• 62per over 3 years ago

    62per edité over 3 years ago
    @ mjb - thank you for the tip where sound settings now is adjusted.

    After what I until now understand the best results when sampling and processing audio is achieved by using the lowest common nominator of the chain. In our example the analog to digital converter in the turntable will as an upper limit digitize the weak fluctuating current coming from the cartridge 16 x 48000 times per second, a number of bits easily handled by USB port, notebook and system-on-a-chip in the android box (the soundcard appear not to be a member of the chain as recording works also with the soundcard disabled). In the flat screen TV the digital signal is converted back to a weak fluctuating current and transferred to the TV´s headphone jack.

    The lowest common nominator could easily be the digital to analog converter in the TV where it is reasonable to believe it will handle at least 16 bits 44100 times per second as this is a standard widely used among manufacturers of electronics.

    So - after lessons learned: setting Audacity to sample in 16 bit 44.1KHz and save in FLAC 16bit file format could be reasonable when it comes to these USB turntables.

    Off topic but interesting - perhaps the Cassini space probe just now diving into the clouds of Saturn works in similar ways - digitizing data from various analog sensors, compressing data and bleeping them back to earth where they are uncompressed and perhaps even converted back to analog signals. What a world!
  • Telcoman over 3 years ago

    Telcoman edité over 3 years ago
    First of all I would like to thank everybody in this thread. I have learned a lot from it!

    Being in (more or less) the same boat as the TS, I have narrowed down my options and would very much appreciate your comments and thoughts!

    My set up:
    1) SL 1210 MK2 with Ortofon Pro element and needle (10 resp. 1 year old).
    2) Pioneer DDJ SX2 controller.

    I have very extensive vinyl collection that I partially ripped in WAV's with the DDJ SX2. However, I am not satisfied with the sound quality. This may be caused by the Pioneers soundcard or the SL 1210, not sure.

    To improve on my ripping, I see two options that in theory should be adequate:
    1) A Sony PS HX500 in conjunction with Vinylstudio. Pricetag will be around 420 EUR
    2) An ART USB Phono Plus PS (USB pre-amp), also with Vinylstudio. Total price around 130.

    Now on paper, this would be an easy decision as the pre amp is a quarter of the price compared to the Sony. The downsides are numerous however: extra dependencies (10 year old SL 1210, Ortofon DJ element, etc) Also, the Sony could be used independently of the SL1210's and nicely put on my buro.

    All in all, I am tempted to buy the Sony PS Hx500. I have to add it gets rave reviews.

    EDIT: a 3) Option would be to buy a new turntable (like a Pro-ject Essential II) and to use this with the ART USB Phono. I see this as second best, as it compares to the pricetag of the Sony while introducing a new link in the recording chain.
  • SEJU over 3 years ago

    Telcoman
    My set up:
    1) SL 1210 MK2 with Ortofon Pro element and needle (10 resp. 1 year old).
    2) Pioneer DDJ SX2 controller.

    I have very extensive vinyl collection that I partially ripped in WAV's with the DDJ SX2. However, I am not satisfied with the sound quality. This may be caused by the Pioneers soundcard or the SL 1210, not sure.


    The SL 1210 MK2 should be ok. Although it would depends from how you treated it. If for example the arm got some impacts (changing vinyl too fast without light and with only view moments to play on the other deck if that sounds familiar ...) it should be tested and realigned. Ortofon Pro could be improved with a better cartridge. I never used the DDJ SX2, so I do not know how it fairs. Generally everyone advices to not use a mixer and go straight: cartridge > preamp > A/D converter.

    Telcoman
    To improve on my ripping, I see two options that in theory should be adequate:
    1) A Sony PS HX500 in conjunction with Vinylstudio. Pricetag will be around 420 EUR
    2) An ART USB Phono Plus PS (USB pre-amp), also with Vinylstudio. Total price around 130.

    Now on paper, this would be an easy decision as the pre amp is a quarter of the price compared to the Sony. The downsides are numerous however: extra dependencies (10 year old SL 1210, Ortofon DJ element, etc) Also, the Sony could be used independently of the SL1210's and nicely put on my buro.

    All in all, I am tempted to buy the Sony PS Hx500. I have to add it gets rave reviews.

    EDIT: a 3) Option would be to buy a new turntable (like a Pro-ject Essential II) and to use this with the ART USB Phono. I see this as second best, as it compares to the pricetag of the Sony while introducing a new link in the recording chain.


    I have to add that I always wanted to try the Sony. I would probably go this way, since you would not need anything else. In the Sony the preamp and A/D is already included. It samples also at up to 192 kHz ... not that you would need that necessarily.

    I also had always good experiences with Sony equipment.

    If you went this way, were you so kind of reporting back about your experience?
  • mjb over 3 years ago

    Telcoman
    I am not satisfied with the sound quality.

    So many things could affect the sound quality. Maybe it's the components you are thinking of replacing, maybe not ... maybe post on Zippyshare a WAV of a short audio clip that demonstrates the problems? Then we can maybe narrow down the cause.
  • DetroitBootyBass over 3 years ago

    DetroitBootyBass edité over 3 years ago
    The Pioneer DDJ SX2 has poor sound quality - it's a common complaint about that controller. A Rane mixer (as well as Allen & Heath, Ecler, and Rodec) will have good phono stages built into the unit for archival purposes. The Technics 1200 would not be a problem audio-wise (provided it isn't broken).

    My opinion is to take the Pioneer controller out of the audio chain and get the ART Phono Plus PS. That should solve most of your audio problems and they are pretty cheap to buy at Amazon (about 70 USD).

    If you then want to upgrade further, you could get a better stylus for your Orotofon cartridge - an OM20 (which is a nude-mounted elliptical) or an OM30 (a nude-mounted fine-line stylus).
  • Telcoman over 3 years ago

    DetroitBootyBass
    The Pioneer DDJ SX2 has poor sound quality - it's a common complaint about that controller. A Rane mixer (as well as Allen & Heath, Ecler, and Rodec) will have good phono stages built into the unit for archival purposes. The Technics 1200 would not be a problem audio-wise (provided it isn't broken).

    My opinion is to take the Pioneer controller out of the audio chain and get the ART Phono Plus PS. That should solve most of your audio problems and they are pretty cheap to buy at Amazon (about 70 USD).


    Solid advice, Thanks. Switching to a new mixer is not an option unfortunately.
    I just saw pro-ject has recently released a usb turntable also.
  • konkordski over 3 years ago

    Telcoman
    To improve on my ripping, I see two options that in theory should be adequate:
    1) A Sony PS HX500 in conjunction with Vinylstudio. Pricetag will be around 420 EUR
    2) An ART USB Phono Plus PS (USB pre-amp), also with Vinylstudio. Total price around 130.


    Waste of money. Your Technics is much better. You should only check if the tonearm is good, also the wiring (both tonearm and interconnect) which you may want to change. I assume the Ortofon is a black Concorde? Just buy this stylus for it https://www.ortofon.com/stylus-30-p-373-n-3384
    Then get a preamp with usb connection or preamp and an interface depending on budget. The Art Usb seems to be decent enough, but the Ortofon deserves a better one.
  • Telcoman over 3 years ago

    konkordski
    Waste of money. Your Technics is much better. You should only check if the tonearm is good, also the wiring (both tonearm and interconnect) which you may want to change


    Good advice, thx!!

    I have been able to do side to side comparisons of the SL 1200 and the TEAC TN-300 (via USB) and the SL 1200 far exceeds the TN-300 in terms of sound quality. Have yet to do a rip using the RCA analog outputs of the TEAC.
  • Telcoman over 3 years ago

    On a side note, when I compare the waveform of a vinylrip to a digital FLAC file (exact same tracks, synced in Rekordbox) the vinylrip is much less detailed. Also the sound level is lower on the vinylrip. When I am recording in Vinylstudio however, raising the input level generates clips....

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  • kurts.ear.candy over 3 years ago

    kurts.ear.candy edité over 3 years ago
    After much hand wringing over what to replace my original ART unit which died after ten years I decided to get this https://www.amazon.com/Pro-Ject-Phono-Box-USB-Black/dp/B00FQLMBL4 . After several months of heavy use, I love it. The key is to remove as much processing as possible by getting the signal digital immediately with a quality USB unit and bypass any and all soundcards, mixers, anything. Straight from TT to preamp to computer. It takes some time to figure out where to set the variable gain and you must adjust for each individual LP to avoid clipping and compensate for hot and quiet pressings. If you're after quality rips, there is no one size fits all setting. I rip each side 3 times with the first one to figure out where to set the gain and see what kind of anomalies show up with the third being the keeper master for clean up and what not. Why three times ? I saw it suggested a long time ago. I used to do two, but upon doing three I saw that some clicks that showed up on the second rip were gone on the third. Stuff gets loosened on the first play, moves around and can show up on the second and on the third be gone after a good brushing before the third. I have seen this happen too many times to do any less than three now.
  • ijustspeak over 3 years ago

    ijustspeak edité over 3 years ago
    Key thing when it comes to ripping:
    1: Good turntable with as little static noise as possible. 1210 is alright despite internal PSU (which for me is this turntables biggest weakness). Always do a listen before use. put needle on inner grooves and listen for hums and hiss. Software like Audition has tools for pops, clicks, static noise qnd hum removal. Just remember, the use of these features degrades the final quality of file. Avoid use of these as much as you can. Only thing i used is click removal if a lot is present.
    2. Good balanced cartridge.Tonearm can be as class AAA as it wants, but without a good cartridge, still going suck like stock tonearm. Btw, 1210 tonearm is totally OK for ripping as long as bearings are ok and such. Make sure you have GOOD QUALITY noise shielded audio cables soldered on. Dont use stock cables.. they suck. (same goes for ground wire, internal grounded TT is also fine in my experience)
    3. Make the signal as direct from source to recording software as possible. Avoid use of mixer in between. The only thing that was between my TT and Recording source was an audio card and a simple preamp box.

    Does not have to be expensive gear. An ok audio card suits most. The key thing is Cartridge is what you should put money in.
    I had a $120 cartridge and a $130-ish dollar USB Interface Audio card and a very self-customised 1210 that i God knows how much money i spent in it in transistors and capacitors and other bits.
  • Adam-XT over 3 years ago

    Adam-XT edité over 3 years ago
    Hi, I have just started vinyl ripping and from what people are saying it seems best to rip 16bit 44.1khz. I have an Sony PS-HX500 where you can record through USB. But when I record its about -6db and even when I amplify so its 0 either in Audacity or Sony's application which allows up to 6db gain its still fairly quiet compared to digital releases. So would buying one of these ART Amp devices help with increasing the output as it seems I would have to increase the gain quite a lot in Audactiy otherwise.
  • 3y3_HERt_Wax over 3 years ago

    Adam-XT
    But when I record its about -6db


    You'll find this with most mixers and audio devices, sticking to RIAA standards. Best thing imho is to just boost the entire recording by 1.25 db and again by 1.75. Adjust these numbers to suit, leaving at least 1.5db headroom, keeping it in the amber. Works for me and any artifacts are removed by hand, never using auto-fix.

    Sometimes you may need to apply a low cut filter or high pass to really bring out the dynamics. This little device takes care of all that, adding the ability to overdrive the signal to your recording software.

    http://artproaudio.com/turntable_preamps/product/usb_phono_plus-ps/
  • Adam-XT over 3 years ago

    3y3_HERt_Wax


    You'll find this with most mixers and audio devices, sticking to RIAA standards. Best thing imho is to just boost the entire recording by 1.25 db and again by 1.75. Adjust these numbers to suit, leaving at least 1.5db headroom, keeping it in the amber. Works for me and any artifacts are removed by hand, never using auto-fix.

    Sometimes you may need to apply a low cut filter or high pass to really bring out the dynamics. This little device takes care of all that, adding the ability to overdrive the signal to your recording software.

    http://artproaudio.com/turntable_preamps/product/usb_phono_plus-ps/


    Hi, thank you for the response. Do you mean boost in Audacity by 1.25db after recording? because as I say increasing it by 6db with the gain setting or amplify still isn't as loud as digital tracks. As there is a gain setting in Audacity to the left of the track there is a slider that allows you to increase the volume, but if I increase it a lot say around 12-15db would that affect the quality? So I was wondering buying one of those preamps would increase the volume to a similar level as digital tracks so I could record it louder without having to use gain or amplify.

    I'm also having a issue with my turntable as it plays tracks slightly faster than it should. I didn't realise until I saw the actual length on soundcloud as the difference is about 8 seconds for a track that is supposed to be 5min 54 seconds. This is the first turntable I have had so I have no idea if this is normal although I suspect not.
  • stetsonic over 3 years ago

    Adam-XT


    Hi, thank you for the response. Do you mean boost in Audacity by 1.25db after recording? because as I say increasing it by 6db with the gain setting or amplify still isn't as loud as digital tracks. As there is a gain setting in Audacity to the left of the track there is a slider that allows you to increase the volume, but if I increase it a lot say around 12-15db would that affect the quality? So I was wondering buying one of those preamps would increase the volume to a similar level as digital tracks so I could record it louder without having to use gain or amplify.

    I'm also having a issue with my turntable as it plays tracks slightly faster than it should. I didn't realise until I saw the actual length on soundcloud as the difference is about 8 seconds for a track that is supposed to be 5min 54 seconds. This is the first turntable I have had so I have no idea if this is normal although I suspect not.


    About the recording being quiet at 0dB - if you haven't done any declicking on the recording, the loudest parts will most definitely be clicks and pops. Especially in the beginning of each side, as the needle drops into the groove it usually produces a popping sound that can be close to 0dB already. When you amplify the track, that pop will be the 0.00 point and if it's, say, 5 dB's louder than the actual music, your track will still be at -5 dB.

    It's not unusual for a belt drive turntable to be badly off-speed. And it's not only the cheapos that do it, either. Most decent TT's have some kind of speed adjustment similar to tape decks but the adjustment is not a very fun task without a strobe light/disk etc. All I can say is a direct drive Technics SL-1200mk2 was the best TT purchase I ever made. Bought a used one in pristine condition some five years ago and I haven't looked back since. I still got my old Rega in the basement as a backup but I truly hope I'll never have to resort to using it again. Not likely though, as the Technics is rather well built. And the speed is exactly what it's supposed to be.
  • kurts.ear.candy over 3 years ago

    Adam-XT

    http://artproaudio.com/turntable_preamps/product/usb_phono_plus-ps/

    Hi, thank you for the response. Do you mean boost in Audacity by 1.25db after recording? because as I say increasing it by 6db with the gain setting or amplify still isn't as loud as digital tracks. As there is a gain setting in Audacity to the left of the track there is a slider that allows you to increase the volume, but if I increase it a lot say around 12-15db would that affect the quality? So I was wondering buying one of those preamps would increase the volume to a similar level as digital tracks so I could record it louder without having to use gain or amplify.

    I'm also having a issue with my turntable as it plays tracks slightly faster than it should. I didn't realise until I saw the actual length on soundcloud as the difference is about 8 seconds for a track that is supposed to be 5min 54 seconds. This is the first turntable I have had so I have no idea if this is normal although I suspect not.


    Deal with all clicks and pops to the rip before changing / boosting the gain to the entire file. Boosting the gain to the file should not affect the quality. You are just adjusting the file. Distortion gets introduced when you play the file through whatever means you use or when you convert the file to another format, say wav to mp3. 16 / 41 should be fine for ripping, although I use 16 / 48. Going to 48 does make a difference overall, although you may not hear it. Anything above that is overkill, imo. 24 bit is unnecessary.

    The ART is a fair preamp. I used one for years until it just plain wore out after 10 years. The switch buttons stopped working and caused channel dropouts. I got the new one and after trying 3 different ones, gave up on it. The biggest problem was at least a 1dB difference between channels. 1.5 dB was what two of them did. That is unacceptable. I established this using test records and playing back the rips. I used No Artist - Cardas Frequency Sweep And Burn-In Record and No Artist - An Audio Obstacle Course - Shure Trackability Test Record to establish this. The No Artist - Cardas Frequency Sweep And Burn-In Record is something that anyone doing ripping should have. It also has a strobe pattern on the label that will react to fluorescent lights at both 50 and 60 hzs to determine if your turntable speed is correct.

    After much studying I went with https://www.amazon.com/Pro-Ject-Phono-Box-USB-Black/dp/B00FQLMBL4 . Couldn't be happier after 6 months of heavy ripping. Balance between channels is nearly perfect among other things. That and the variable gain which is a must. There is no one setting for all records. Some records, especially all the new represses are much quieter as well as older vinyl like the MFSL's from the 80's.

    And another vote for the venerable Technics SL1200. They set the industry standard for speed / pitch control. So you find that your belt drive TT is off speed and you have no pitch control. Now what ? You're screwed. I don't know why the HiFi crowd hates the SL1200. A nice used one for $600 is going to outperform anything new that is available for the same price today.
  • Adam-XT over 3 years ago

    kurts.ear.candy
    Deal with all clicks and pops to the rip before changing / boosting the gain to the entire file. Boosting the gain to the file should not affect the quality. You are just adjusting the file. Distortion gets introduced when you play the file through whatever means you use or when you convert the file to another format, say wav to mp3. 16 / 41 should be fine for ripping, although I use 16 / 48. Going to 48 does make a difference overall, although you may not hear it. Anything above that is overkill, imo. 24 bit is unnecessary.

    The ART is a fair preamp. I used one for years until it just plain wore out after 10 years. The switch buttons stopped working and caused channel dropouts. I got the new one and after trying 3 different ones, gave up on it. The biggest problem was at least a 1dB difference between channels. 1.5 dB was what two of them did. That is unacceptable. I established this using test records and playing back the rips. I used No Artist - Cardas - Frequency Sweep And Burn-In Record and No Artist - An Audio Obstacle Course - Shure Trackability Test Record to establish this. The No Artist - Cardas - Frequency Sweep And Burn-In Record is something that anyone doing ripping should have. It also has a strobe pattern on the label that will react to fluorescent lights at both 50 and 60 hzs to determine if your turntable speed is correct.

    After much studying I went with https://www.amazon.com/Pro-Ject-Phono-Box-USB-Black/dp/B00FQLMBL4 . Couldn't be happier after 6 months of heavy ripping. Balance between channels is nearly perfect among other things. That and the variable gain which is a must. There is no one setting for all records. Some records, especially all the new represses are much quieter as well as older vinyl like the MFSL's from the 80's.

    And another vote for the venerable Technics SL1200. They set the industry standard for speed / pitch control. So you find that your belt drive TT is off speed and you have no pitch control. Now what ? You're screwed. I don't know why the HiFi crowd hates the SL1200. A nice used one for $600 is going to outperform anything new that is available for the same price today.


    Thank you very much for your reply defiantly makes things clearer. Just to clarify is it necessary to buy a preamp and is it more for sound than amplifying? The Technics is a direct drive so is that what makes it more accurate than drive belt turn tables? Is there a turntable I can buy new that you would recommend, as I'm not keen on the idea of buying a used one as there would no warranty etc. Probably would go higher than the £250 I paid for the Sony PS-HX500 if there is one in particular that is much better.
  • kurts.ear.candy over 3 years ago

    Adam-XT

    Thank you very much for your reply defiantly makes things clearer. Just to clarify is it necessary to buy a preamp and is it more for sound than amplifying? The Technics is a direct drive so is that what makes it more accurate than drive belt turn tables? Is there a turntable I can buy new that you would recommend, as I'm not keen on the idea of buying a used one as there would no warranty etc. Probably would go higher than the £250 I paid for the Sony PS-HX500 if there is one in particular that is much better.


    Yes a preamp is for the sound quality from the turntable only. Has nothing to do with amplification in the sense of speakers or that part of the food chain. The reason for a quality preamp with USB out is that it avoids soundcards altogether and does the digital conversion at the earliest possible point. Soundcards are where distortion and wonkiness enters the picture.

    I don't know what to say about worrying about buying a used SL1200 other than its the best thing I ever did. I bought a 1989 SL1200 MK3 from Japan nearly two years ago. I just use it for ripping. My original TT was an SL1700 bought new from the 1970's and it still works. The 1200 was just an overdue upgrade. They pretty much work or they don't, there is no in between. They are very easily serviced here in the states should they ever need it. Can't say about over in the UK, but I suspect that would be the case as well. Just try and find one that wasn't used for DJing. It might take some digging but the reward will be worth it. Odds are if the original box and what not are still with it, it was taken care of properly.
  • mvns over 3 years ago

    Adam-XT

    Thank you very much for your reply defiantly makes things clearer. Just to clarify is it necessary to buy a preamp and is it more for sound than amplifying? The Technics is a direct drive so is that what makes it more accurate than drive belt turn tables? Is there a turntable I can buy new that you would recommend, as I'm not keen on the idea of buying a used one as there would no warranty etc. Probably would go higher than the £250 I paid for the Sony PS-HX500 if there is one in particular that is much better.


    I'd echo kurts.ear.candy and get a used SL1200. Best decision ever, no fussing about inaccurate speeds or speed fluctuations due to a tired belt or even as small as wrong thickness of the belt. This affected my Rega P3, all the way to a high-end VPI turntable. All of them beaten hands down by the SL1200 in terms of stability and reliability. I sold them all off and kept the SL1200. Service centers and parts are plentiful as many DJs and clubs still use it as their workhorse.

    One thing to note about preamps - make sure the gain of the preamp is matched to the voltage output of the cartridge. You don't want to overload or underload the preamp as it makes for terrible sound quality. You can calculate them here: https://www.kabusa.com/pregain.htm
  • off____centre over 3 years ago

    off____centre edité over 3 years ago
    Do not agree. Sound of a good belt drive (like Thorens 124, 125 160 s etc) beats the sound of direct drive (technics e.a.) Technics is best for mixing of course, i know, but when it comes to recording why not go for the best sound. Compare and be convinced. This is true for electronic music as well. The speed of good Thorens (or Linn sonndek etc) is 100% reliable and never fluctuates. But please do what you think is best. I don't give a fluc.
  • Crimson69666 over 2 years ago

    Crimson69666 edité over 2 years ago
    Ha ha ha, SL1200, "kurts.ear.candy" and "mvns" like the sweet background BUZZZzzzz of the direct drive motor!!! He goes as far as to thumbs down a "high end VPI", hilarious!!! If your VPI / Rega has inaccurate speed, just get it fixed, that's really not normal. Once fixed, it'll just destroy the SL1200 qualitywise. I loved the SL1200 while i was a DJ, it was the best high torque turntable for mixing, soundwise it's not remotely audiophile.

    I've recorded vinyls for the last 30 years. I'm a audiophile and was a DJ between 1985-2005. Get the best sounding turntable / RIAA preamp / Sound card you can afford. High End belt-drive turntables are unbeatable. Extract the more music info you can from your vinyls. Getting high quality rips cost a bit of money. Depend of how much quality / fidelity you want. Easiest is to get one of those cheap USB turntables, but don't expect the sound to be very good.

    One very important part of the process: Clean your vinyls the best you can. I've build my own record cleaning machine using an Ultrasonic bath, my own record cleaning solution (distillated water, Isopropyl Alcool, Kodak Photo-Flo), and vacuum (200$).

    I bought an affordable and practical used turntable: A Dual CS-5000 (500$). It's belt drive, of course! It has electronic speed control so i can easily change it without physically swapping the position of the strap. It's a very good solution and you get a lot of quality for the money. For a new turntable, i'd go with the Pro-Ject Debut Carbon Esprit SB (with speed selector knob) or the Rega Planar 2 (if you don't mind changing speed manually with strap position).

    For RIAA, i use a Rotel RQ970BX i bought many years ago. At the time i purchased it, it was a best buy. (about 500$). There is probably better today for the money (Lehmann Audio Black Cube, Arcam rPhono, etc).

    As for the soundcard, i use an Audient iD14 (400$) (i'd like to get an RME but it's expansive!!!). For less money, M-Audio M-Track 2x2 @ 130$ is quite good. There are probably many more affordable good sounding soundcards, YMMV.

    One simpler and affordable solution would be to use a good RIAA with integrated ADC and USB interface, something like the Rega Fono Mini A2D (200$) or Pro-Ject Phono Box USB V (200$).

    I use Audacity to record on my PC (free) and ClickRepair (40$) (along with manual edits). For fancy "rebeating" of human played drummer recording, you could use Ableton Live. I record / edit / process in 24 bits / 96 KHz and save in FLAC (master copy).

    I then convert in, let's say, MP3 for my car (with LAME). I normalize with bs1770gain. Other than that, the FLAC 24/96 are played on my audiophile soundsystem with Volumio plugged to my Rega DAC-R via USB.
  • mjb over 2 years ago

    Crimson69666
    the sweet background BUZZZzzzz of the direct drive motor

    I think I speak for most 1200 owners here when I say that if my 1200s ever audibly buzzed, which has never happened, I would assume something was wrong with them, or more likely I have a grounding issue somewhere in the chain. I would not blame the type of motor any more than the silver dots on the edge of the platter. 1200s are dead quiet. But if you are happy with the gear you have now, then great.
  • kurts.ear.candy over 2 years ago

    Crimson69666
    Ha ha ha, SL1200, "kurts.ear.candy" and "mvns" like the sweet background BUZZZzzzz of the direct drive motor!!! He goes as far as to thumbs down a "high end VPI", hilarious!!! If your VPI / Rega has inaccurate speed, just get it fixed, that's really not normal. Once fixed, it'll just destroy the SL1200 qualitywise. I loved the SL1200 while i was a DJ, it was the best high torque turntable for mixing, soundwise it's not remotely audiophile.
    ...

    One simpler and affordable solution would be to use a good RIAA with integrated ADC and USB interface, something like the Rega Fono Mini A2D (200$) or Pro-Ject Phono Box USB V (200$).

    I use Audacity to record on my PC (free) and ClickRepair (40$) (along with manual edits). For fancy "rebeating" of human played drummer recording, you could use Ableton Live. I record / edit / process in 24 bits / 96 KHz and save in FLAC (master copy).

    I then convert in, let's say, MP3 for my car (with LAME). I normalize with bs1770gain. Other than that, the FLAC 24/96 are played on my audiophile soundsystem with Volumio plugged to my Rega DAC-R via USB.


    While I disagree with your assessment of SL 1200's, mine sounds very nice and totally noise free using an AT15SS cart, I wholeheartedly recommend the Pro-Ject Phono Box USB V ADC for a turntable/USB interface. I use a quality Kimber USB cable from the Pro-Ject to my computer. I rip everything in 16 bit 48khz wav files for playback in my car with a USB thumb drive or on my home receiver from my computer via toslink optical. I do my ripping using Sound Forge 8.0 in 16/48 wav as mentioned above. I've made a recording of the turntable noise at idle just in case I want to remove that from my rips, but have found it pretty much unneeded.

    Just for educational purposes only of how an unmodified 1989 SL1200 through a Pro-Ject box sounds, here is a raw rip of Midnight Rambler from a 1st US press of Let It Bleed in 16/48 wav. I think most people would be satisfied with the quality of this rip. I would like to think that it might pass for an audiophile grade rip ... and in ripping vinyl, speed accuracy is of utmost importance and the SL1200's have set the world standard in that department.

    https://app.box.com/s/m2uxhkzuky11va62oiprflzmp2vfi4d0
  • gyruss2000 2 months ago

    gyruss2000 edité 2 months ago
    Hello all,

    I'm back and wanted to give you guys (and gals) an update. Approaching 7,000 records and gained experience in how I have been converting my records to digital lossless files. This is working perfectly for me now:

    1) Clean my vinyl
    2) Listen to my vinyl while recording with 1st H6 ZOOM (32GB Memory card, 96KHz 24 bit)), up to 10 releases (if release has multiple LP/12", I split to two or three separate recording files per release). The rule is to never exceed 2GB (under 60 minutes of recording time)
    3) Switch cable to 2nd H6 ZOOM, listen up to another 10 releases while recording and simultaneously do Mixdowns on 1st H6 ZOOM
    4) Transfer via USB 10 Mixdowns from 1st H6 ZOOM to my SSD 1TB hard drive on my Windows PC while still recording on 2nd H6 ZOOM
    5) Using an Excel formula (which I developed), I go to each Discogs release page then do CTRL-A & CTRL-C to copy then paste as values in Excel in cell A1. Excel formula automatically converts track listings etc. into a file name which I copy from cell A2 and paste to rename into ZOOM mixdown filename (usually under 256 characters, unless I have to manually trim after pasting to file name). Note: I don't put track names for LPs and Mini-Albums, only Title, Label and Cat#, and Discogs Release number.

    Example of filename LP filename: "George Benson – Breezin' LP (Warner Bros. Records – BS 2919) George Benson - Breezin'.WAV"
    Example of 12" or 7" filename: "Tin Tin (4) – Kiss Me (Vocal, Instrumental) (Sire – 92 97500) Tin Tin (4) - Kiss Me.WAV"

    6) I use WavePad (free) to drop in all 10+ mixdowns with updated filenames then I work from the start to end removing extra silence with pops/static. Between tracks, I remove all silence then add 1100ms of flat silence (-48dB) (you will see why later). Then I normalize all tracks (except for Accapellas which don't require 0dB normalization). I then save as... and close files by adding suffix "normalized" to filename
    7) I put all files through Izotope RZ ADVANCED software and use Declick (single band Algorithm) at strength 3.0 (minimum) for VG+ quality or NM. If there's a few more than usual static & pop, I go to 4.0 (borderline VG+). If there's a lot of static & pop (VG quality, which I rarely have) I use 5.0 strength. I NEVER exceed 5.0 (can go up to 10.0 max) because I noticed if exceeding 5.0 starts to degrade the quality of the recording. After declicking done, I save as... and close by adding another suffix "declicked" to filename
    8) I then drop all 10+ "declicked" files to WavePad then separate files at silence set to 1000ms (which works with flat silence I put earlier at 1100ms between tracks). Very fast splitting (I count the split files to match releases). I "Save to folder" same location subfolder called "Split Audio" in my SSD.

    10) After saving all split files, I then move these to my "\Split Audio\Good" folder in my 10 TB SCSI fast HD
    11) Open free software called "Switch Sound File Converter" than create MP3 320KB versions of split files which auto saves in folder called "\Split Audio\Good-MP3" so I can listen in my mobile. I ALWAYS compare file count between Good and Good-MP3 folders to match number of files. I also check all files in Switch Sound File Converter to ensure all files were processed to MP3 successfully (green check marks, not x)
    12) I also move all unsplit 96KHz 24 bit raw, normalized (if any) and declicked files into subfolder called "Vinyl Rips" in the 10 TB HD. In Discogs, I add note in my collection release page "RECORDED" so I won't re-record by forgetting.

    12) Then on to 2nd H6 ZOOM and repeat steps 3-12 (which I can do before finishing recording next set of 10 releases)

    PLAYING & RECORDING LEVELS:

    1) My mixer faders for each turntable is set to 2/3 of max (just before double lines). I record from RCA "RECORD" output from Mixer to H6 ZOOM (which I switch using a patch bay or you can use RCA female adaptors. The other end (1/4" connectors) goes to channel 1 & 3 of H6 ZOOM. Before recording each side, I do a EQ check to ensure EQ light does not exceed 0dB (avoid RED ZONE). I drop the needle in "busiest" parts of each track and check the EQ lights. This way, I avoid clipping anything. NOTE: You can record lower dB (ex. -3dB max or -6dB max), BUT when you normalize later, you will here more humming/background noise (get amplified). I have had to use IZOTOPE RX ADVANCED Denoise feature to remove that noise before normalizing in WavePad (usually for badly recorded vinyl which had background noise).

    2) H6 ZOOM EQ lights should not pass yellow (I try to hit the cusp between green and yellow, which is around 2-3dB). I set channels 1 & 3 channels gain at 5 (middle of each dial). You may have to adjust these for your system.

    3) Thanks to a DJ friend, I use SHURE WHITE LABEL cartridge/needle for best recording results (great quality sound and not too expensive).

    I can record up to 50. YES 50 vinyl releases a week, if mostly 12"/7". Mixed with LPs, usually, 30 to 40 a week. THIS IS AFTER MY FULL TIME DAY JOB so you can record even 100 a week full-time if you are retired, etc.

    I hope this helps.
  • taumelek about 1 month ago

    taumelek edité about 1 month ago
    gyruss2000
    Minimum cost of system
    Artcessaries Preamp $100
    Shure White Label $140
    Cables/accessaries $50
    Acousta Premium v6 $150 or Cool Edit Pro 2.1 around $100 on eBay
    i7 cpu and 32GB ram and many terrabites HD system

    great to see you achieving your goal
    I'm currently just going for a Rega Fono with USB to digitize some of my records via Audacity
  • rappard 6 days ago

    Has anyone used the Tascam US-122MKII for 24/96 vinyl rips? Any good?

    (Rest of my equipment:
    * Rega P3-24 with Goldring 2100 MM
    * Creek 5350SE with Creek MM SE phono card
    * ThinkPad laptop with Windows 10)

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