• SpinThatRecords over 8 years ago

    Here is a fun topic, we all worry and talk about what to clean our records with, there has been many great suggestions and products mentioned, but I have talked to a couple record "collectors" and "sellers" and I have been shocked by what they tell they use , their "secret" method one guys uses hand sanitizer and another swears by Toothpaste to clean his 45's ! he said make sure it's Colgate ! there is the guy who used a little baby oil to make the record shine and the guy who uses Dawn dish detergent and a high pressure stream of faucet water to wash it off, it makes me wonder if anyone else out there has heard of any weird things people use to clean records, also you can take this as a little warning before buying a record ask the seller what they use to clean their records, if it's toothpaste I suggest you pass on the record !
  • bmolsbeck over 8 years ago

    I know a second hand shop which uses (a rather cheap) aftershave to clean the records with. :-)
  • double-happiness over 8 years ago

    Never use alcohol-based cleaners on Shellac (78s) - it will discolour the record, turning it grey. I've heard dilute shower gel is quite good for cleaning Shellac though.
  • SpinThatRecords over 8 years ago

    bmolsbeck , LOL,aftershave! Wow at least the records smelled good! Thanks
    @doible-happiness, shower gel there's a good one, thanks
  • brunorepublic over 8 years ago

    Dawn is actually a very good vinyl cleaning agent. I was astounded to discover it works just as well as many expensive vinyl cleaning solutions.
  • SpinThatRecords over 8 years ago

    Ok I'll give you the dawn but just got to watch out for residue dawn is thick , thanks
  • CuriousMutation over 8 years ago

    Read in a book years ago a process for cleaning LPs, it's always worked for me.

    Under a light stream of cool water (not cold/not hot), wet the LP in a circular motion being sure not to get the label wet. On a soft, wet sponge apply a tiny bit of dishwashing soap, clean the LP in a circular motion by soaping down the vinyl (don't get the label wet). Rinse the LP well under the light stream of water from the sink, dry and buff LP in a circular motion with a clean, dry cotton cloth.

    This process should be used only in exteme cases, such as second hand store records that have been previously poorly cared for. I've cleaned LPs in this manner hundreds of times over the years without a problem except for an occasional water stain on the label.
  • token007 over 8 years ago

    When you use the wood glue method, make sure you get the polyurethane kind of glue. Allow for 24 hours of drying before peeling it off. A little trick is to apply it to as many records possible at once and leave them to dry together, it improves the glue's cleaning performance.
  • ShadowEgo over 8 years ago

    "nail polish remover" is a no-no !!! Tried it once and it also removed the actual grooves of the record... #stupidexperiment
  • mrmrb over 8 years ago

    steel wool is a bad idea
  • CykoMF over 8 years ago

    I can personally verify the positive benefits of using Dawn dish soap. I can further testify that the original 'blue' formula is superior to the newer 'green' variation.

    To clarify, one does not apply the liquid soap directly to the vinyl. It is to be mixed with lukewarm water creating a frothy sudsy bath. I use this for salvaging very dirty records that would be otherwise unusable. Or as a pre-wash for records stained with stuff I wouldn't want getting onto my cleaning equipment.

    While I have encountered some oily records before, possibly from the previously mentions baby oil treatment, and Dawn worked wonders cleaning them. Even after other dirt and grime had attracted itself to the oil. It's very effective against greasy fingerprints!

    After a clean water rinse, blot with a towel and set in a rack to air dry for a bit is usually sufficient to produce a playable record. If the record condition is VG+ or better I'll usually follow up with a spin on the Nitty Gritty machine.

    I have also seen the effects of acetone on vinyl, somewhere I have an old Beatles record with my sisters thumbprint permanently melted into the grooves. And yes, it sounds as horrible as it looks.

    Rubbing Alcohol is also a bad idea, especially on styrene 45's.

    For my contribution to this thread I'll choose: Magic Erasers
  • zippy72 over 8 years ago

    We did actually iron one of my records to remove the warping... OK, left the B side unplayable but it worked for the A side...

    Of course, for the ultimate bad result in cleaning vinyl, may I suggest a quick trip through the dishwasher? Followed by a cycle in the tumble dryer to dry it off... ;-) #DidIWin
  • ryosuke63 over 8 years ago

    Rubbing alcohol seems to be a very polarizing thing in this topic. Some say it's terrible, some say it's good. I've never had any problem with it. What's the big deal? Just dilute it 50/50 with water on a soft cloth.
  • Manys over 8 years ago

    toothpaste is an abrasive, you've been hanging out with dickheads. next time one of them talks like this ask them to bring their most valuable 7" and clean it that way.
  • AMJacker over 8 years ago

    water and lightly soapy water sponge works for me.

    BBQ grate grill brush does not work well.
  • DIFFO over 8 years ago

    Setting your album on fire for a split second using petrol followed by a damp cloth or a bucket of water gets rid of dust
  • DIFFO over 8 years ago


    bmolsbeck
    I know a second hand shop which uses (a rather cheap) aftershave to clean the records with. :-)


    Good call, forget petrol, use eau de toilette then set them on fire. Best of both
  • Zyron over 8 years ago

  • Dr.SultanAszazin over 8 years ago

    Dr.SultanAszazin edited over 8 years ago
    This works fantastic:

    Scatter some calcium carbonate or cement powder on your record, then sprinkle some hydrochoric acid on it and rub with a soft cloth.

    (Warning: this is a joke, please don't try this for real! This might be hazardous for your health!)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IY2aWFhU0SM
  • etrm over 8 years ago

    go with distilled water and Alcohol 99% Isopropyl... do a 50/50 mix... you are go to clean... http://www.discogs.com/groups/topic/360223 for more details... happy cleaning...

    eTRm
  • Little_Red over 8 years ago

    Anyone used lighter fluid before? Im a Fairy Liquid kind of guy but my mate swears by it
  • vercorsman over 8 years ago

    yes a 50% of distilled water and 50% Isopropyl alcohol mixture is the best way to get your Vinyls cleaned so you can whipe off dust dirty stuff by using a smooth special brush that you can find on good Internet store.
  • AMJacker over 8 years ago

    it's best to just throw away any records with dust or fingerprints on them. Break them into small peices and put them down the kitchen garbage disposal or bathroom toilet. If you can;t find another new copy of the same record just grab any other new record. It's time you expanded your musical horizions anyhow.
  • Adam_S over 8 years ago

    Adam_S edited over 8 years ago
    it's best to just throw away any records with dust or fingerprints on them. Break them into small peices and put them down the kitchen garbage disposal or bathroom toilet. If you can;t find another new copy of the same record just grab any other new record. It's time you expanded your musical horizions anyhow. [quote=AMJacker][/quote]

    LOL!
  • o6eah over 8 years ago

    I just toss a couple records on the Floor and vacum the beejezus out of them with my trusty hoover.
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago

    Doc_Smiley edited over 8 years ago
    double-happiness
    Never use alcohol-based cleaners on Shellac (78s) - it will discolour the record, turning it grey. I've heard dilute shower gel is quite good for cleaning Shellac though.


    Had a friend a few years back that used his VPI vacuum extraction record cleaning machine with a mixture of isopropyl alcohol & distilled water as his cleaning solution. This is fine for vinyl, as that's how I clean my vinyl LP's. But what he failed to realize is that his older 78's are made from shellac. The 78 became soft, almost gooey, and its layers began to separate.
    I've cleaned many 78's over the years with great success using a simple mixture of distilled water and liquid dish soap. I'd then rinse with straight distilled water, and extract on my VPI record cleaning machine.
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago

    Doc_Smiley edited over 8 years ago
    I have two VPI record cleaning machines; VPI Typhoon, and a VPI .HW - 16.5;
    http://vpiindustries.com/main_cleaning.htm

    I also own a Nitty Gritty 2.5 FI;
    http://www.nittygrittyinc.com/Fi%20Model%20views.htm

    And an Okki Nokki:
    http://www.okkinokki.com/

    Very worthwhile investment for the serious collector. or anyone that actually cares about their records and/or cartridge/stylus. I cannot imagine life without a vacuum extraction machine..

    When I first started using these types of machines nearly 20 years ago, I would use the cleaning solutions provided by the manufacturer. In this case it was VPI. But over time I found I could make far better mixtures on my own, at a fraction of the cost. Using a combination of distilled water, 99% isopropyl alcohol, and sometimes a very small amount of degreasing agent such as mild liquid dish soap (1 or 2 drops) into the mix. Once in awhile I'll even add a bit of camera lens cleaning solution.

    Sadly, many who own these machines still don't really know how to use them properly. It takes some people a few months (in same cases much much longer) to really hone their technique; pre-soaking (very important, especially with hardened mold), brushing style, suction time, etc. I've seen videos on YouTube where guys turn the vacuum on for 10 seconds, and consider that enough time for debris and solution to be extracted. Trust me...it's not.

    When used properly, I consider these vacuum extraction machines the ONLY truly effective way to clean a record. All of the other methods I've seen the last 50 years or so are a joke...smearing cleaning solutions (or soapy tap water...a vinyl no no...harmful microscopic minerals in hard water) all over your LP's with a sponge or cloth, embedding dirt and other particles deeper into the grooves, while at the same time convincing yourself that you're actually cleaning the record. This is what kept the manufactures of those silly LP cleaning products alive during the 70's/80's. Boy were we stupid (Discwasher and D4+ are prime examples of this). .
    Many still fail to realize that whatever residual is left behind or deposited by non-extraction methods will over time collect and bake onto your stylus due to heat caused by friction during rotation. Not good for the stylus/cartridge, or the vinyl. The cleaner your records are, the happier your stylus is, which in turn prolongs the life and condition of your vinyl collection. Plus you'll hear things the way they're meant to be heard.

    In my opinion vacuum extraction is the only way, despite what some guy with a can of wood glue on YouTube tells you.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gyvipBs6Vs

    Your Colgate toothpaste story is funny. I've actually used that as a mild abrasive on a badly scratched CD that I signed out from the public library once. It worked wonders, but I'd never use it on a vinyl record, Lol.
  • DIFFO over 8 years ago

    I put jam on mine and get my dog to lick it off

    Im talking about my vinyl albums here
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago

    Doc_Smiley edited over 8 years ago
    DIFFO
    I put jam on mine and get my dog to lick it off


    Brown bears & honey also works very well. i hung mine out in the forest one night dripping in honey, only to find it licked clean and shiny the following morning.

    I'm talking about my vinyl albums here ;)
  • disruptive-influence over 8 years ago

    Wire wool and plenty of heat from a brazing torch!

    I'd never clean my records like that though :)
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago

    Doc_Smiley edited over 8 years ago
    I've sandblasted a few LP's. Not only are they clean, but they have an entirely unique sound now.
  • Dezie over 8 years ago

    Doc_Smiley

    DIFFO
    I put jam on mine and get my dog to lick it off

    Brown bears & honey also works very well. i hung mine out in the forest one night dripping in honey, only to find it licked clean and shiny the following morning.

    I'm talking about my vinyl albums here ;)


    Thanks both. I didn't know this technique worked with albums. I do something similar with my 7 inches
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago


    Dezie

    Thanks both. I didn't know this technique worked with albums. I do something similar with my 7 inches


    Hey.if it worked on my 12 inches, I'm sure your significantly smaller 7 inches won't be a challenge.
  • Dezie over 8 years ago

    Doc, nice idea but you're not thinking this through. If I go with your technique, I'll have to hang my 7 inches on the lower branches so the bears can reach. But if I do that, your 12 inches probably won't get licked at all. For your sake, I'm going to stick with my saucer of milk and the cat technique. It works and I'm very happy.
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago

    Doc_Smiley edited over 8 years ago
    Dezie
    I'll have to hang my 7 inches on the lower branches so the bears can reach.


    I guess we'll have to find us some low laying bush.
  • AMJacker over 8 years ago

    Stick them in your washing machine on delicate. Only use scent free detergent. DO NOT use the extra rinse cycle as 2 spin cycles might be a little much.
    Put them in the dryer, on low heat, with one over-sized beach towel and five Snuggle Fabric Softener Dryer Sheets (again unscented, unless you want your records smelling like a girl).
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago


    AMJacker
    Stick them in your washing machine on delicate.


    I find the perma-press cycle works well too.
  • BeastlyMandible over 8 years ago

    Nothing tends to bring the shine out like some Kerosene, in my humble opinion.
  • CykoMF over 8 years ago

    Them snuggle sheets also help to eliminate static.
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago


    CykoMF
    Them snuggle sheets also help to eliminate static.


    Before or after sand-blasting?
  • AMJacker over 8 years ago

  • djgurygury over 8 years ago

    I pee on mine then wipe them with toilet papers and dirty diapers....
  • Doc_Smiley over 8 years ago

    djgurygury
    I pee on mine then wipe them with toilet papers and dirty diapers....

    Dirty diapers work great...especially on shitty vinyl. I've never tried peeing on my records. Makes perfect sense though. In pre-industrial times urine, being rich in ammonia, was used as a cleaning fluid. It was was also used for whitening teeth in Ancient Rome. Must try this soon!

  • DjKidCorruption over 8 years ago

    random i know but any1 ever thought of using VINYL CLEANER? but not any old vinyl cleaner VINYL FLOOR CLEANER!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stikatak-Vinyl-Floor-Cleaner-Spray/dp/B00465HXL4

    I wonder if that will work?
    any brave people let us know!
    DJKIDC
  • 33602 over 8 years ago

    "Daily Use Will Prevent Dirt Build Up"
    that quote on that Stikatak cleaner hides so much truth you wont believe it. Lol, just made my day.
    Floorcleaners veeery often got waxes and evil hardening oils (pinetree, tungoil etc) in them and try to build up (protective) layer. That makes the record look good and sound like a party in the neighbors place, a highlight any collector is searching for.

Log In You must be logged in to post.