• vpeteg over 4 years ago

    Okay, I recently moved to a new apartment and I bought myself a second hand turntable (a technics sl-5200 in good condition).
    When I played my first record on it, I noticed that it skips when I walked around in my room. I had rebalanced it when I set it up, but I did it again, just to be sure I didn't make any mistakes the first time, but this didn't seem to solve the problem. It still skips a groove every time I place my foot on the floor (even when I do so very gently), and to make it even worse, it also skips when my upstairs neighbour walks around heavily. (Luckily I didn't start with playing a very valuable record).
    I live in an house with wooden floors almost everywhere and my turntable is currently placed on my desk (which is also out of wood). I might buy a small table or something to put my turntable on, but it will probably be made out of wood as well.

    Does anyone know any solutions to this? I was thinking of going to a DIY shop and buy a thick rubber mat to put underneath it, but I'm not sure if that will help.
    I would rather not spend a lot of money on specialized equipment, as I'm a student and I don't have unlimited recourses.

    Thanks!
  • little_alien over 4 years ago

    little_alien edited over 4 years ago
    Perhaps put it on a wall shelf? It's a common solution to prevent unwanted vibrations reaching your turntable.

    or perhaps these: http://www.juno.co.uk/products/free-float-deck-stabilizers-black/254042-01/
  • vpeteg over 4 years ago

    little_alien
    Perhaps put it on a wall shelf? It's a common solution to prevent unwanted vibrations reaching your turntable.

    or perhaps these: http://www.juno.co.uk/products/free-float-deck-stabilizers-black/254042-01/


    a wall shelf is sadly not an option, I'm not allowed to make holes in the wall (except if you would know a way to hang a wall shelf with thumb tacks).
    Those deck stabilizer look like a good option tho, hope I can find a store that has them in stock
  • stevo1 over 4 years ago

    Try adjusting the balance of the tonearm but reduce the 'float'.
    Thereby increasing the weight of the tonearm on the vinyl.
    If no joy try a paving stone under the deck and or a block of foam.
    No need to buy anything fancy or expensive.
    I notice you say it's a new turntable to you.Have you tried in another environment ?.
    It could be the turntable or stylus.
  • Sombunya over 4 years ago

    Another possibility is the anti-skating force is set incorrectly. If the stylus jumps inward, too little, outward, too much.
  • HM-2 over 4 years ago

    This is a common problem in old buildings with wooden floors. If it's not needle skipping you will hear every step you take as a thumping sound instead. The only remedy that is not cost intensive is placing the turntable on an object that is as heavy as possible which will thus absorb the vibration from the floor when you walk around the room. I had the same problem in the first appartment I had moved in. Those deck absorbers might help but ultimately it's better to use a heavy object as table in order to eliminate vibration from the floor as much as you can. Alternatively you can try placing something heavy under the table which you use for your deck (likely no fun to look at though).
  • seveninch over 4 years ago

    I used to have the same problem but solved it by placing a concrete garden tile under the turntable. Cheap and heavy. Looks rough in a cool kind of way.
  • d_fedorov over 4 years ago

    As many people have already said, before buying stuff you should try some zero-cost actions (unless you have exhausted these already): adjust the tracking force to the factory recommended and antiskating to match the tracking force.

    I would also add: ascertain that the TT is horizontal in both North-South and East-West directions (a bubble level would do).

    I did have a similar problem, which went away after I moved the TT almost into the room corner, where the floor boards have less swing. That said, the TT also sits atop 3 music machines, totalling probably 50-60 lbs (20-25 kg), which I imagine absorbs more kinetic energy than a stand-alone TT would.

    I never had any luck with sorbo pads.

  • DJMONEYMIKE29 over 4 years ago

    " a concrete garden tile under the turntable. "

    +1
  • heavymetalmaniac over 4 years ago

    A concrete garden tile on top of the stylus!!!
  • vpeteg over 4 years ago

    My TT is certainly set up correctly, I checked the balance in both direction, and the tracking force and anti-skating are set to the factory recommended for my specific needle.
    I will try a garden tile, or something along those lines first, in the hope that that solves it.
    Thanks for the help!
  • vpeteg over 4 years ago

    heavymetalmaniac
    A concrete garden tile on top of the stylus!!!


    This would certainly make some very heavy music!
  • crazyowen over 4 years ago

    Hang them from the ceiling?
    Tennis balls cut in half, one under each foot of the turntable can help.
    definitely try the adding mass to your setup in some way like cinder blocks, etc.
    Get your setup as close to a wall as possible and choose the wall where the floor moves/bounces the least.
  • abecedarians over 4 years ago

    Don't walk...CRAWL!!
  • tsivihcra over 4 years ago

    vpeteg
    This would certainly make some very heavy music!


    Heavy rock music to be sure, not heavy metal music.
  • SeRKeT over 4 years ago

    the direction in which the floorboards are laid can make a difference, place the turntable(s) somewhere that does not align with the floorboards where you walk, this is how i did it years back and it stopped the skipping problems
  • RiP057 over 4 years ago

    I would just increase the counter balance weight
  • HM-2 over 4 years ago

    awesome advise, R.I.P. to your record collection
  • turntable_life over 4 years ago

    Wall mounts are a nice way to go if you are having this problem, as others have said.
    A really cool product are Iso feet, which will absorb vibrations as well, and aren't crazy priced. http://www.brightstaraudio.com/
    You can also do the stone slate thing, and create a sandwhich of that and maybe a piece of thick wood with a product called TACMAT between the two surfaces which will absorb the energy of the vibration.
    http://www.sounddeadener.com/Dynamat/TacMat/index.htm

    Do NOT do the following...overwieght your needle to force it on your records..even if the needle isn't jumping you'll be damaging your stylus, records, and still be HEARING the footsteps.
    Best of luck.
  • witzpdx over 4 years ago

    Careful with those IsoNodes - they stain furniture and sometimes can bond with paint/wood. FYI. Similar products exist.
  • rootdown_fm over 4 years ago

    Paving slab, half tennis balls on that and ANOTHER slab atop THAT - saw that in a wooden floored club once. Assuming they are actually OK to begin with, don't f**k with your tracking or balance to solve this - your records may suffer.
  • Groovemaster-DJ over 4 years ago

    you need two items
    1. A nice wedge of foam rubber
    2. Paving slab

    put paving slab on top of foam sit turntable on top of slab make sure that the four feet are not screwed uptight but loose, do not use a silly thin felt slip mat but a proper thick rubber matt as supplied do NOT over track

    End of floor vibration bouncing and RUMBLE

    note putting a floor free wall shelf up many not help as the joists and things sit on wall hangers so it will transmit to the walls but good luck

    To finally illiminate ANY possibilty of rumble buy a Stanton ST100 and use the digital output not phono
  • Sombunya over 4 years ago

    If I can add one more thing; I was digitizing some vinyl once, using headphones, and I could hear ambient sounds, voices etc. coming through between tracks when the silent part of the groove was playing. That tells me that unless steps are taken to separate the TT from the information coming from the speakers real sound degradation will occur.

    When I was a tyke many years ago my father placed his Garrard TT in a hallway closet, completely isolated from the listening area. A good idea. Today when I digitize vinyl the speakers are kept way down low. FWIW.
  • ELIMINATION over 4 years ago

    concrete slabs & 1200's
  • little_alien over 4 years ago

    Groovemaster-DJ
    To finally illiminate ANY possibilty of rumble buy a Stanton ST100 and use the digital output not phono

    Nonsense. Rumble is something the stylus picks up from the engine or mechanism through the platter and will be present in both analog and digital output. If you experience less "rumble" through a digital output check the grounding and isolation of your analog output cables, plugs, pre-amp etc.
  • Sombunya over 4 years ago


    little_alien
    Rumble is something the stylus picks up from the engine or mechanism through the platter and will be present in both analog and digital output.

    alien is obviously paying attention to this thread.
  • little_alien over 4 years ago

    Sombunya
    alien is obviously paying attention to this thread.

    I have a wooden floor in my new house too and I haven't set up my turntable yet, so yes ;)
  • Zuishi over 4 years ago

    Think about the building construction when choosing the best place to put the turntable. Pick an area with the least flex and most solidly connected to the ground (even if not on the first floor.) This is usually and outside wall corner but not always.

    Though you should take the above advice and not overweight the tracking, make sure you are right at the high end of any stated range. Damage from the stylus bouncing out of the groove, or even just chattering around in it, is far more likely than from too much pressure.

    Is the cart a good match for the arm?

    Good luck!
  • DJMONEYMIKE29 over 4 years ago

    "concrete slabs & 1200's"

    +1
  • DutchSmoke over 4 years ago

    Weight up that table where the TT sits on. its the only solution. Concrete slabs will do
  • photoguy over 4 years ago

    My turntables in my mancave in the basement that is on a concrete slab.
    I can do jumping jacks and it wont skip.
    So the concept is the same as above. The more weight that it sits on the the better dampening effect.
  • SeRKeT over 4 years ago

    photoguy
    The more weight that it sits on the the better dampening effect.

    this is good advice
    and remember as i said in my above post.. if you align the decks up in the right direction it will help greatly too for example

    ------------------------------------- (turnables) --------------------------------------------------
    floor boards ^^

    and not the other way round
    | | | <---floorboards
    | | |
    (turnables)
    | | | <---floorboards
    it makes a hell of a difference :)
  • hype1_nl over 4 years ago

    If the floor is shakey, then a concrete slab connected to this floor will shake as well so these won't make much difference. Attaching the turntable to the wall is by far the best solution when these problems occur.
  • Casketkrusher over 4 years ago

    Find a solid area, and make sure you have enough weight on your tonearm.
  • o6eah over 4 years ago

    You need a swimmingpool and a small boat.
  • little_alien over 4 years ago

    o6eah
    You need a swimmingpool and a small boat.

    What to do in case of tsunami?
  • Pirate_punk over 4 years ago

    Take away its rope usually works
  • konkordski over 4 years ago

    Don't walk around.
  • jussumen over 4 years ago

    A camping table could help. Early Rap DJ's often used those to prevent the needle from jumping when the crowd started jumping around. Of course that will only help a bit. The trick with the Temmis balls cut in half is best, so far. Try them as direct dumping forces first. If problem still occurs place a wooden plate on top of the one half of those balls . You can add another sandwich with the other halves unless it gets too wobbly.
    But seriousely - get a Project wall mount shelve and the problem is fixed for good. you don't need lot of big holes for that. Just do it and close the hole(s9 when you move out.
  • AMJacker over 4 years ago

    I hang mine from the ceiling but if you have neighbors above...
  • DJMONEYMIKE29 over 4 years ago

    "I hang mine from the ceiling but if you have neighbors above..."

    Actually, this system is great if you can "swing it" :)

    No, seriously, I have spun at quite a few clubs over the years that had the booth TT's suspended from the ceiling. They worked great as long as they have a way to stabilize the swinging motion. Nothing worse than trying to spin when the TT's are moving and you've had a few drinks!!
  • webkrawler over 4 years ago

    webkrawler edited over 4 years ago
    I had the same problem.

    What I did was purchase from Amazon an Isolate It: Sorbothane Vibration Isolation Circular Disc Pad .5" (1.27cm) Thick x 2.5" (6.35cm) Dia. 50 Duro - 4 Pack and put them under the feet of my turntable. I also have a glass pane extra so I bought 1.5" Sorbothane Hemisphere Rubber Bumper Non-Skid Feet with Adhesive 50 Durometer - 4-Pack and put them under the glass pane and then put the turntable on top of the pane using the Isolation Circular Disc Pads. Worked like a charm.
  • crazyowen over 4 years ago

    http://thehearthforge.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/weaving-table-1.jpg

    would also work if you have the time and materials handy, they can be inexpensive to make a table with straps like this and have it come out fairly cool but highly functional to your needs.

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