaper.
    I also have been an on air radio vinyl DJ in the 90s (
    Not to be hipster, that's what the
    Labels sent us)

    So for you to assume this post is an ignorant kid shows YOUR bias.

    And we are VERY impressed with your understanding of basic audio concepts.


    Wow. If what you say is true and you still are in doubt about whether a cheap record player damages records then you just proved my point about ignorance. Not to mention calling into question your own understanding of basic audio.

    It's like someone debating about the difference in quality between a low-end all laminate guitar and one with a solid wood top. Clearly your mind is already made up. Enjoy your Crosley.
  • The_Vinyl_Minimalist over 3 years ago

    The_Vinyl_Minimalist edited over 3 years ago
    steodorovich
    DumpingLPs4CDs

    I the OP, am 44 and grew up with records as my
    Only
    Medium until tapes were cheaper.
    I also have been an on air radio vinyl DJ in the 90s (
    Not to be hipster, that's what the
    Labels sent us)

    So for you to assume this post is an ignorant kid shows YOUR bias.

    And we are VERY impressed with your understanding of basic audio concepts.

    Wow. If what you say is true and you still are in doubt about whether a cheap record player damages records then you just proved my point about ignorance. Not to mention calling into question your own understanding of basic audio.

    It's like someone debating about the difference in quality between a low-end all laminate guitar and one with a solid wood top. Clearly your mind is already made up. Enjoy your Crosley.


    I no longer own a TT. You can have all the records.

    This discussion post is about damage not sound quality. Obviously sound quality improves with real gear.
    If you wanna discus guitars, that's probably better somewhere else

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