• edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    AutumnAarilyn
    When cds come back in style, look out! I see nearly every title becoming a $50 disc.


    This topic came up in my other thread and think that it deserves it's own separate thread...

    What is happening now with the CD market and where do you seasoned pros out there expect will happen with this market in the long term?

    I currently have a collection of 700 titles on CD (all classic JAZZ, all in NM)... but right now prices seem very low. Will prices in future continue to fall, or is there a good chance that a resurgence of interest/popularity may occur?

    Thanks!
  • FoundSoundsYYC over 3 years ago

    I suspect collectable and rare items, particularly those from the first wave of CDs will continue to appreciate in value.

    Mass market stuff is just going to stagnate until there’s some sort of broader resurgence like the vinyl revival. Even then, that’s a maybe.

    CDs are a good business for me, but it’s the rare stuff, not ‘What’s The Story Morning Glory’, a CD so omnipresent I could construct a small house from used copies by this point.

    Your jazz CDs should do well, eventually.
  • Vinyl.Score over 3 years ago

    ^^^ what he said
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    FoundSoundsYYC
    Your jazz CDs should do well, eventually.


    So what I am getting from this comment is a suggestion to just "hang tight" for another decade or more > at which time prices for excellent quality old jazz CDs is likely to go up significantly?

    I'm currently trying to decide whether or not to even bother bringing CDs with my back to Europe now. If I don't, then my traveling will be easier.... ....from the prices I am currently seeing it almost doesn't seem worth it to bother much with CDs at present.
  • FoundSoundsYYC over 3 years ago

    I wouldn’t say another decade, Edward. I expect the CD market to continue to improve over the next year or two. I’ve certainly found an uptick over the last year - not huge, but significant.

    One advantage with CDs is that you’ll be able to ship them lettermail within Canada, so long as you’ve protected them well. That may be the same in Europe, and it will get you over the shipping cost hurdle.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    FoundSoundsYYC
    I wouldn’t say another decade, Edward. I expect the CD market to continue to improve over the next year or two. I’ve certainly found an uptick over the last year - not huge, but significant.


    AHA! Forgive my newbie questions > things which might be obvious to most of you.
    I have not been following 'used music media' markets AT ALL, ever.
    But my assumption is that these markets go in waves and bubbles like all other markets. Can I assume that the main bubble-wave for vinyl has happened and is now is a slow decline? >>>and the CD bubble has yet to happen?

    So might we assume that CD prices are just beginning to go up right now, might perhaps PEAK within 10 year, and then slowly taper off?

    I don't much mind waiting 10 years to begin sell the CDs since it will take me that long to sell my LPs > and if I would get significanly better prices 10 years from now, then I would just wait and relax :)
  • FoundSoundsYYC over 3 years ago

    FoundSoundsYYC edited over 3 years ago
    I don’t know. All things remaining equal, scarce items should continue to accumulate value, but I’m not sure how well that translates to superseded technology over many years. At least, I don’t know how consistent the rise would be, or if there’s more of an advantage in waiting 10 years over 10 months.

    Perhaps a triage system would hedge your bets - sell what has apparent value today, and save others for later. Items can sit on Discogs for a while, and you can adjust prices when needed.
  • cellularsmoke over 3 years ago

    If there's a resurgence of music from the 90s and 00s in a decade or so when online streaming no longer offers that backcatalog the current group of 20 and 30 somethings may try and go buy all the songs they used to stream. You might see an uptick then as well.
  • hookedupsolid over 3 years ago

    hookedupsolid edited over 3 years ago
    I think the CD market is where the cassette market was 10 to 15 years ago. At that time you literally couldn't give tapes away, I was picking stuff up for nothing that now sells for £40 or more. Why has this happened? I don't know, but I would guess on the following factors:
    - Relative scarcity
    - Nostalgic fondness / retro appeal
    - Cheaper alternative to vinyl for those wanting to own an historic release on a physical format

    I remember when I was a kid tapes were so ubiquitous you'd see them spooled out in hegedrows and and bits of broken cassette shells on the road. Similarly CDs are now coasters and bird scarers. The vinyl revival kicked off around 2000, we might be at peak cassette right now. Judging by that I'd guess vintage CDs will gain traction in another 10 to 15 years.

    Having said there will always be rarities across all formats whose value evades the prevailing fads.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    hookedupsolid
    I think the CD market is where the cassette market was 10 to 15 years ago. At that time you literally couldn't give tapes away, I was picking stuff up for nothing that now sells for £40 or more.


    Aha!! The plot thickens and my ignorance becomes more apparent.... SO NOW CASSETTES are selling at high prices???? OMG! Who would ever have guessed that!!

    Sounds like waiting a while on my CDs would be the thing to do...
  • hookedupsolid over 3 years ago

    edwardpowell
    CASSETTES are selling at high prices?


    Yes! But not ALL tapes, naturally. Jazz-wise, certainly modern jazz, blue note in particular, 80s audiophile jazz tapes - they'll sell for £15-30 each.
  • FoundSoundsYYC over 3 years ago

    FoundSoundsYYC edited over 3 years ago
    Cassette prices are another thread in themselves - prices and sales seem to be higher in Europe / elsewhere for those, with North America lagging. At least that’s my experience.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    hookedupsolid
    Yes! But not ALL tapes, naturally. Jazz-wise,


    My Dad also left me probably close to 700 cassettes also, but they are his own copies of his LP recorded onto blank cassettes - unfortunately, obviously those have no value at all. Too bad... the irony is that that is what he listened to and that is now what I listen to. The original LPs and CDs remain untouched and the cassette copies are what gets listened to.
  • Klass.Animal over 3 years ago

    ll read it entirely/answer surely ... later
    (post for memo)
  • GruveRecords over 3 years ago

    A lot of CDs that I used to sell on here for $10-$15 range just a year ago have dropped to prices in the $1-$3 range now. The flood of eBay and Amazon sellers to Discogs has helped tank the market quite. That, and less overall CD buyers has all but killed it.

    I gave up on CDs for the most part early this year. Now I'm mostly putting them in lots of 10-20 on eBay to get around $1.50/ea. They still sell alright in lots by genre.

    Sure, the more rare titles still sell. But many will still sit for months to get the right price. Because buyers know the market is tanking and don't mind waiting for a lower price.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    GruveRecords
    But many will still sit for months to get the right price. Because buyers know the market is tanking and don't mind waiting for a lower price.


    So we have a conflict in opinions here... or could it be that currently we are seeing a major CD bear market > likely followed 10 years from now by a major CD bull market?

    Perhaps it is a good time to actually BUY CDs??
  • pulsemod over 3 years ago

    The only utility a user is really getting from a CD is the art. CDs can't compete with networking technology, on any level. Except***

    The data ripped from any CD was probably put on a server a long time ago. Sorry folks, it's free now, whatever you want to believe otherwise. That being said... The question really is, how will jazz CDs fair? ***Jazz is one of the few transcendent styles of music ever conceived. Jazz is a special genre. What applies to most other music doesn't apply to jazz. It's prestigious and high status. It's esteemed. It's taught, archived, and studied at universities. The people who buy it have disposable incomes and are defacto proud art patrons. Lastly and most importantly, a lot of people who listen to jazz are old. They still like physical formats. So, jazz CDs aren't subject to what a lot of other CDs will be subject to. Keep that in mind.
  • Farjenk over 3 years ago

    It is as always,

    supply ÷ demand x rarity + condition = value
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    All very good points... I do agree that with JAZZ CDs it is not just a question of 'supply & demand'... there is more to it than that...

    ...I also, as I mentioned before, think - regarding CDs vs. *networking technology* - that the music (originally FROM a CD) we can easily download "for free", will almost invariably be an MP3. For those who might not know, the tracks on a CD are in WAV format which are not compressed and take up a huge file size. Basically everything you can download is in a compressed format like and MP3 > and the sound quality of an MP3 is definitely compromised compared to that of a WAV file. So therefore the argument that all CDs have now been uploaded somewhere for free public download does not necessarily mean CDs will not have value because those buyers who want the FULL QUALITY UNCOMPRESSED SOUND will always greatly prefer CDs.
  • IconicMusic over 3 years ago

    IconicMusic edited over 3 years ago
    My two pence worth..

    The only format beyond the CD will be digital. Only when digital becomes the absolute dominant form and stays that way for a good 5-10 years after that will CD's become collectable and I don't think the CD is going away for another decade at least. So you're talking 15-20 years minimum before we see any kind of resurgence and that may be being generous. It might be closer to 30-40 years because.. generations.

    When they do become collectable the CD is so pervasive and people are more aware of future value that there will still be countless of those Oasis CD's around. So their value will never be more than roughly what they are now.. give or take a few pounds/dollars.

    The value I feel is in singles, (rare ones) and EP's and special edition albums in deluxe packs with rare tracks or digipacks with extras. In charity shops I tend to snap up lesser common singles.. always the EP's and very often the digipacks.

    One example.. Katey Perry Single 'Rise' .. It's quite rare... It's expensive now.. and the song is not on any official album of Perry's... when that CD revolution happens... My money is on that becoming worth big money. (Provided her stock increases or maintains itself within the music world... amongst other factors)
  • IconicMusic over 3 years ago

    ..when I say big money.. I just mean roughly double what it's worth now.. maybe more.. which woukd put it at about £40 but clearly it's all just guess work.
  • IconicMusic over 3 years ago

    I couldnt ever see a well known oasis album ever being worth more than £10 in the future. Full circle indeed.
  • GruveRecords over 3 years ago

    edwardpowell
    GruveRecordsBut many will still sit for months to get the right price. Because buyers know the market is tanking and don't mind waiting for a lower price.

    So we have a conflict in opinions here... or could it be that currently we are seeing a major CD bear market > likely followed 10 years from now by a major CD bull market?

    Perhaps it is a good time to actually BUY CDs??


    CD bulk purchases can be easily sourced for around 10 cents cost. Sometimes less. I wouldn't put more than that into them. There's so much available right now on Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, etc. Another reason why the prices keep dropping.

    Also, I sell a lot of Jazz/Blues/R&B music. These are the genres that I'm referring to which have tanked pretty hard compared to a year ago. These CDs just don't move very fast on Discogs anymore. Which is why I throw them up in lots on ebay now. Most of the titles that I'm putting up in lots had prices between $10-$20 in summer of 2017 on Discogs. Now I'm selling 20 CDs for $30 on ebay. I wouldn't be selling in lots if I didn't think the market was crashing, if that tells you anything.

    With that said, there are still some hidden gems in the Jazz genre, but they are becoming few and far between. SACDs are also very collectible for obvious reasons. Many are in this genre. Also target CDs..
  • FoundSoundsYYC over 3 years ago

    This is the thing - I do see several sellers saying that they can’t sell CDs, and that the market is crashing, but that has not been my experience. It’s interesting that there’s such a difference in experiences. I think the CD market has become highly regionalized.

    Even in my own limited travels, i’ve come across places where CDs are dead, and others where they still command a decent price.
  • pulsemod over 3 years ago

    You know, we simply don't know what might happen. Anything could happen. What happens if the media and marketing industries manage to attach status and sex appeal to CDs like they did with records? It happened. It could happen again.
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    pulsemod
    Anything could happen.

    Truth. No one I know has a crystal ball. What you could sell for $$$ one week might only sell for $ the next. Depends who's buying. Enjoy the CDs, but don't expect them to ever have value - unless it's a collectable of some sort. Even then, who's to say? No one I know can see the future. What if the Earth blows up tomorrow?
  • ottologue over 3 years ago

    If I may just chime here...

    I am still picking up CDs which are knowingly (to me) rare + hard to get + in both new & used conditions. Generally, MP3s, ACC Loseless, FLAC & digital music formats have somehow void the music buying processes - for music consumers since the Compact Disc was invented and introduced in to the market. As physical music stores continue to close down by the dozens year-on-year worldwide, music shopping is a process that is becoming obsolete (so it seems).

    With the re-emergence of worldwide demand for 12" vinyl records LPs, and subsequently cassette tapes....these phenomenal breakthroughs in sales + demands are actually reversing the closure of music stores - and there are more new record music stores opening than what was expected. Niche as these stores may be. eg. HMV in Tokyo, Japan sells vinyls, CDs, cassette tapes and MDs - when I was there in June 2018.

    As much as I would like to affirm that there will be a chance for Compact Discs (CD) revival-reborn-remergence back to its glory days, the fact is that today's music consumers are spoiled by Spotifying' Apple Music providers of one-click-instant-download-immediate-gratification-of-music-media-ownership.

    Music collecting costs money, and the logic of spending money on music in this generation - is evolving to be a privilege as opposed to an innate behaviour to drop by Towers Records to pick up new CD album releases by The Rolling Stones, Oasis or Bon Jovi.

    There has been a progressive shift in consumer's psychology in such that daily expenditures have shifted from physical to digital goods, or receiving physical goods through digital-actions - from our Smart phones. The time we used to spend on music buying, music listening, music sharing is a collective behaviour still evolving in this day of Shazam-that-song-now-I-need-the-title. Radio DJs who used to be revered by growing up kids for these artist names, song title tracks are privy to promotional copies played by FM music stations. Today, anyone who follows a recording artist on social media will probably know the 1st single title faster than any worldwide radio DJ.

    The music industry is taking an unprecedented tectonic shift all around, a 360 degree inward-trends-outward-causations that the executives are crunching Big Data all day-every-day trying to predict, control if you will, the way you and I buy music - be it physical or digital.

    I was a Napster 1st generation era' kinda music lover, add Audiogalaxy to the equation too. Buying digital music was never an option, pirating + sharing music was the pinnacle of the music revolution we are facing now. Today, I find myself slipping deeper into the arms of Apple Music - with over 2 more weeks before my 1st Three Months free trial will officially be billed - meaning I will be "officially" a digital music consumer in November. It's the crux of convenience in this digital age that is converting our old perceptions, habits and possibilities into "newly-evolved" ones - and these are the factors which those at the top of the music chain have been researching for the last decade , so as to facilitate the maturity of our involuntary yields to what "they are selling".

    Changes.

    Just have to roll with it - and harmonize our old-with-the-new.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    I can tell you one thing >>> here we have simply been discussing music "formats", and not the music and music making process itself. Myself, having been a profession musician, and recording artist for many decades - I would say that the art of music making itself is greatly at risk > or at least, the art of recorded music. The reason is that there is no money in recorded music anymore. Maybe musicians will eventually find a way around the "freemusicrevolution" but the way it stands now, we aren't making any money. It takes me 800 hours of very hard work to make one CD album, and my profits from that are almost zero. It was much better even 10 years ago.

    In the old days I was highly motivated to compose and put out albums of as great music as I possible could > now I ask myself "why bother". It also seems that very few people are actually even listening to albums anymore.

    I'm not going to launch into a big rant, but I am very much afraid about the future of music itself [and that is saying nothing about how the Equal Temperament Tuning System has now more of less colonized the entire planet, flattening natural and microtonal tuning around the world]
  • eddiel over 3 years ago

    FoundSoundsYYC
    This is the thing - I do see several sellers saying that they can’t sell CDs, and that the market is crashing, but that has not been my experience. It’s interesting that there’s such a difference in experiences. I think the CD market has become highly regionalized.

    Even in my own limited travels, i’ve come across places where CDs are dead, and others where they still command a decent price.


    Maybe it's because of the inventory each seller is trying to move; some titles sell better than others, hence some sellers sell more than others?

    I still have cds and buy them. I've been thinking about a purge for sometime now though. I don't regret my earlier purge in bit and can't even remember what I sold without looking at my inventory records. But I want to keep the stuff I really want and will be hard to replace. I will likely always be able to find Beatles cds (Stereo, I'm keeping my Mono box) or Zeppelin. But I'm not giving up that George Jones cd because without Discogs I wouldn't have been able to find many of them. Country cds are hard to find locally, used or new (old stock).
  • souled.out over 3 years ago

    As a seller of mainly all CDs, I only see a decline in CD single sales
  • dansauk over 3 years ago

    I have around 5600 vinyl for sale here, and around 1600 CD's

    Currently my CD sales vs my vinyl sales are at around 50/50 split
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    pulsemod
    ***Jazz is one of the few transcendent styles of music ever conceived. Jazz is a special genre. What applies to most other music doesn't apply to jazz. It's prestigious and high status. It's esteemed. It's taught, archived, and studied at universities. The people who buy it have disposable incomes and are defacto proud art patrons. Lastly and most importantly, a lot of people who listen to jazz are old. They still like physical formats. So, jazz CDs aren't subject to what a lot of other CDs will be subject to. Keep that in mind.

    Only quoting this, since it's presumptuous to me. I'm sure plenty would beg to differ, and feel "their" non-jazz genres will stand the test of time as well. Even if perhaps in lesser numbers, someone could be studying Ariana Grande in 2387 for reasons we can't ever know... until the great "Ariana Grande Riots of 2386" occur. But, that's for another topic.
  • RockNurse over 3 years ago

    I can cite firsthand experience here, having started as a vinyl collector in the early '70s, transitioned 100% to CDs by the mid '90s (selling off chunks, but not all, of my record collection), and then around 2012 jumping headlong back into vinyl not long after I started managing a record store again. At that point CDs had just about bottomed out - someone trying to sell them to a store or dealer would be lucky to get 50 cents to a buck, and since indie stores, for the most part, are emphasizing vinyl now to an even greater degree, I find that price range still holds.

    HOWEVER... we have also reached the point where now there are tons of in-demand CDs that have gone out of print, from titles that were relatively obscure indies in the first place to major label reissues that boasted rare bonus material or desirable remastering jobs. In my resurgent vinyl mania I had no idea I was sitting on a goldmine until I decided - deja vu time - to start selling off titles from the CD collection on Discogs and eBay. Previously I simply offloaded them wholesale to a dealer pal of mine, mostly netting 10 cents to $1.00 via the understanding that he would buy them in bulk rather than us going through them title by title. But when, out of curiosity, I started researching prices - wow, what an eye opener. In the past few months I have sold at least 40 discs in the $20 to $50 range, and several more like $80 - stuff I typically picked up in the '90s for considerably less than $10. This even includes a few CDRs (mail order our tour-only titles the artists themselves created) and cassettes (super-rare limited editions).

    The larger point is, research as many titles as time allows and you're bound to find some great no-brainers that will fetch premium prices and are on tons of want lists. You'll also find a middle ground of titles where you need to set a "not worth the effort if they go for less than..." mental standard; for me, it's $10, since I can handle ten $10 sales over the course of a few weeks even if a lone $100 sale would have been sweeter; but I'm not interested in working to get twenty $5 sales, if you catch my drift.

    And then take all the other crap to a store or dealer and be willing to take whatever they offer, even if it's 10 cents a CD - that is, unless you are willing to hold on to everything indefinitely and speculate those types of titles will some day rise in price. Me, I'd rather clear the music shelves off and make space for more vinyl! (Memo to self: that Mariah Carey CD left behind at my apartment by an old girlfriend is NEVER gonna be worth more than 10 cents.... )
  • RockNurse over 3 years ago

    By the way... apologies for my above longwindedness, so can I just add that member edwardpowell here, who started this thread, is a brilliant musician and everyone should check out his music. Just google him. Nice to have you join the gang here at Discogs, Edward - I've heard several of your albums and dug 'em.
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    RockNurse
    so can I just add that member edwardpowell here, who started this thread, is a brilliant musician and everyone should check out his music.

    Hey, that's good to know.

    Bottom line: supply & demand. So many variables. All of any one genre won't appreciate or depreciate the same, or of any one anything I imagine, unless it's a scarce mineral or resource or something.
  • IconicMusic over 3 years ago

    RockNurse
    The larger point is, research as many titles as time allows and you're bound to find some great no-brainers that will fetch premium prices and are on tons of want lists. You'll also find a middle ground of titles where you need to set a "not worth the effort if they go for less than..." mental standard; for me, it's $10,


    Yeah I agree, many CD's are just not really worth a sellers time at least right now and I believe for the foreseeable future. I genuinely think most of us will be dead or have one foot in the grave by the time a Mariah Carey standard CD album is worth anything more than a few £$ at most. But indeed some are already valuable and some will become even more valuable much sooner. I mentioned earlier I only pick up EP's, hard to find singles and rare albums especially in didgi-type-packs. I bought an album for about $€30 (from memory).. Rain Parade, perfume river. Live performance limited run. It's value will only go up.. even if it is "only" CD.

    And to someone who said singles will never hold any value... well.. even some 7" singles today go for a hefty sum.. at least the right ones. CD singles will be no different. Especially for songs that never appeared on an album.
  • Weareonenation303 over 3 years ago

    Some CDs are ridiculously expensive. Rarities are likely to remain at premium prices unless the format suffers a massive decline. One issue I find with the format is CD rot destroying everything in the foreseeable future. That alone prevents me from investing tons of money on rarities. Many CDs manufactured on the 80's to early 90s will probably succumb to the accursed rot in the next 10-15 years.
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    If my '80s to early '90s CDs survived up 'til now (not from PDO UK), I'd expect them to last my lifetime.
  • sublemon over 3 years ago

    I think most CDs will last 100+ years. There will definitely be more that fail as the decades go by, but many will be fine for a couple lifetimes.

    I think, non-mainstream titles, rare items by mainstream artists etc. are going up in value now. If they are out of print it is currently unlikely they will be reissued on CD. Maybe vinyl and download, but I don't see a lot CD reissues. Common discs have bottomed out but I don't think they will go up soon or ever. Just like LP $1 (or less) bins are still full of that not many people want (e.g. Leo Sayer LPs, Pablo Cruise, and tons of other 70s rock/pop).
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    RockNurse
    Edward - I've heard several of your albums and dug 'em.


    Thanks so much RockNurse :) ...maybe one day the boxes of my own CDs at home will be worth a fortune one day :D :D ...the FriedSitar CD is now totally out of print. edit: OMG I just googled this and it is now going for $62 on Amazon! Go figure!!
  • PabloPlato over 3 years ago

    I'm curious, I don't stream music but maybe some of you who do can answer - is there anything that you generally won't find on streaming services? are CD singles and EPs generally available or not? my coworkers generally all stream, and i am constantly playing music ripped from my CD collection, often from artists they are really into and that are not obscure (Flaming Lips, Belle & Sebastian, PJ Harvey, etc.) but they are hearing unfamiliar songs taken from singles and EPs all the time. are these releases not available to stream? is the focus strictly on the albums, and then, only the standard tracklist?
  • IconicMusic over 3 years ago

    PabloPlato
    is the focus strictly on the albums, and then, only the standard tracklist?


    From my limited experience you will find pretty much everything on streaming including remixes you won't find on any physical album. Not to mention the countless "albums" that are only available for streaming and download especially by dance music artists.

    Does anyone know why those kinds of artists only seem to ever release music for streaming? Costs? Practicality?

    Personally I don't think I will ever appreciate streaming music as "proper" albums. I know, I know, many of you do and will always.. Well I just will never. I think there is just something misleading about streaming and download.

    If you stream you own nothing. You may as well listen on YouTube. If you download you own nothing still, apart from the right to own a digital copy and considering that it costs NOTHING to reproduce that song or album and send it to you... they must be making considerable profit than they would have done in the past. Of course the artists love streaming and download because it cuts their costs considerably. No manufacturing, no distribution, no fees to the shops, no middle men, just make the music, record it and the rest is pure profit.

    Can you tell I'm not a fan?
  • 8892sales over 3 years ago

    PabloPlato
    is there anything that you generally won't find on streaming services?
    Thirty year old obscure electronic music which was self-released and never got a wider release on major labels for a start.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    edwardpowell edited over 3 years ago
    IconicMusic
    Does anyone know why those kinds of artists only seem to ever release music for streaming? Costs? Practicality?


    As an independent recording artist myself I can tell you a bit about my experience with streaming. What I have done in the past, and what most/many artists like myself have done when releasing new music has been to release a new album thru CDBABY or other such website. CDBABY gives you several options regarding "digital distribution" ranging from only selling MP3s on only the CDBABY site itself, > to also included only a few reputable sites such as iTunes, > to sending it to MANY streaming sites as long as they "pay", > to basically sending it to EVERY site even if they don't pay at all... so as an artist you must decide. The advantage of basically giving it away is you get greater exposure.

    CDBABY has a "recommended" option in which they send it everywhere that "pays". Generally this is what I have done. But I have been disappointed with the results, because "paying" usually means I the artist get $0.01 per play or something absurd like this. CDBABY sends me a cheque every time my sales reach $100, and the last time it had hundreds of entries... meaning hundreds of plays, but from all of those I got basically nothing. What really made up the bulk of the $100 were the few physical CD sales and MP3 downloads.

    Just an aside funny, but depressing, story is that I have been making CDs for year and years and not really noticed much by my brother's kids (now adults) - until one day my niece discovered me on SPOTIFY, and from that day onwards she began to recognize me as a 'real' artist. She somehow in her mind equated 'being on Spotify' as meaning 'making it big'.... hahahaha... I have no idea how my music got onto Spotify and can only assume that CDBABY must have put it there as part of our "digital distribution" agreement.... fine, what the hell. On my last statement there were a lot of plays from Spotify but I made perhaps $1 in total, if that.

    So, no, artists do not love streaming --- streaming is killing the artists' profit, and thereby killing the artists' motivation to create more music. As I said in an earlier post - this situation is having the effect of literally killing the creation of new music. I have been watching this happen with all the many musician friends and colleagues I have all over the world, and noticed it in myself also. It is a massive far-reaching crisis in the making..... after it is all over humanity will look back on the musical era between 1950 and 2000 as one of the great Golden Eras of music, all stimulated by commercialization and profitability (for the ARTISTS) of music.

    So I myself, and artists like me do not anymore release music in any physical formats - rather just as MP3 downloads and/or streaming.
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    8892sales
    Thirty year old obscure electronic music which was self-released and never got a wider release on major labels for a start.

    A gazillion indie releases from the pre-Web era aren't available for streaming. But...

    IconicMusic
    You may as well listen on YouTube.

    Fans often upload their tracks, sourcing from vinyl, tape, demos, whatever, to YouTube. YouTube is far and away the best source for all sorts of obscurities. True, the quality may vary - but it's often quite good to excellent, and again the selection is second to none.

    The Web, of course, has caused all sorts of artists to crawl out of the woodwork, so to speak. Bands who haven't played together in decades, are reborn - thanks to renewed interest in them created by the Web, and a new legion of fans is born. Even still, underground artists who haven't received any current acclaim, realize they're bored of their daily 9-to-5, and pickup that old guitar tossed away years ago in the garage, or buy some new gear, or dust off the old - and feel that creative spark, those juices flowing again - and post the fruits of these recent endeavors online, to whomever might stop by for a quick click-and-hear-see. It's quite amazing, actually.

    Plus, there's the labels factor - if it's new, it's likely streamed. If not, it's very hit or miss. Meaning...

    PabloPlato
    is the focus strictly on the albums, and then, only the standard tracklist?

    Often yes, in my experience. Of course, it simply depends.

    PabloPlato
    are CD singles and EPs generally available or not?

    Absolutely NOT, I'd say. Again, it simply depends what one's looking for. YouTube will have it, I can almost guarantee.
  • souled.out over 3 years ago

    PabloPlato
    is there anything that you generally won't find on streaming services?


    Let's be honest. There's still loads of music out there that is not even available for download let alone streaming. That's what, in part, is keeping physical sales strong.
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    souled.out
    That's what, in part, is keeping physical sales strong.

    I imagine it's all relative, with niche markets vastly outperforming what's on the charts. But, I really haven't looked into it.
  • sybilste over 3 years ago

    GruveRecords
    A lot of CDs that I used to sell on here for $10-$15 range just a year ago have dropped to prices in the $1-$3 range now. The flood of eBay and Amazon sellers to Discogs has helped tank the market quite. That, and less overall CD buyers has all but killed it.

    I gave up on CDs for the most part early this year. Now I'm mostly putting them in lots of 10-20 on eBay to get around $1.50/ea. They still sell alright in lots by genre.

    Sure, the more rare titles still sell. But many will still sit for months to get the right price. Because buyers know the market is tanking and don't mind waiting for a lower price.

    What is your ebay handle ??
  • GruveRecords over 3 years ago

    sybilste
    GruveRecordsA lot of CDs that I used to sell on here for $10-$15 range just a year ago have dropped to prices in the $1-$3 range now. The flood of eBay and Amazon sellers to Discogs has helped tank the market quite. That, and less overall CD buyers has all but killed it.

    I gave up on CDs for the most part early this year. Now I'm mostly putting them in lots of 10-20 on eBay to get around $1.50/ea. They still sell alright in lots by genre.

    Sure, the more rare titles still sell. But many will still sit for months to get the right price. Because buyers know the market is tanking and don't mind waiting for a lower price.
    What is your ebay handle ??


    It's the same Gruverecords
  • Plastic-Demons over 3 years ago

    My own inventory used to be predominantly vinyl based until a year or two ago, then I removed approx 4,000 items of vinyl in favour of listing CD's and Cassettes instead. From a total inventory amount of about 12,500 items back then 50% of them were vinyl, now at just over 8,000 items CD's account for about 5,000 items with Cassettes another 1,000, so vinyl is only 25% of the total and that's going to keep declining.
    CD sales are worth way more to me than sales of vinyl was, and the actual value of the orders received now is much better than it was. The amount of orders I get in a month is still fairly similar, but whereas I had one month in which 70 orders for vinyl generated only $22.21 in commission payable, another month more recently saw 67 orders for mainly CD's generate a commission fee payable of $110.59 instead, that's for the same amount of work on my behalf maybe even less as CD's are easier to pack and ship, though we're talking about specialist collectors CD's and CD sets, not chart album CD's or the usual Charity shop reject titles.
  • djcarbines over 3 years ago

    The market (now), in charity shops at least is diverging with CDs. As it previously did with vinyl - some shops I know practically give them away (20p each / 4 for £1 etc), others price accordingly £1 per disc (doubles are £2 etc), even when they don't add value or were the same price as a single disc new.

    My predictions for long-term valuable CD?
    Any singles with exclusive tracks that are not on digital services. The bigger / more collected (rather than listened to / by streaming etc) the artist, will be a multiplying factor.
    Many post-download era CD Singles are already quite expensive (£10/£20+)

    I'm personally collecting every UK hit single and album on original format - ever!
    So if anyone is selling CD singles by the hundred, let me know!
  • zero_kelvin over 3 years ago

    Yerwelcome!
  • Plastic-Demons over 3 years ago

    djcarbines
    I'm personally collecting every UK hit single and album on original format - ever!
    So if anyone is selling CD singles by the hundred, let me know!


    I'd be very disappointed if I wasn't able to help you in some way, I've got a couple of thousand UK CD singles all boxed up and in storage, the bad news is that they've not yet been added to my Discogs collection, so I don't know exactly which ones I've got available off hand.
  • JeffryR over 3 years ago

    I don't believe the demand is likely to rise in the future or the prices. There are a couple of factors that matter in this aspects including the rareness, collectibility aspect and such others. They altogether will determine the prices in the future.
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    djcarbines
    I'm personally collecting every UK hit single and album on original format - ever!

    Well, that sounds exciting. Best of luck.

    Plastic-Demons
    I've got a couple of thousand UK CD singles all boxed up and in storage

    That sounds fun, too. I wonder what you'll end up finding.
  • JT_X over 3 years ago

    IconicMusic
    And to someone who said singles will never hold any value... well.. even some 7" singles today go for a hefty sum.. at least the right ones. CD singles will be no different. Especially for songs that never appeared on an album.

    Before the appearance of the retail CD single, and while 12" singles were still the only way for collectors to buy remixes, there were promo CD singles sent out to radio stations and other industry people. Some of these promo CDs contained remixes otherwise only available on vinyl, and sometimes remixes or edits never released anywhere else. Even obscure pop groups that no one remembers will have promo CDs like this go for $100+ if the condition is right.

    I keep hoping that I'll find a box of Depeche Mode promo CD singles in a store somewhere, at 25¢ each…
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    JT_X
    I keep hoping that I'll find a box of Depeche Mode promo CD singles in a store somewhere, at 25¢ each…

    Cool, good luck - and when you do I'll give you a brand-spanking-new, shiny silver dollar for I Feel Loved - Remix Contest Submissions - Disc 1 Of 2 & I Feel Loved - Remix Contest Submissions - Disc 2 Of 2.
  • catchthebeat76 over 3 years ago

    “What applies to most other music doesn't apply to jazz. It's prestigious and high status. It's esteemed. It's taught, archived, and studied at universities. The people who buy it have disposable incomes and are defacto proud art patrons.“

    👆the exact reason why I hate jazz
  • catchthebeat76 over 3 years ago

    “What applies to most other music doesn't apply to jazz. It's prestigious and high status. It's esteemed. It's taught, archived, and studied at universities. The people who buy it have disposable incomes and are defacto proud art patrons.“

    👆the exact reason why I hate jazz
  • jilemnicky_02 over 3 years ago

    catchthebeat76
    👆the exact reason why I hate jazz


    You are not alone!
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    catchthebeat76
    “What applies to most other music doesn't apply to jazz. It's prestigious and high status. It's esteemed. It's taught, archived, and studied at universities. The people who buy it have disposable incomes and are defacto proud art patrons.“


    Jazz is a music that IMO deserves it's "high status" [a status it has only recently acquired > in Jazz's heyday it was largely looked down upon and considered "black" music]... the "jazz-man" is a noble-man in my opinion > > consider this common musicians' joke: "a rock musician plays 3 chords for 10,000 people & a jazz musician plays 10,000 chords for 3 people" > > is tragically very true. I have personally spent many years studying Indian, Turkish, and Arabic classical music: Ragas, Makams... very sophisticated systems of improvisation, and over time more or less got the hang of those musics..... but in my early 20's I attempted to master bebop jazz and I failed. A big blow to my young ego cuz I figured if I could quite easily learn to play quite like Jimmy Page, then bebop ought to be a 'piece of cake'. NOPE! The thing that makes bebop so difficult is that you can't just 'space-out' and "jam"... your brain needs to be ultra-sharp and on-the-ball all the time because the chords go by so fast and you basically every 4 beats you are playing over a different chord so all the 'right' notes are constantly changing.... it's damn tricky. Maybe it's just that I didn't give it enough time > I grossly underestimated how seriously difficult jazz is to play... And when you consider how unappreciated and even hated jazz music is, you have to admit that the devoted practitioner is likely to be quite a selfless person.

    Jazz music is the one great American improvisational music form which at least rivals the many others in the world such as I have mentioned: Raga, Makam, Tala..... etc etc

    However, sophisticated music is not everyone's cup of tea, and that's fine also....
  • catchthebeat76 over 3 years ago

    You know that moment when you go see a rock show, and the band enters the stage and all tune up there instruments at the same time?
    -that’s a jazz show.
  • IconicMusic over 3 years ago

    IconicMusic edited over 3 years ago
    edwardpowell
    However, sophisticated music is not everyone's cup of tea, and that's fine also....


    I don't think anyone likes or dislikes Jazz music because of its complexity or level of sophistication in technical difficulty. Anyone can appreciate anything for it's technical complexity. Doesn't mean you have to like how it sounds. If it doesn't sound good to your ears then it doesn't sound good.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    IconicMusic
    I don't think anyone likes or dislikes Jazz music because of its complexity or level of sophistication in technical difficulty. Anyone can appreciate anything for it's technical complexity. Doesn't mean you have to like how it sounds. If it doesn't sound good to your ears then it doesn't sound good.


    With Jazz... I didn't understand it and I certainly didn't like it the first time I heard it... but my Dad was so into it, I guess figured it must be good, but I just didn't "get it" > so I kept on trying - for years - to like it, and one day "I got it".

    Something similar happened to me with Indian classical music... I went to India to study sitar so I bought a bunch of sitar cassettes and just couldn't understand or relate to anything in the music. But logically I knew that that music is considered some of the world's greatest music > so it must be good.... so I kept on listening and listening and after about a year or so "I got it". Wow!

    Then the first time I heard Arabic music it blew my socks OFF!

    Going way back, to my very early teens I can remember trying to "graduate" from radio pop music to serious rock music.... I really didn't like it at first > but as a kid I forced myself to sit for hours in front of the stereo because if my older brother and his friends said this was good music, then there must be something in it.

    I am not trying to say that simpler, less sophisticated forms of music are less worthy > truth be known, you'd probably be surprised or even shocked at what music I keep going back to more than anything else. Bottom line is that sophisticated music often takes effort to listen to, appreciate, and grow to love > > > most of us use music for relaxation and don't want to have to think and concentrate (and work). I am exactly the same. I love simple music also. At the end of the day, Blues is probably my most favorite music - but most Blues artists I actually don't like. Only very few....
  • catchthebeat76 over 3 years ago

    Early Rotterdam Gabber music is super complex!
  • AutumnAarilyn over 3 years ago

    PabloPlato
    is there anything that you generally won't find on streaming services? are CD singles and EPs generally available or not?


    I collect classic soul from the 60's through mid 90's and hard bop from the 50's. Less than half were available to stream. Very few single versions or remixes are available on this style on Apple music which is supposed to have the largest number of titles. The pattern I noticed is whatever was in print on cd from 2005 to now is usually available for streaming/downloading. There are many titles reissued on cd that are not available for streaming. The best streaming source is actually free....youtube.
  • RockNurse over 3 years ago

    edwardpowell

    So, no, artists do not love streaming --- streaming is killing the artists' profit, and thereby killing the artists' motivation to create more music. As I said in an earlier post - this situation is having the effect of literally killing the creation of new music. I have been watching this happen with all the many musician friends and colleagues I have all over the world, and noticed it in myself also. It is a massive far-reaching crisis in the making..... after it is all over humanity will look back on the musical era between 1950 and 2000 as one of the great Golden Eras of music, all stimulated by commercialization and profitability (for the ARTISTS) of music.

    So I myself, and artists like me do not anymore release music in any physical formats - rather just as MP3 downloads and/or streaming.
  • RockNurse over 3 years ago

    Hit the message button too fast, sorry. One thing I should point out about my own personal listening habits, is that while, from a collector point of view, I regard streaming roughly along the lines of "if a digital stream falls in the forest and there's no one there to hear it, does it really exist?", and my feeling towards MP3s is "yeah, but you can't clean your weed on an MP3." I want to own the physical artifact - albums have the unique distinction of being a dual artform, because you can engage them with both your tactile/visual senses, and your aural sense; only architecture comes to mind as similarly being dual-purposed (you can engage with it visually as well as on a utilitarian basis).

    So I do hope that artists continue to realize that they are indeed bringing genuine art to the physical world, and it will in theory last well into the future. A stream or MP3, on the other hand, is only as good as the server or hard drive it is stored upon, and neither servers or hard drives are in any way designed for permanence. So if the rest of us non-artists also hold similar values, then it's our duty to put our money where our aesthetics are, and make sure the artists we appreciate are compensated financially for their work - I sure wouldn't expect one of my store employees to clock in for 8 hours for no compensation simply because they like me personally.

    Back to streaming, however: as a CONSUMER I love it, because it's how I tend to preview new music and determine what I in turn plan to go out and purchase. Granted, some artists are no-brainers and I'll buy the new LP without hearing it (ditto some colored vinyl, my weakness). But I typically put in a couple of hours a week previewing bits of new releases on Spotify and making a list of the titles I want to pick up - and without Spotify and its ilk, I can guarantee you that a significant percentage of those titles would NOT get purchased by me.

    So to artists who are (rightfully) dismayed by the shitty royalty structure of streaming, I agree, it sucks. But perhaps your dismay can at least be somewhat mitigated by the fact that streaming definitely increases the chances of your physical released getting purchased, consumers' curiosity also frequently piqued enough to lead to a ticket purchase, and more. By my reckoning, a 1-cent royalty on a spin PLUS a POTENTIAL 10-buck purchase of an LP or CD represents the better, more optimistic, odds.
  • edwardpowell over 3 years ago

    RockNurse
    So to artists who are (rightfully) dismayed by the shitty royalty structure of streaming, I agree, it sucks. But perhaps your dismay can at least be somewhat mitigated by the fact that streaming definitely increases the chances of your physical released getting purchased,


    I'm not sure I agree... I think for most people, if they can stream or download it, then they won't bother to buy it. I admit, as much as I complain about it - I also almost never buy music anymore.... since LPs went 'out' I have not hardly purchased any music >>> perhaps 2 or 3 CDs max... and nothing else as far as I can remember..... so???
    When I make and release new music, I basically just consider it a 'gift/contribution' to the world of music... I never expect even to recoup my expenses. But as one's life changes and one become more responsible for this and that one does not have the luxury of working for free forever.
  • hatfulofelt over 3 years ago

    People will always be bitten by the musician's bug, so to speak - as a music consumer, it's only in my favor to have streaming available. As much as I DO pay for most of what I listen to, it's simply not my concern if artists are able to make a living of their art anymore. I don't lost sleep over it. Being an artist was never a good way to go anyway, even before the Web. Few actually succeed, and it of course depends on the individual what their end game is (career vs. hobby). Enough people will always be willing to work for free as artists, so it's a win-win... for me. My $$ shows my gratitude.
  • capzark about 1 year ago

    If CD values are declining I’d like to know why every damn Japanese CD I want is now priced over $100. I’d also like to know why DCC Gold discs are blowing through the roof. I can usually find a decent vinyl LP of release now for less than a comparable CD. Collectors are clearly hoarding the good stuff and holding out for big money. Older CDs aren’t dead by any means, it’s the loudness war stuff that’s worthless.
  • pulsemod about 1 year ago

    All they're doing is driving traffic to Spotify.
  • PeterHo about 1 year ago

    CD's have not been my main selling item but have been steady for the past couple of years, prices are a bit low though.
  • asd429 about 1 year ago

    There is still a lot of demand for some early pressed Classical CDs (i.e., full silver without IFPI codes).

    One thing which has pushed CD prices right down, especially more common issues, is the proliferation of the mega sellers who buy from the public for pennies and resell for not a lot more. Many's been the time I've given up all hope of selling a CD when I see that one of these sellers has an endless supply of the same title on eBay for something like £1.25 with free post...
  • zero_kelvin about 1 year ago

    I sell around 100 cd's a month, 50% through discogs, steady going on for 6 years.
  • erin.schwandt.es about 1 year ago

    Well damn! Of course I'm a year late and 10 cents short...🤦‍♀️ I don't have a huge collection but these posts put in perspective that $3ish isn't bad for Madonna's "Music" CD....hope Rob Zombie and Melissa Etheridge hit the high end of that scale too 🤞
  • manorsessions about 1 year ago

    I don't sell CD's but I still buy them for albums I really value and I know that they aren't getting a special master for vinyl and aren't likely to be released on SACD.

    I wonder like when vinyl was getting sold of at 50c a piece in bulk at the end of the 80's because CD was more convienient whether there will be a turn around in classic albums, not pop trash but for example Radiohead or Pearl Jam who had some great artwork and packaging.

    I also wonder with the lack of revenue to bands from the likes of Spotify whether subscriptions will need to be come so expensive that buying the album on CD might be better value to someone who doesn't listen to a raft of music.

    I have a Tidal, Deezer and Spotify subscription along with a Roon server with an huge amount of HD audio on it hooked up to a $10k DAC but honestly unless I'm in a real hurry or sitting at the dinning table cueing up the next album I'd rather peruse my disk library and pick out a disk and put it on (and obviously if I'm out and about streaming is great). I often find like with selecting a movie from my disk library that I go in there wanting one thing and as I browse I find something I haven't listed to in ages and change my mind, this rarely happens with streaming. The joy is doubled with vinyl but I still contend that there is something about physical media and its tactility that a lot of people enjoy. I think it is also effected by how much your close friends like music, going over to someones house and playing DJ wars with selecting tracks and albums is so much more fun when you can go through their collection rather that Spotify.

    Another point is I see a trend towards newer artists and those who loath the streaming model only putting out albums, ep's, live recordings on vinyl or CD.

    But I conceed it might be time to donate my copy of Morning Glory to the thrift shop.
  • hatfulofelt about 1 year ago

    manorsessions
    But I conceed it might be time to donate my copy of Morning Glory to the thrift shop.

    Funny, I was watching an Oasis vs. Blur YouTube video earlier today... really brought back some memories. I say: keep it.
  • mclaren7500 12 months ago

    New to selling on discogs but have been selling on Amazon for 6 years. I currently have 2700 listed on Amazon and sales have just gone through the roof due to COVID 19. My 2 week sales figures have gone from £550 after commission to £1464 and then £1692 for my last 2 week period and now on course for £1966 for my current 2 week period. I have never experienced anything like this before. Anyone else experiencing this kind of uptick right now. This is all CD's by the way so sort of related to the thread.
  • djcarbines 12 months ago

    I was experiencing an uptick until I decided to close for disease season. I wouldn't have time to be able to keep up with it.
  • MoaiRecords 11 months ago

    I figure they will be like vinyl: 99.9% will be worthless, the rest will not. Some will sell for big bucks, most will not. I do well with MFSL CDs, but not much else.
  • electronicpaperboy 9 months ago

    I was a late convert to CD. I refused (UK) to buy a CD in the 80's when vinyl was over 50% more costly and inferior in sound. As players became cheaper and technically started to live up to the initial hype, CD's started to drop in price due to EU membership, becoming equal and finally cheap than their big black counterparts. I switched as it was increasingly more difficult to find the music I wanted. Over the past few years I've hoovered up lots of 2nd hand CD's as the 'cool vinyl' craze has stormed on. I know it's only anecdotal, but 2nd hand prices are far higher now than were even 12 months ago, even the big boys have astronomical prices, musicMagpie charging £29.00 for what was maybe a £8.00 disc? I've never really followed the crowd, and yes those late 80's and 90's vinyl albums have been a good investment as I'm sure the 2nd hand CD's I've built up will be.
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    electronicpaperboy
    I know it's only anecdotal, but 2nd hand prices are far higher now than were even 12 months ago, even the big boys have astronomical prices, musicMagpie charging £29.00 for what was maybe a £8.00 disc?

    This has been very evident to me as well, and I wonder why it's occurring.
  • Blackpapercrown 9 months ago

    hatfulofelt
    This has been very evident to me as well, and I wonder why it's occurring.
    I suspect that MusicMagpie looks at Discogs average prices and pitches their price to be just under what they go for here
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    Blackpapercrown
    I suspect that MusicMagpie looks at Discogs average prices and pitches their price to be just under what they go for here

    Thanks. I meant in general actually. I once started a thread about their practices specifically, and they've been very good lately.
  • dolphyfan 9 months ago

    If the buying public is willing to pay X amount, a seller (who is business and has a goal to make a profit) would be foolish not to list his items at market rate. While it's nice to find a seller "who just wants a good home for his music", that ain't the way the world works most of the time. At some point the balance of supply and demand will shift and prices will either go up or down accordingly, or the CDs will sit in inventory until leisure suits come back into fashion.
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    I used to buy a lot more from Amazon's vendors than I now do, as eBay has overtaken them for lower prices a lot of the time.
  • cariocafunk 9 months ago

    hatfulofelt
    electronicpaperboyI know it's only anecdotal, but 2nd hand prices are far higher now than were even 12 months ago, even the big boys have astronomical prices, musicMagpie charging £29.00 for what was maybe a £8.00 disc?
    This has been very evident to me as well, and I wonder why it's occurring.


    I have bought 1000s of CDs off MusicMagpie, what i have found is that untill maybe 12 months ago the max price of £6.99 for any CD, This then went to i think £12.98 and, maybe 5 or 6 months ago this went up again, with some priced at £29.99

    I think partly they have become more clued up, and also they are maybe now prepared to let a CD sit there at £29.99, then let a someone else who has a better idea of it's value list it. Then they use their automatic pricing software to uddercut it. That way they may take longer to sell, but they get a better price. However the grading standard of the CD you receive is still pot luck. Their omni-grading of "Very Good" is a joke, but before people might take a punt on a £6.99 CD which is worth a lot more. Now if you are paying £29.99 you are going to want it "Very Good" condition, rather than the dirty, scratched garbage that they oftern send out.

    I probably buy 25% quantity of what i used at the peak from them now due to price increase. Era of the 1p CD is over on Amazon also. I would be amazed if they don't get their feedback cleansed by Amazon. I've seen it with other big sellers.

    What do you mean by " I once started a thread about their practices specifically, and they've been very good lately. " ?
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    This.
  • cariocafunk 9 months ago

    Interesting thread. You must have really pissed them off on Amazon to get banned. My experience was that the non arrival rate was maybe 10 to 15% until a couple of years ago, and it is much better now (is this what you meant by better practices). The grading is an inaccurate as ever, though it does work both ways and they can undergrade as a lot of people on that thread pointed out.

    The whole "didn't pass our strict quality control" on cancelling orders, i have always taken that as being not in stock in reality, as they will really send out absoloutely anything in any state if necessary it seems to me. Their whole set up involves lying to you from the start (they state everything is "meticullosuly refurbished" or something like that - my spelling is terrible), so guess that would just be another lie to make it sound better for you order cancellation. Grim company, but i've done well out of them.
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    cariocafunk
    You must have really pissed them off on Amazon to get banned.

    All I did was report orders that I never received.

    cariocafunk
    The grading is an inaccurate as ever, though it does work both ways and they can undergrade as a lot of people on that thread pointed out.

    This is the best part for me.

    cariocafunk
    The whole "didn't pass our strict quality control" on cancelling orders, i have always taken that as being not in stock in reality

    I only later realized that: 1) the non-receipt of items was eventually their never shipping them in the first place, yet saying they had via the Amazon system, and 2) if they weren't doing that, they were saying it didn't pass their strict inspections.

    Of course, this is merely speculative.

    cariocafunk
    i've done well out of them

    Me too.
  • CryptidFox 9 months ago

    Like said above a couple times

    I think CDs will be one of those things where rare demos, limited editions, and other desirable/collectible stuff holds value but you're average mass-market release is going to remain basically worth whatever spare change you can get out of it at a yard sale

    Much the same way DVDs and Blu-Rays are
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    I just received 2 CDs from musicMagpie; haven't even opened the package yet. Will do shortly and post the results here for fun.
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    Results: Excellent

    The relatively thin padded white mailer is as beat up looking on the outside, but inside the contents survived - no cracks or broken case components. The Digipak one has light outer wear, but the disc is Like New; the jewel case one is almost New.
  • Jehowlind 9 months ago

    dolphyfan
    At some point the balance of supply and demand will shift and prices will either go up or down accordingly, or the CDs will sit in inventory until leisure suits come back into fashion.


    What??? When did leisure suits go out of style??
  • Weareonenation303 9 months ago

    I haven't bought from Musicmagpie (AKA Estocks.) since I think 2017? The era of cent CDs at Amazon is pretty much dead now and having to pay full shipping for each additional CD makes Amazon a last resort option for CDs, if anything.

    I'd rather use medimops.de for CDs which is basically a German musicmagpie, though many of the current asking prices appear to be generated by a janky software. (IE: CDs priced at 50+ Euros that have never sold for a premium anywhere.) Guess they rather sit on dead stock than sell it.
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    Weareonenation303
    and having to pay full shipping for each additional CD makes Amazon a last resort option for CDs

    Every so often a seller offers free shipping, so I'm always on the lookout for that. More often shipping is more expense than the standard base rate as well, so I'm always looking to avoid that. Sadly, the latter seems much more common than the former.
  • hatfulofelt 9 months ago

    Since YouTube just recommended this video to me, I figured I'd share it here. It's from 1982, showing reporters playing the new format - CD - for a public who hasn't yet heard of them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Tx6TYnPat8
  • djcarbines 9 months ago

    djcarbines edited 9 months ago
    hatfulofelt
    Since YouTube just recommended this video to me, I figured I'd share it here. It's from 1982, showing reporters playing the new format - CD - for a public who hasn't yet heard of them:


    Don't forget the classic wiping jam all over it clip (UK). Paul Weller was not harmed in the production.

    (can't find it on youtube though).
    I did find this 21st century replay of an edited version though. Not the full original but enough to get the idea.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiOFOJWtyGs
  • 2tec 9 months ago

    2tec edited 9 months ago
    Sigh ... people buy music not the media the music is on, my advice, buy and sell good music whatever media it's on ... however, what defines good music isn't easy to define, I just know that corporate, over-produced, crap is not what I, or most people, seem to be interested in! Great music, that is relatively rare, will always sell if reasonably priced, what I don't really understand is analogue collectors who pay insane prices for some vinyl ... it's, well, just craziness ... ;~)

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