• DEGASPERI over 5 years ago

    on the linked page you find all infos about that stuff,
    also a video (which i am watching right now).
    is that fluid worth to buy and to test it?
    http://www.recordrevirginizer.com/
  • little_alien over 5 years ago

    ...back to their original condition by using a revolutionary anti-static polymer that acts like a facemask on the grooves of your records.

    Sounds scary to me. So what it basically does is laminate the grooves with a "protective" layer? What about:

    - laminating dirt and dust particles with it
    - filling up the deep ens of the groove muffling the high frequencies
    - does the stuff age as well as vinyl?
  • DEGASPERI over 5 years ago

    after i posted it i rememberd that we had allreday something similar to this fluid , wasn`t it a kind of wax to put on the vinyl?
  • cypherism over 5 years ago


    DEGASPERI
    is that fluid worth to buy and to test it?

    We won't know unless you buy it and test it !
  • remkowski over 5 years ago

    DEGASPERI
    wasn`t it a kind of wax to put on the vinyl

    No, wood glue.
    http://www.discogs.com/groups/topic/207482
  • tekkno-guy over 5 years ago

    looks like it will get all the crap out of the grooves, but it takes 8 hours to dry and the bottle it tiny. how many records can I clean with one bottle.

    Restoration? Nope, just a cleaner.
  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    I have just received 2 bottles from OZ (it's quite expensive!)

    I have 3 records (really poor playing records) covered in the stuff - will report tomorrow when it has set, I've pulled the stuff off the records and played them.....
  • little_alien over 5 years ago

    Cool, looking forward to the result.
  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    I have done 6 12"singles with this stuff.

    It is the best cleaner I have found so far, but don't expect it to remove all the clicks & pops from badly abused records, because it doesn't. Whilst it removes the worst clicks & pops and gives a very, very clean and crisp playback, it won't resurrect 'Bargain Basement/Charity Shop' purchases.

    If your record was not too bad to start with, it will REALLY improve the sound quality, and the difference is staggering.

    If your record was abused, with lots of minor scratches, dust & crap - you'll get a very good clear playback, but you still get quite a lot of the pops & crackles, although the result is a definite improvement. It does remove the soft/muffled sound of abused records.

    It makes a G record VG/VG+

    I would suggest it is better than any record cleaner I have experienced, including mechanical ones like the VPL cleaner some Oggers swear by.

    This stuff is bit messy to use and tricky to get the hang of - and very expensive (2 bottles & postage from Australia was £100.00!!). It also takes at least 10-12 hours, and in the UK autumn a bit longer, to dry, so that's 24+ hours for both sides!!

    I think it was worth it, and it does save all that washing with alcohol/washing up liquid/drying/vacuming .....
  • STEVELAWLESS over 5 years ago

    jaimiej, Have you tried that wood glue method before, and does this compare?
  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    No I haven't tried wood glue, as I'm not sure which wood glue to use, and didn't fancy wrecking of my records trying - even crap playback ones!

    This Reviginizer is some sort of glue/plastic resin, but it peels off the records very easily when dry, and you can remove any residue you leave behind without any difficulty.

    The records I have tried with this stuff were the worst playing in my collection (pops, crackles, muffled - my old DJ abuse copies etc) and I am listening to the results, and I am quite impressed.

    All of the records I have treated so far I had previously cleaned with methylated spirits then washed with washing up liquid, rinsed, dried, but they didn't sound as good as they do now

    I now have another 8 records drying, including 2 that have skips, and I'll see if it removes the skips - then I really will be impressed!!

    I did try it on a record that has a rumble from heavy stylus use, but it didn't make that any better - I'll bin that record!
  • Qpchan over 5 years ago

    I used the LGL gel product, very satisfied with it.
    Cost 9 euros (less if you order a bunch of them) and you can do around 20-30 vinyls (both sides of an LP), depending on how you're good at dosing the stuff. It's a cleaning gel & just does that, it cleans the record.
    100 quid for something that might just do the same seems crazy.

    @ jamiej-80sdisco, thanks for your useful report, try & get that LGL stuff to compare.
  • little_alien over 5 years ago

    Thanks for the results, but I'll stick to my local wet cleaning solvent. Had great results with that too. http://www.discogs.com/groups/topic/210717
  • Dr.SultanAszazin over 5 years ago


    jamiej-80sdisco
    I'll see if it removes the skips

    I remove more than 90% of the skips with my thumbnail... (Fly shit is the most difficult to remove... learned me never to leave a record on a turntable overnight, except with the doors completely closed.
    (doors of the cupboard my turntable is in, I mean)
  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    jamiej-80sdisco
    including 2 that have skips


    Yes it does remove small skips, if they are not physical damage to the grooves.

    I have now used two bottles of this stuff, and have been really impressed with it. The difference in listening to 25 year old records is quite astounding after using the gunk - another improvement has been to use a more expensive cartridge & stylus too!

  • DEGASPERI over 5 years ago


    what is OZ?
  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    DEGASPERI
    OZ?

    = Australia

    Until a few weeks ago, you could only buy the product from Australia. It is now available in other countries (see their web site), making the postage much more affordable.

    I have bought another three bottles from the UK supplier, and this cost me £105.00 with postage. One bottle will do about 40 12" record sides, so this works out at about £3.00 per record (if you do both sides!) - which can be cheaper than trying to buy a better condition copy of the record (in most cases), so IMO it is quite good value.
  • Majus over 5 years ago

    whoops double-post
  • Majus over 5 years ago

    STEVELAWLESS
    Have you tried that wood glue method before, and does this compare?


    I've used the wood glue cleaning method MANY times. It works fantastic when you get the hang of it.

    This is the best source of information about it: http://www.audiokarma.org/forums/showthread.php?t=99837

    I haven't used the product in question though.
  • STEVELAWLESS over 5 years ago

    I tried it with "school glue" its a translucent blue like the virginizer, thinner than elmers or wood. It didnt dry even , I may not have used enough or its not thick enough, but for the majority was an impressive show. Seems like something that takes practice. Im going to order the virginizer to compare to whats available off the shelf.
  • AMJacker over 5 years ago


    jamiej-80sdisco
    It makes a G record VG/VG+

    I don't know about that. the record is played out at that point and you can not bring back full fidelity and so it could never be VG+ again. right? Once it's "worn" you can clean it all you want but it'll never have the same grooves as new/VG+.
  • manus-von-alles over 5 years ago

    @ AMJacker that's correct. I've done lots of experiments to clean up my records. It's a question, what's kind of dirt, you have to remove. Now I use just a mircofibre cloth, some rainwater and a very smal amength of dishwashing detergent. The point is, to use hot water. It's still the same, as if you clean up your dishes. But be aware, you can't remove everything with this easy mix, even you use the hot water. In some cases, you have to use some alcohol. Exactly the same, as elsewhere, too. So first do a cleanup with water, and if it did not work, use alcohol. That's my way. To dry it, I use some old, often washed cloth, maybe bedclothes. Best would be a soft kind of linen or something like that.
    Please don't tell me, there is anything for all. Same as in normal live, u have to use different means, for different reasons. That's the truth.

    If u enjoy to spend a lot of money, no problem. Get one of this expensive machines and you will be as satisfied, I'm without it.
    The one will use a carwash at a fillingstation, another do it by hand. Who gets the cleaner car? Maybe it's more fashion to use a machine...

    Last but not least, I don't "believe" into this stuff, described above. It will remove the upper level of the dirt, and for that reason, works fine, most of the time... But I don't want to spend a lot of money and I don't want to wait for 8 hours.

    The truth is easy all of the time.
  • 4pwclm over 5 years ago

    Any one out there tried L'Art Du Son in a vaccum machine
  • cypherism over 5 years ago

    manus-von-alles
    Now I use just a mircofibre cloth, some rainwater

    Rain water ! (water, acid, pollutants, dirt, sulphur, dead skin etc) NICE !
  • manus-von-alles over 5 years ago

    @ cypherism yes Rain water ! What did you know about water ? Have you ever heard about Viktor Schauberger? Water is something different than just H2O. Indeed, rainwater is a bit acid. Pollutants and dirt, if there is some, goes to the ground, after a while. Dead skin? Okay, I understood. I don't live in West Yorkshire , England. You seems to have a very special rain there. If you think it's better, use faucet water. If you think it's necessary to buy water, than try that.
    Anyway, my records get clean. It's the same with the high end - freaks. They think, music has an optical basement. Everything has to be polished, chromed and gilded. Than it sounds much better. A mahagony veener sound better than spruce and so on. If you have enough money and you believe into that myths, so why not get happy with it?
  • iLL_WiLL over 5 years ago

    Haven't tried the Revirginizer, but Gruv-Glide works amazing. It cleans, protects, de-static and lubricates. makes old, used records sound brand new. and 1 can coats 100-150 records. also get 2 awesome microfiber cleaning pads. def worth the money
  • psil0777 over 5 years ago

    Just ordered 2 bottles of re-virginizer. I have tried different wood-glues but at least i have experienced bad results, theres always some tiny wood-glue dots which are hard to remove. record looks clean but now theres some left-overs of wood-glue which are hard to remove.
  • massivemidget over 5 years ago

    Hi Guys,
    I see you are all keen on trying all these REALLY expensive ways on cleaning vinyl, but i have found one that cleans, removes static and makes your records look and play like new (but not if they are scratched obviously)

    I rinse my vinyl in a lukewarm water bath. Edge of the record to the bottom of a basin and water filled till it's just short of the label. Lift the record out and spray a small amount of Vanish Oxi Action powerspray Carpet & Upholestery stain remover. Must be this, nothing else will do. See here for a visual.
    http://www.great4homes.co.uk/products/217895/

    I lightly sponge this around the vinyl on both sides for a minute or two then wait for another minute to let it do it's job. Then rinse in lukewarm water, and leave to stand for an hour to dry.
    The results are outstanding. I found this by accident when i ran out of my usual expensive product. I thought, if it's ok for your carpets, it certainly can't damage plastic. I have been using this for years and my vinyl is still playing as good as the day i used it. Please try it and let me know. It's only about £4 and will last about 100 lps if not more!
    Cheers
  • ajtonic over 5 years ago

    manus-von-alles
    Now I use just a mircofibre cloth,


    microfiber is nice, right on ...

    some rainwater and a very smal amength of dishwashing detergent.


    Rainwater!!! WTF!!! Doh! Cmon people this is not the dark ages anymore! Jeebus tits use DISTILLED water. I will take the pepsi challenge with your rainwater anyday

    The point is, to use hot water.


    since when? theres no need for that , room temp. is just fine, in fact too hot will warp the record !!!

    It's still the same, as if you clean up your dishes. But be aware, you can't remove everything with this easy mix, even you use the hot water.


    Yeah no shit>?

    In some cases, you have to use some alcohol.


    NOOOOO!!!! Seriously stop giving out bogus tips please...lol. Alcohol is very harsh and absolutely unnecessary and will cause vinyl polymyers to degrade/break down faster in the long run.

    Use an alcohol free detergent / record cleaner. There are plenty out there now.

  • AncOld over 5 years ago

    Oh Vanish really !!!
    and window washer it works also ?
  • AncOld over 5 years ago

    ajtonic
    Use DISTILLED water. I will take the pepsi challenge with your rainwater anyday


    Yes, I use generally distilled water. It work well but when there is the grime on old vinyls 1950s-1960s, this is always dirty.

  • Aftering_at_my_way over 5 years ago

    Aftering_at_my_way edited over 5 years ago
    4pwclm
    Any one out there tried L'Art Du Son in a vaccum machine


    Me, all the time. Use it everyday on a VPI 16.5, works perfect.

    Art Du Son is nice because it doesn't contain bad chemical products or alcohol that could damage your vinyl. As a plus, even if not important, it also smells good.. :-)

    Have this thing since more then a year, and still with my first bottle of Art Du Son. Already cleaned hundreds and hundreds of vinyl with it, using the exact proportions between the product and distilled water. (no calcium in water)

    It also helps on brand new records, because most of us would probably have seen it: you order a new record online, and when you receive it, you see a finger on it or some dust or little particles, paperpieces of the new innersleeve, etc..

    1 side wash is a mater of 30 seconds (maybe 45 seconds) and your record is very vacuum clean and dry + antistatic! All the dirt goes into the tube, and so it doesn't push the dirt more into the grooves like with normal hand cleaning fluids..

    Lot of people are scary about the price, but make your endprice on 10 years.. I bought my VPI 500 € + 35 € art du son.. On 10 years I would need approx 5 bottles = endprice 675.00 € (without counting eventual spare parts for the VPI if needed > ?? maybe a new tube or 2 with the velvets)

    If you go handwash with product, you keep trying some other things all the time. Yes, just check your stock as well as the stock at every house where people handwash there vinyl = 2 botles of 12 €/year + a try of a milty pro 25 € for a change + a try with a record reviginyzer for the most precious records 40 € (2 or 3 bottles) + all the shippingcosts for all thses products in 10 years, etc = endprice approx 500 € to 600 € on 10 years...
    And that is not exagerated, I know what I'm talking about, went there.. Most people who don't use a vacuum machine but care about vinylcleaning are usually trying all sorts of new stuff to wash there vinyl, and new products for handy vinylwash are released all the time (this toppic is a good exemple). It seems to be lower in price at 1 buy, but at the end of the 10-year road I'm not sure it is still more interesting then vacuum mashine... Maybe a little..

    Don't forget, What's your mood if you need to start washing those 20 secondhand records you just received by post? pfff... I know, I did it by hand in the past. Now 20 record is nothing anymore for me. 2 buttons on the VPI, and done..

    Anyway, doing the handstuff can of course also be great, I don't want to get only pro-vacuum here, because trying new stuff, discovering better ways for the handcleaning, etc can also be nice. We always like to try new stuff with the hope it is better then the previous product... That's human! But if I'm really honest, yes the VPI was one of the very best buys since years for me. There are also other brands who make vacuummachines, some lot more expensive, but ok, at the end your records have to be clean, that's it, you don't need a spaceship for that...

  • DEGASPERI over 5 years ago

    ajtonic
    some rainwater and a very smal amength of dishwashing detergent.

    Rainwater!!! WTF!!! Doh! Cmon people this is not the dark ages anymore! Jeebus tits use DISTILLED water. I will take the pepsi challenge with your rainwater anyday

    The point is, to use hot water.

    since when? theres no need for that , room temp. is just fine, in fact too hot will warp the record !!!

    It's still the same, as if you clean up your dishes. But be aware, you can't remove everything with this easy mix, even you use the hot water.

    Yeah no shit>?

    In some cases, you have to use some alcohol.

    NOOOOO!!!! Seriously stop giving out bogus tips please...lol. Alcohol is very harsh and absolutely unnecessary and will cause vinyl polymyers to degrade/break down faster in the long run.

    Use an alcohol free detergent / record cleaner. There are plenty out there now.


    lol, good one
  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    jamiej-80sdisco edited over 5 years ago
    Aftering_at_my_way
    Seriously stop giving out bogus tips please

    Some things I have tried thanks to this group, but won't do again:-

    Baby wipes - leaves a horrible mess and clogs up the grooves
    Warm water - warps records in an instant
    House hold cleaners (bleach, Vanish, dishwasher tablets....) - leaves residue etc which takes ages to clean off again

    Here is my own method of getting a 20-30 year old bargain basement find clean, and removes as safely as possible all those years of dust, fingerprints, fluids (body, animal & otherwise), mould etc ground into the grooves. This is a work in progress with my entire record collection, but those records I have done now sound wonderful. It is a long process (takes up to 72 hours!), but believe me, the wait is worth it.

    THIS WILL NOT WORK IF THE RECORD GROOVES ARE DAMAGED!

    You can remove the early steps if the record is not so bad:

    1) Immerse the record in cold water with some washing up liquid and leave for a few minutes to loosen all the surface grime. Rinse and leave in a dish rack for about 5 - 10 minutes to drain.
    2) With a clean lint free cloth or paper towel liberally wipe methylated spirits in the direction of the grooves on both sides. This is to dissolve any grease, mould from damp, blockages in the grooves etc. Leave to air dry for a few minutes.
    3) Wash the record under cold running water with a gentle washing up fluid to remove the methylated spirits and loosened grime. Rinse very thoroughly under cold running water to make sure all the methylated spirits and detergent are washed off
    4) Wipe the record dry with clean paper towles to soak up most of the excess water. Leave in the open to dry overnight (nowhere where the early morning sun will get to the record and warp it!) - this ensures the grooves and labels are dry.
    5) Apply record re-virginizer - if you want to do both sides, this will take another 20-30 hours.
    6) Whilst waiting, clean sleeve with alcohol wipes for wiping computer screens - this gets rid of much of the ingrained dirt - DO NOT RUB! I have found a great can of stuff for removing labels called LABEL REMOVER http://www.durable-uk.com

    You have probably now lost the will to live, but as you peel off the re-virginizer and put the record on your turntable, be prepared - No more hiss or soft noise, many of the crackles are gone, skips due to build up of who knows what are gone - a pleasurable listening experience.

    It also helps if you up date the cartridge & stylus to a really good quality too, and get the best speakers/headphones possible.

  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    Record Revirginizer, repairs your vinyls.... does it?

    Back to the OP of this thread. For me the stuff really does work - I have now used 7 bottles of it and treated nearly 300 record sides.

    I have found that it is much more successful in removing crackles and pops than a record washing machine. I have bought quite a few records cleaned on a VPI, but they still have some crackles and muffled surface noise. Once I have treated those records with re-virginizer, they do sound better.

    I have found for really bad crackly records, you might need to use re-virginizer two or three times to get a a better result - but with each application the record is noticeably better.

    For me this stuff really works, and I would recommend it to serious vinyl collectors.

    But please don't think it will mend damaged records - it won't!
  • Aftering_at_my_way over 5 years ago

    @ jamiej-80sdisco: I think you quote a different person. I never said "Seriously stop giving out bogus tips please"...

    Anyway, The tip about this re-viginizer could be very interesting. It is worth a try I think for those who want to take their time for some specific records.

    About the VPI: When you can't remove some pops it is worth to retry it a second time. What I do before vacuum it (in the most worned cases) is to let the product work several minutes on the record, so that it has the time to really attack the greasy parts in the grooves. Then I let it turn again with the brush on it and vacuum it afterwards. Works perfect. But I only had to do this a very few times in the past. 99% of the records are great at first wash, and sucked dry immediatly. 1 minute work and you have a shinny new record, ready to play.

    Some record always have some pops caused to the pressing. You feel those parts with your finger, like spits... they are pressed or melted into the plastic. You can't do anything about this, no product or machine will take this of. But that happens only very rarely.

  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    ajtonic
    NOOOOO!!!! Seriously stop giving out bogus tips please


    @Aftering_at_my_way I didn't mean to quote you, I coped that comment from ajtonic, so why it quoted you I don't know...

    Thanks for you comments on the VPI. I think it is up to all serious collectors to find their own ways of cleaning and restoring vinyl - but if we can help each other with methods we have found to work, we should share those tips.
  • Aftering_at_my_way over 5 years ago

    yes my friend, I think so. All tips are always welcome.
  • DEGASPERI over 5 years ago

    so what is better
    Record Revirginizer or Gruv-Glide ?
  • jamiej-80sdisco over 5 years ago

    DEGASPERI
    so what is better

    I like Revirginizer and it works for me. I am not a salesman for Revirginizer, and other users might not like it for whatever reason. Negative comments are also welcome....

    I haven't tried Gruv-Glue, so I can't comment there, but if you try it we'll all be grateful for your comments.
  • DEGASPERI over 5 years ago

    i mean Gruv-Glide not Gruv-Glue lol, but Gruv-Glue sounds also good. ;-)

    it would be good for the community if someone tests the gruv-glide stuff
    oh he did, sounds good
    iLL_WiLL
    Haven't tried the Revirginizer, but Gruv-Glide works amazing. It cleans, protects, de-static and lubricates. makes old, used records sound brand new. and 1 can coats 100-150 records. also get 2 awesome microfiber cleaning pads. def worth the moneyuote
  • DEGASPERI over 5 years ago

    d.p. sorry
  • mrmrb over 5 years ago

    i have this issue with a bunch of second hand vinyls that i get, they are encrusted with layers of dust - like a lot. So i try a dry clean with a carbon fibre brush which just seems to make static. After i have got that surface scum off i hit it with the gruv glide, have tried some other cleaners but the same thing happens...

    After playing through 1 side or sometimes sooner the stylus completely 'gums' up, i have tried it with new needles, old needles, all the same thing...If the record was shitty and dirty before i am thinking these liquid cleaners are just kinda melting the dust and its settling deeper in the grooves? Am i right?

    Its completely pissing me off, i had it so bad you can hardly hear any detail from so much 'gum'

    So i play another disc uncleaned perhaps from the same album and the stylus does not 'gum' the record just looks coated in surface crap.

    Anything i can do? I am sick of cleaning the stylus after every song - i almost think if the record is that shitty, don't clean it as at least i will be able to listen to it.

    starting to think all this crap is just snake oil
  • iLL_WiLL over 5 years ago


    mrmrb
    ill


    a carbon fiber brush is only meant for light dust, not layers and layers of grime. that much dust will be very difficult to remove with just the brush. you probably need to try one of the more intensive cleaning ideas from above, or maybe just need more passes with the gruv-glide. remember, its not clean unless the pad slides smoothly across w/out resistance
  • reallygood over 4 years ago

    tip for anyone cleaning by handwashing - get a box of chopsticks [the round ones not the square one] after washing your record you can put a chopstick thru the center hole and spin the record to get rid of most of the water - then prop it up somewhere warm to dry
  • StevenRuddy over 4 years ago

    Plasterers p.v.a is good for cleaning and is dirt cheap.
  • siman91 over 4 years ago

    4pwclm
    Any one out there tried L'Art Du Son in a vaccum machine


    Yep it's my chosen method of cleaning, ipa and distiller water with drops of fotoflo then vac with loricraft. 2nd clean with LArt Du Son with distiller water and fotoflo. Really cleans the records, restores the sounds and yes removes most pops. Physical or pressing damage can not be repaired.

    S
  • psil0777 over 3 years ago

    Alcohol is good for sleeves you can remove stickers, stamps, markings etc with it . Works with vinyl centres too if theres some markings , stamps and so on..
    Just be careful if using alcohol especially if sleeve is thin , too much alcohol and sleeve is ruined.
  • token007 over 3 years ago

    I like to think that the profit margin on 'revirginizer' is a very high percentage. Some people are getting rich the easy way.
  • Sbaxter123 over 3 years ago

    [quote=token007][/quote]

    Yes they may be making a decent amount of money, and yes it may be expensive. But the way I figure, if it works the way it's meant to then it is worth every dollar spent. I don't think the makers of revirginizer created this stuff for every record, just the special rarities that are too expensive to replace.
  • allenh over 3 years ago

    It was searching for info on record revirginizer that I discovered the PVA glue method. There is a lot of debate about it but I have found it works very well on records that are just plain dirty.
    None of these methods can remove physical problems but can to a lesser or greater degree remove dirt and it is only something I would do to a record once as a last resort, but once you have done it you can clean the record in any more normal way that suits thereafter.
    I have an Okki Nokki and have tried all sorts of solutions both home made and commercial over the years and nothing seems to have the deep cleaning effect of the glue method.

    I read a very good thread on audiokarma and basically followed that and have now glued 20 or so records, so far only spares and slowly working up in value as i got better at it but the results have been tremendous.
    The thread went into some detail about the glues and it seems the quicker drying ones have more elasticity which means they 1. dry quicker obviously and 2. the mask created comes off in one easy peel much like the revirginiser.

    The problem that the revirginizer seems to have overcome compared to the glue method is the static produced, simple enough I have a zerostat and that probelm is also overcome.

    As to the cost well the producers of the revirginizer must have had a fair amount of development time and this costs, also it's a niche market so that cost related to likeley sales is amplified.

    I have plumped for the glue method because it was easy to try (I already had some glue) I liked the DIY aspect ( I am an engineer like moddeling and build my own valve equipment ) and I have read in a couple of places it was a UK discovery 30 or 40 years ago and was or is used by the BBC for archive purposes, if it's good enough for auntie it's good enough for me.

    I have also read a lot about both method's being messy, I have followed the audiokarma method and have had no mess at all. I have a small glue bottle with a thin nozzle to apply the glue, I cut out a spreader from the plastic lid of a chinese takeway box (it's nice and flat and is big enough to cover the spread area but a little thin) I use the Okki Nokki as a means of rotating the record at slow speed to spread the glue I have applied in a decreasing spiral from the outside in.

    As I say the results have been superb, with no mess and minimal cost, that said I had everthing I needed and applying the glue to a slowly rotating record is the key, The audiokarma poster used an old turntable which he had made to run slower.

    Would I use it on a really valuable record? I am not sure yet but the same is true of the revirginiser and as I get better at it I might get braver but either way the cost in supplies will have been minimal.
  • Doc_Smiley over 3 years ago

    No...nothing more needs to be said.
    Though plenty has been said already it seems ;)

    Sand-blasting also works. Gives your vinyl a totally unique sound as well.
  • Doc_Smiley over 3 years ago

    Doc_Smiley edited over 3 years ago
    Aftering_at_my_way
    About the VPI: When you can't remove some pops it is worth to retry it a second time. What I do before vacuum it (in the most worned cases) is to let the product work several minutes on the record, so that it has the time to really attack the greasy parts in the grooves. Then I let it turn again with the brush on it and vacuum it afterwards. Works perfect. But I only had to do this a very few times in the past. 99% of the records are great at first wash, and sucked dry immediatly. 1 minute work and you have a shinny new record, ready to play.


    I own a few vacuum extraction machines; VPI 16.5, VPI Typhoon, Nitty Gritty 2.5Fi-XP, and an Okki Nokki.
    The trick to using these machines correctly depends on a few things. If not used correctly, popping & crackling can be the result, as mentioned by jamiej-80sdisco within this thread ;

    Proper mixture/ratio of solutions if preparing your own.
    Pre-soak time.
    The amount of brushing and extraction time.

    Many will never clean a customers vinyl as well as they clean their own, due to cost of solution, time etc. Just because a seller says that he uses as VPI to clean his records, doesn't necessarily mean he knows how to use it properly. It takes some newbies weeks, months, or longer to hone their cleaning technique.

    So many of the YouTube videos I've seen show people dumping their isopropyl alcohol distilled water solution on the record, only to see it vanish before your eyes within a matter of seconds. The mixture they're using has too high of an alcohol content and causes quick evaporation. This makes pre-soaking impossible. Then, if that isn't bad enough, you'll see them running the vacuum for for only 10 or 15 seconds. On a VPI this is not nearly long enough to ensure all solution and debris is extracted. I'll run mine for a minimum 30 seconds.
    To make matters even worse...you get some morons that cheap out on the distilled water when cleaning for customers, and uses tap water instead. A no-no, as tap water contains minerals and microscopic bits that will embed themselves into the grooves, damage the record, or cause sibilance/noise.

    Correct mixing ratio is crucial. I'll usually use 3 or 4 parts distilled water to 1 part isopropyl. Sometimes I'll add a drop of degreaser, with some camera lens cleaning solution. If somebody says "I have bought quite a few records cleaned on a VPI, but they still have some crackles and muffled surface noise" (jamiej-80sdisco), then the person doing the cleaning hasn't got a clue.
    The VPI and other extraction type machines are the ONLY true way to clean a record. I've been using them nearly 30 years, and have cleaned thousands of LP's. Any other type of cleaning that is spread over the surface (embedding particle into the grooves, D4 Discwasher, etc) without extraction is moronic IMO.

    This "virginizer" product is something I would never dream of using. The list of reasons why I wouldn't use such a silly product would be never ending (several have been mentioned already). Within a few years, I'm sure many will be referring to it as "de-virginizer"
  • teknik over 3 years ago

    Just wanted to chime in on this since I'm getting a vibe that some people think this is a company selling firewater.

    This is made by a single guy (hence the dodgy looking website) while working in the medical research industry for a long, long time and he discovered this solution which was great for transporting medicines and vaccines inside the body. He also discovered it can be used as a record cleaner...takes a clever guy to think of that! He got asked to be on a TV show to explain his invention, and it's the kind of boring but true programs that actually have no corporate agenda behind them.

    To understand what type of chemical the revirginizer is, you can drink it and you'll be fine. It's just a fluid that will seep into the grooves and attach itself to dirt and grime, and can be harmlessly removed once dried.

    While the other methods mentioned here sound great, don't dismiss this suggestion as well. I've tried it and it works for me, plus I'm Australian so they don't cost much here (wish everything else did too!).

    Long live vinyl :)

    Edit: Forgot to mention is that I've met this man and he's a lovely guy, very switched on. I also work at a DJ store so maybe a lil' biased, but informed!
  • simfonik over 2 years ago

    I've used Gruv-Glide for years and recommend it for light cleaning needs.

    I just tried the wood glue method this afternoon and was surprised by the results. It worked like magic. I'm going to try it again and film the process. It took some effort to do it right, but it sounds like the results are similar to the revirginizer mentioned in this thread.
  • webkrawler over 2 years ago

    webkrawler edited over 2 years ago
    For records that already sound and play great but are just dirty and dusty..I use MOBILE FIDELITY - MFSL SUPER RECORD WASH and a microfiber cloth. I spray the cloth until it's saturated and then clean the record WITH THE GROOVE.

    For records that are in not so great shape and you think that a deep cleaning can help, more then what just a record washing can do, I use wood glue. Many times it takes a borderline G/VG record and can make it look and sound VG/VG+.
  • nolazep over 2 years ago

    I'm also a convert to the wood glue method. Watch a few YouTube vids, get yourself a bottle of Titebond II wood glue with the blue label, and get to work. The drying is time-consuming but the results are nothing short of astonishing.
  • tekkno-guy over 2 years ago

    I would love to see a comparison between wood glue, revirginizer, alcohol/water/suffricant solution, and water.

    Would someone care to visit their local church thrift shop and find some filthy records and do a comparison??

    @Doc

    I understand you have been using the VPI and other machines for years and have honed you cleaning skills with these machines...Why does it seem so impossible that some progression can be made in the record cleaning industry?
  • allenh over 2 years ago


    nolazep
    I'm also a convert to the wood glue method. Watch a few YouTube vids, get yourself a bottle of Titebond II wood glue with the blue label, and get to work. The drying is time-consuming but the results are nothing short of astonishing.


    Same here but I can't find Titebond here in the UK. I have found that with the right glue the mask will peel off in one, the wrong glue and it's a pain. It seems that some glues have an added polymer which adds elasticity and this helps with the peel. I have tried a few

    Some cheapo pound shop glues are good some are bad
    Barrettine Trade is very good
    Wurth Trade is bad
    Evo Stick Super Evo bond is bad

    When I say bad, they work but don't come off in one peel which can be very frustrating.
    A friend gave me a gallon of the Wurth and I thought great, tried it and I thought not so great and I am now getting low on the Barrettine so need to get some more.

    I have also found that some glues cause warps in very thin 80's records but that they tend to sort themselves out over time. Also the wood glue method can actually make a scratch worse as it removes the grime from the bottom of the scratch.

    I do have a vacuum machine and use L'art Du Son in it but haven't tried the Revirginizer, on the whole though I have found on records that are very dirty that want a deep clean the wood glue wins, I'm not talking a few finger print's or a bit of dust I'm talking the ones that look brown when they come out of the sleeve there is that much dust on them.

    I use different methods of cleaning on different records depending how dirty they are but all cleaning methods have pro's and cons regardless of method or time spent but I have said before the BBC use this method here in the UK and I can't think of a more credible authority on sound so if it's good enough for them it's good enough for me.
  • allenh over 2 years ago

    For the UK based Dulux decorator centres stock the Barrettine Trade PVA
  • Texasbear over 2 years ago

    I think that the best way to clean vinyl is without a doubt using a vacuum type cleaner. Also, I prefer to use either the VPI solution or MFSL's Record Rinse Wash. If I feel the need to use a water rinse, I use this water I buy at a local supermarket that is called " Real Alkalized Water". It is infused with negative ions and has a ph of 8.0. It is also a 7 stage purified water. The cost is about $3.00 a liter that I apply with a bulb type dispenser and spread with a VPI cleaning brush. I try to do no more than 3 or 4 revolutions per side. The negative ions help with static as well. With these cleaners, a little goes along way. I took me a few weeks to figure out the best method for me. The one thing I never do is wipe my vinyl with any type of cloth. Any other method just seems to me like it embeds the particulate matter into the grooves. I am basically in agreement with Doc_Smiley on this subject.

    Running an album through a vacuum system is something that you have to find the correct balance to get the best sound. I run my vacuum about four revolutions in bright halogen light. You can actually see when it is dry. If you run it too long, it will build up some static. I usually clean my vinyl, old and new, once I receive it and then place the dried vinyl in a MFSL sleeve retaining the original, unless it's just a plain paper sleeve. If that is the case, I trash it. Also, I use the absolute best carbon fiber brush I have found to keep the static down when I play my vinyl. I put the album on my turntable let it run and do a sweep with the brush as it is quite large. The record brush is grounded all the way through from my ground to the metal that holds in the fibers. It's made by a company called Maple Shade and they have some very nice isolation systems as well as turntable stands, but they are proud of their stands and other equipment. The brush is about $35.00 USD. I also use a similar brush made by AcousTech called the BigBrush that basically works the same way with the grounding.

    There are so many snake oils out there that by the time you spend money on each one, you could spend it on a vacuum cleaner. I personally think that the way I clean my vinyl works for me. If something else works better for others and they are happy with the results, then that's great as well. Everyone has a method that works best for their system. If your happy with the sound you are getting that's all that matters, it may ruin your vinyl or cartridge, but those who are serious about vinyl will spend what is needed for the proper cleaning and setup of their stylus and use the proper force. So this means you need a force scale, another piece of equipment for proper vinyl care.

    I generally try to buy new or well cared for vinyl. It's worth the extra price to not have my $1200 cartridge ruined by a $2.00 thrift store find. There are some albums you will never get the pops or crackling out of as the actual grooves have been damaged by the previous owner. Either by crude cleaning or by lack of using a digital force scale. Too much downward force will ruin a cartridge and your vinyl very quickly. Vinyl is an expensive hobby and I have more invested in cleaning devices, brushes, and alignment tools than I do in my turntable with the exception of my cartridge. There is much more to maintaining a vinyl collection than buying a mediocre turntable and a few albums.

    I learned this the hard way buy realizing as I went along that I needed this and that and believe me, it adds up fast. I am not knocking most of the different methods that are being suggested by others in this posting. I am simply stating what I think works best for me. Sure there are methods that are advancements in vinyl cleaning. I just am happy with my method and I have gotten use to my method. I would love a simple method and less purchases of cleaning solutions and replacement tubes for my VPI, but I know friends who have tried the glue method, with mixed results and residue. I would never do this to my vinyl as most of them are either rare, MFSL, or Japanese pressings.
  • rappard over 2 years ago

    ^^^^
    Thanks Texasbear, very informative post.
  • Sbaxter123 over 2 years ago

    Vinyl revirginiser maybe, wood glue? Not a chance. Treat your vinyl with the respect it deserves, stop being a tight-wad and shell out on some of the good stuff. I'm not stying a cleaning method needs to cost a fortune but seriously? Wood glue? Does anyone know the chemical composition of that stuff and it's effect on vinyl over a decent period of time? (eg 25 - 35 years). Alot can be said for tried and true cleaning solutions, the evidence is in the records still sounding great after 50 years. I winder what a wood glue treated record will sound like in 50 years? Let me know in the year 2064, I will wait for your reply.
  • DetroitBootyBass over 2 years ago

    Yes, we know what is in Titebond II - MSDS sheets are readily available online: it's polyvinyl acetate aka PVA. It doesn't adhere to the PVC records, it doesn't leech plasticizers from your vinyl , and this method has been around since 1980-1981. That's over thirty years of real-world testing without a single issue. People realized that Disco Film (and the other similar product at that time), which is a direct relative of the newest Record Revirginizer, is essentially the same thing as PVA wood glue... but for only a fraction of the cost.

    The cost is a big thing. A bottle of the Revirginizer costs roughly $75 USD and it only treats about 14-15 records. A gallon of Titebond II costs less than $20 USD and treats about 70 records. Plus, people can buy PVA wood glue anywhere and the Revirginizer stuff has to be shipped from Australia.

    As for 2064, I will be 90 years old - I'm not sure if my personal experiences will be enough to change an Australian citizen's mind about the overpriced nature of an Australian company's product.
  • allenh over 2 years ago


    Sbaxter123
    Vinyl revirginiser maybe, wood glue? Not a chance. Treat your vinyl with the respect it deserves, stop being a tight-wad and shell out on some of the good stuff. I'm not stying a cleaning method needs to cost a fortune but seriously? Wood glue? Does anyone know the chemical composition of that stuff and it's effect on vinyl over a decent period of time? (eg 25 - 35 years). Alot can be said for tried and true cleaning solutions, the evidence is in the records still sounding great after 50 years. I winder what a wood glue treated record will sound like in 50 years? Let me know in the year 2064, I will wait for your reply.


    It might be better if you did a little research, it's not hard with the internet nowadays.

    There are one or two sites that go into detail about the chemical composition of PVA and vinyl and why it works.

    The BBC archive have been using this method for decades with no ill effects and I very much doubt there is an organisation in the world more respected for sound quality so I will trust their judgement on this one.
    From what I gather they have been doing it for far longer than the early 80's so if you want to know what a wood glue treated record sounds like after many years ask them.

    When I first heard about this method I thought it was April the 1st but intrigued I did some research and then gave it a go with very good results.

    Cost is obviously a factor as stated above and I don't doubt revirginiser works but has it been tested for as long and as extensively as wood glue?
  • 78s over 2 years ago

    once something isn't a virgin, you can't get that back, regardless of yuppie marketing practices and "products".

    ex virgin? born again virgin?
    something is either virgin, or it isn't.

    that is like Mint+

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