• DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    Hello all.

    I’ve been cleaning my records this way for two years and, putting disputes about the actual cleaning routine aside, wondered what you guys think.

    1. I clamp my record to the platter and turn it to 45 RPM.
    2. I brush off surface dirt and debris with an anti static brush.
    3. I spray a little cleaning solution on the record (20:80, IPA:dH2O) and use a felt pad to clean the record on a superficial level.
    4. I spray a little mote solution on and use a TONAR WETGOAT brush to get deep down into the grooves and dig all the dirt out.
    5. I dry on a superficial level with a lint-free microfibre cloth and then placed the record on a drying rack. I do this to both sides, shoot it a few times with the MILTY ZERO-STAT and then place the record into a HDPE anti-static inner sleeve.

    Do any of you guys also clean your records on the platter? I should note that the motor is separate to my platter and never once have I had an accident with fluid or instruments around my turntable.

    Let me know your thoughts!
  • david.mckain about 1 year ago

    I don't clean records on the turntable except for quick dry wipe with microfiber cloth.

    I've been experimenting with US cleaning and, for most instances, it works pretty well.

    I posted a crude video (Video/Audio) with before/after where the "before" recording was done after I had cleaned the vinyl with a microfiber cloth and solution. The "after" was post 20 minute ultrasonic cleaning/air drying.

    It won't fix defects/scratches but it definitely reduced background noise (removed crud from groove).

    The ongoing quest for "clean" records.
  • luceroj about 1 year ago

    All that cloth is doing is moving the grime around. Buy or use a cheap TT (stripped down) or wooden lazy susan (drill a center hole and glue a dowel). Spray, use paint edger to get into the grooves, and vacuum off with a vinyl vac.
  • Arekive about 1 year ago

    What he (luceroj) said. Keep elaborate cleaning routines away from the deck you listen/play with. I assume that's what you do but it didn't specifically say in the post. Another user here linked to a youtube of someone's over the top (in my opinion) cleaning ritual and then they played the record on THAT turntable. It looked like the dude had some cash into his system so why you would put your turntable through that is beyond me. My 2 cents.
  • andrenafulva about 1 year ago

    I would certainly be wary with cleaning a record spinning as fast as 45rpm. I bought a Knosti manual cleaning machine (which has goats-hair brushes) a few years ago, and some of the first records I cleaned showed rubbing marks afterwards. I realised that I was spinning the discs too fast – and that would have been far slower than 45rpm.

    If I was going to use my turntable to clean records, I think I'd unhook the belt and move the platter by hand rather than using the motor to spin it. That way you can be a lot more gentle. It's also useful to turn the record in both directions while cleaning it, as that can help get more dirt out. You might be able to do this manually, depending on how your platter is connected to the chassis.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    andrenafulva
    I would certainly be wary with cleaning a record spinning as fast as 45rpm. I bought a Knosti manual cleaning machine (which has goats-hair brushes) a few years ago, and some of the first records I cleaned showed rubbing marks afterwards. I realised that I was spinning the discs too fast – and that would have been far slower than 45rpm.

    If I was going to use my turntable to clean records, I think I'd unhook the belt and move the platter by hand rather than using the motor to spin it. That way you can be a lot more gentle. It's also useful to turn the record in both directions while cleaning it, as that can help get more dirt out. You might be able to do this manually, depending on how your platter is connected to the chassis.


    The RPM 1.3 is an ‘inverted’ platter. The bearing housing is in the platter and it sits on the pin. I’ll take the belt off this time and try doing it by hand.
  • david.mckain about 1 year ago

    Arekive
    Another user here linked to a youtube of someone's over the top (in my opinion) cleaning ritual and then they played the record on THAT turntable. It looked like the dude had some cash into his system so why you would put your turntable through that is beyond me. My 2 cents.


    The someone was me. My cleaning methodology is not even close to over the top - look around and you will find people using laboratory grade deionized water with very expensive vacuum cleaning machines. My objective has been get the best results for the least money. The point of the video was to objectively (with evidence) show that my cleaning worked. Additionally, it showed how rubbing with a microfiber cloth and cleaning solution did not work. I don't buy subjective "It sounds better" supporting arguments for other methods.

    For someone who is just maintaining their own collection it might be fine to have a more simple approach. At least you know how your records have been treated. However, if you frequently get records from thrift shops that are, typically, very dirty, it makes sense to have a more "over the top" cleaning routine. While the best sound from the record is one objective another is to protect your stylus from damage/increased wear resulting from crap/crud/junk sitting in the record groove. Additionally, proper cleaning can remove mold/mildew that, over time, will damage vinyl.

    At the least I think that a spin-clean type unit, with brushes and a tank for cleaning fluid, is a worthwhile investment at about ~$60.

    If I didn't have any other option I would not get liquid near my turntable. I don't think it would hurt the direct drive motor itself but there are other electronics/mechanisms down under the platter that would not mix well with any fluid.
  • david.mckain about 1 year ago

    For reference:

    Spin-Clean - around $80. Generic versions run around $60.

    Nitty Gritty Record Master 1 - $565 U.S.
    VPI HW 16.5 - $800 U.S.
    Audio Desk Vinyl Cleaner Pro - $4,500 U.S.

    6-liter ultrasonic cleaner - about $180 U.S.

    I did a DIY mechanism to hold the record(s) and slowly rotate them in the ultrasonic bath but not everyone wants to go down that path.

    There's a company selling the mechanism that attaches to an ultrasonic tank for that purpose - currently about $130 U.S. on amazon.

    And for kicks - Orthofon 2M black replacement stylus (shibata) - Currently $576 U.S. on amazon.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    david.mckain
    For reference:

    Spin-Clean - around $80. Generic versions run around $60.

    Nitty Gritty Record Master 1 - $565 U.S.
    VPI HW 16.5 - $800 U.S.
    Audio Desk Vinyl Cleaner Pro - $4,500 U.S.

    6-liter ultrasonic cleaner - about $180 U.S.

    I did a DIY mechanism to hold the record(s) and slowly rotate them in the ultrasonic bath but not everyone wants to go down that path.

    There's a company selling the mechanism that attaches to an ultrasonic tank for that purpose - currently about $130 U.S. on amazon.

    And for kicks - Orthofon 2M black replacement stylus (shibata) - Currently $576 U.S. on amazon.


    Yes, there are certainly innumerable ways to achieve professional results at a fraction of the cost. Off topic but out of interest, what is the relevance behind your poly(chloroethene) profile picture? Just find it interesting, haha!

    Duncan.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    If I didn't have any other option I would not get liquid near my turntable. I don't think it would hurt the direct drive motor itself but there are other electronics/mechanisms down under the platter that would not mix well with any fluid.[/quote]

    I have a Project RPM 1.3 Genie turntable. The platter is just a solid block of refined MDF, so no fluid can get into any mechanism. In addition to this, the actual motor sits about eight or nine inches away from the spindle. The platter contains the bearing housing and it sits on the pin below.
  • david.mckain about 1 year ago

    DuncanWilson


    Yes, there are certainly innumerable ways to achieve professional results at a fraction of the cost. Off topic but out of interest, what is the relevance behind your poly(chloroethene) profile picture? Just find it interesting, haha!

    Duncan.


    Couldn't thiink of anything more exciting - chemistry can be fun!

    I'd think it's commonly polyvinyl chloride but I'm just a mechanical engineer.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    I'd think it's commonly polyvinyl chloride but I'm just a mechanical engineer.[/quote]

    You’re quite right! That’s the commonly accepted name. Been making some polymers in the lab recently and picked up a bad habit of non-standardised name calling!

    A world without mechanical engineers is like a world without records! All the best.
  • berothbr about 1 year ago

    david.mckain
    I don't buy subjective "It sounds better" supporting arguments for other methods.
    Anyone who’s ever used a record cleaning machine will surely attest to the contrary as this is demonstrably false. Using your turntable to clean records is a terrible idea. If you don’t have access to a cleaning system, just put the record on a clean non-marring surface and use whatever combination of compressed air and wet cleaning methods you’re most comfortable with.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    Using your turntable to clean records is a terrible idea. If you don’t have access to a cleaning system, just put the record on a clean non-marring surface and use whatever combination of compressed air and wet cleaning methods you’re most comfortable with.[/quote]

    I’ve been cleaning my records on my turntable platter for two years. Turn it by hand. As previously said, my turntable platter has no electronics and nowhere for the fluid to run. The motor is separate to the platter. I remove the belt and just spin it by hand. I, of course, have a different platter mat for cleaning on. I change the mat back to my leather one after. A record cleaning machine would be great, but money doesn’t allow right now. Don’t see the point in buying a Lady-Suzan or a cheap turntable as I can just spin my turntable platter by hand and achieve the same end goal. Love how salty people on here get. Lol.
  • randomdestructn about 1 year ago

    DuncanWilson
    Love how salty people on here get.


    You asked for opinions on your methods.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    randomdestructn
    DuncanWilsonLove how salty people on here get.

    You asked for opinions on your methods.


    Indeed I did! And I love how salty people get on here! :)
  • berothbr about 1 year ago

    DuncanWilson
    I remove the belt and just spin it by hand.
    what does the spinning accomplish?
    DuncanWilson
    Love how salty people on here get.
    You asked for opinions about whether it’s a good idea to partially disassemble your turntable and use it as a manual spinning apparatus for cleaning dirty records.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    berothbr
    DuncanWilsonI remove the belt and just spin it by hand.what does the spinning accomplish?

    DuncanWilsonLove how salty people on here get.You asked for opinions about whether it’s a good idea to partially disassemble your turntable and use it as a manual spinning apparatus for cleaning dirty records.


    I lower the goat hair brush into the grooves with IPA/dH2O solution. I spin both ways a few times to dislodge what I can. More likely to dislodge dirt and debris by spinning it than not. You’ll notice that RCMs tend to spin. Would be characteristically futile for them to remain stagnant throughout the cleaning process.

    My post made no reference to ‘partially dissembling’ any turntable. My post was to inquire if others on here also clean records on their platter.
  • Arekive about 1 year ago

    Arekive edited about 1 year ago
    @david.mckain-I did not realize your response had a link to a video in it. No, this was in the forums but under a different topic and judging from your profile/interests ( and chemical engineering street cred) you are probably not the guy scrubbing brown sugar into his record grooves with a manicure brush!!
    (Some of) The only chemistry I know... Dust+Liquid=Mud
  • berothbr about 1 year ago

    DuncanWilson
    My post made no reference to ‘partially dissembling’ any turntable
    What else do you call removing the belt?
    DuncanWilson
    You’ll notice that RCMs tend to spin
    On a record cleaning machine, the platter has to spin because the vacuum tube is in a fixed position and would not otherwise come into contact with the full playing surface. Unlike a vacuum tube, you can move your hand around the entire disc without having to spin it.

    If you don’t want to shell out for a machine, you should check out those record rollers, which are usually less than $20 and can be found on Amazon. If you’re unaware, these are basically like a lint brush roller for records and are really good at eliminating ‘debris’ especially as a first pass (I actually use one first before putting records on my VPI). Nothing compares to a machine, but I’ve definitely found these rollers to be much better than a brush.
  • DuncanWilson about 1 year ago

    berothbr
    DuncanWilsonMy post made no reference to ‘partially dissembling’ any turntableWhat else do you call removing the belt?
    DuncanWilsonYou’ll notice that RCMs tend to spinOn a record cleaning machine, the platter has to spin because the vacuum tube is in a fixed position and would not otherwise come into contact with the full playing surface. Unlike a vacuum tube, you can move your hand around the entire disc without having to spin it.

    If you don’t want to shell out for a machine, you should check out those record rollers, which are usually less than $20 and can be found on Amazon. If you’re unaware, these are basically like a lint brush roller for records and are really good at eliminating ‘debris’ especially as a first pass (I actually use one first before putting records on my VPI). Nothing compares to a machine, but I’ve definitely found these rollers to be much better than a brush.


    I get you! I’ll certainly give that roller idea a go and see how I get on. Got a record recently described in NM condition that has two or three skips (haha) so I’ll test it on that and see if it’s just debris.

    I’ll be getting an RCM at some point as I’m buying quite a lot of vinyl at the moment. Would save so much tome and result in deeper and more substantial cleaning. Always upgrades to be made!
  • luceroj about 1 year ago

    david.mckain
    For reference:

    Spin-Clean - around $80. Generic versions run around $60.

    Nitty Gritty Record Master 1 - $565 U.S.
    VPI HW 16.5 - $800 U.S.
    Audio Desk Vinyl Cleaner Pro - $4,500 U.S.

    6-liter ultrasonic cleaner - about $180 U.S.

    I did a DIY mechanism to hold the record(s) and slowly rotate them in the ultrasonic bath but not everyone wants to go down that path.

    There's a company selling the mechanism that attaches to an ultrasonic tank for that purpose - currently about $130 U.S. on amazon.

    And for kicks - Orthofon 2M black replacement stylus (shibata) - Currently $576 U.S. on amazon.


    Vinyl Vac with all my store bought accessories = $40 (if you own a wet/dry vac) $60 (if you don't). Equivalent to any vacuum system listed, but cheaper, quieter, and faster.
  • jasalton about 1 year ago

    All these methods are for records that are relatively clean to begin with, correct? Like, you are just removing a tiny amount of dust/oils/grime/ect from them?

    What would you guys recommend (other than a trash can) for records with substantial visible dirt/mold? I just came into a big stack of old 45s that look like hell. But, I would at least like to listen to them before they get trashed or donated. These are so bad, I wouldn’t even put them on my backup turntable without a good cleaning first.

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