• regenerativemusic 5 months ago

    I recently saw a 78 3 record set by a great violinist and noticed it had been released also on 33 lp. The 78 set was listed at around $40 to $80. Being a long time book dealer I know that prices listed online are often pie in the sky and will not be realized in sales. Is this the case today for 78 sets that are obtainable elsewhere? Does a large group actually prefer to play something on 78s?
  • NotPresentNowPresent 4 months ago

    Large, probably not. There are though undoubetly people who get the 78s for novelty reasons i.e. Indian 78s of Beatles singles because reasons.
  • irionman 4 months ago

    78s have a small niche market. You'd be surprised how often they sell for outrageous prices.
  • Record-City 4 months ago

    Don't discount the vintage jukebox market. Have sold dozens of "common" tunes on 78 to such.
  • Sombunya 4 months ago

    I know the title of this thread is "Do People Buy 78s They Can Get on 33s?" and it seems just about anything on 78 rpm can be found reissued. Generally speaking, pre-war Blues 78's are the most historically important and therefore the most valuable, followed by 1950's RnB 45's, 1960's Garage/Psych and then early metal. Just my opinion, worth what you paid for it.

    There are many items that were unknown (and many waiting to be turned up) that were on 78 rpm only. Check out John Tefteller's website. Many interesting stories there.
  • Sombunya 4 months ago

    Record-City
    Don't discount the vintage jukebox market. Have sold dozens of "common" tunes on 78 to such.


    For a while there were companies pressing 78's specifically for this market.
  • andrew.lisowski.1 4 months ago

    The OP mentioned a 78 by a violinist. There is a niche market of collectors of classical and opera recordings who like to play original 78s on vintage equipment. Others like to make their own digital transfers using modern pitch-correctable equipment. A small interest group, but it is there.
  • devin306 4 months ago

    Sombunya
    There are many items that were unknown (and many waiting to be turned up) that were on 78 rpm only. Check out John Tefteller's website. Many interesting stories there.


    I'd also reccomend Roy's Record Room on CKUA for a great place to hear 78s you'll never hear otherwise.. he has one of the largest colkections in North America.. http://www.ckua.com/category/rrr
  • regenerativemusic 4 months ago

    For example, I saw two 78 binders of Nelson Eddy records in vg condition, about 12. They were less than $5. I am not sure if this would be a good deal. I know shipping 78s is more difficult than other records.
  • jazzbeets 4 months ago

    jazzbeets edited 4 months ago
    The answer is yes, as with all records, distinct pressings on different formats have a value to collectors. Many titles on 78 though, particularly albums, have little to no demand. I recently obtained a nice assortment of black gospel 78's. There is a market for them too. I listed one on ebay yesterday with a starting price of 200, the only other example on popsike by this particular group had fetched 180 with one bid so I think I priced it right. Study popsike and while there is no guarantee that you are getting typical results it definitely helps to determine values.
  • ThomasP64 4 months ago

    regenerativemusic
    Does a large group actually prefer to play something on 78s?

    There are times when it's worth having both. Some 78's sound surprisingly good. And even if you have Birth Of The Cool, for example, on vinyl or CD, it's fun to have an original 78 by the Miles Davis Nonet in your collection.
    jazzbeets
    Many titles on 78 though, particularly albums, have little to no demand.


    I would think it would depend on the album. A complete album which issues material for the first time, as opposed to compiling earlier 78s, may be worth something. This 78 RPM album from Victor, Bunk Johnson And His New Orleans Band - Hot Jazz, is the first issue of 8 side by Bunk Johnson, sounds good, and includes a tipped-in booklet with five pages of liner notes and session photographs. So it is nice to have, even if you have the material on the Dawn Club LP Bunk Johnson In New York 1945, with extremely minimal notes. Esquire's All American Hot Jazz, Volume 2 was issued with new recordings by Esquire's poll winner's (Benny Goodman had left Victor, so his side is a reissue; the others are new). Check the prices on the two copies for sale at Discogs. According to Popsike, in 2016 a copy sold for $50 with a significantly damaged binder.

    Also, some really interesting rarities are available on 78's. "Miff" Mole* - Nick's Presents His Dixieland Jazz Band, for example, was produced in the 1940's to be sold at the nightclub Nick's in New York. I don't know that this album made it to LP.
  • catchthebeat76 4 months ago

    Ragtime/Big Band 78's are generally worth about 13 cents each.
  • rinkrat 4 months ago

    Some people want the way they remember listening to it. Like all of the people who prefer records over CD's.
  • Ktrump5 4 months ago

    I still listen to my 78s from time to time... there is something enchanting about the sound and feel of hearing the "original." Something about it transports me back in time, sometimes over 100 years ago! I have several Edison Diamond Discs which I have had trouble playing/listening to because of their fine grooves (Edison used diamond styli).
    I am not a huge fan of listening to an 'album' in 78 format because of the constant need to flip records (which is even more annoying with auto-coupled records which are set up something like Side 1 & 6, Side 2 & 5, Side 3 & 4. I don't understand how these records didn't break on automatic changers). With classical recordings, this is especially annoying. Some of the compositions were truncated, edited, or spread across several sides/records.
    There are some exceptions.... one of my favorites that I bought a while ago and recently submitted on here was
    Various - The Jazz Scene
    Limited, hand-numbered edition of 5,000. Hand-signed/numbered by Norman Granz on title page. Features awesome full-size pictures of many famous jazz giants of the 30's and 40's. Such a cool and unique release, which has been issued on LP and CD; but those aren't signed by Norman Granz and don't have huge, high-quality black & whites!
    45rpm box sets seemed to be another transition medium, and are equally as annoying with flipping the sides.
    Freddy Gardner - Freddy Gardner
  • ThomasP64 4 months ago

    ThomasP64 edited 4 months ago
    catchthebeat76
    Ragtime/Big Band 78's are generally worth about 13 cents each.

    Depends. What about this Blue Note album:
    Art Hodes' Hot Five - Hot Jazz At Blue Note
    I found three copies that sold for $55 to $105, according to Popsike. Jazz records from major artists and important jazz labels may be worth something.
    rinkrat
    Some people want the way they remember listening to it.
    I'm not that old. I like having a record by Charlie Parker or Miles Davis on 78 for the same reason I like having a first edition of a book. The text may be the same as a mass-market paperback, but the first edition is a piece of history in a way the paperback will never be.
    Ktrump5
    Such a cool and unique release, which has been issued on LP and CD; but those aren't signed by Norman Granz and don't have huge, high-quality black & whites!
    I understand completely.

    This Victor Showpiece Duke Ellington - Black Brown And Beige (A Duke Ellington Tone Parallel To The American Negro) is a favorite of mine. Paper covers instead of board covers, but nicely designed.

    Ktrump5
    I am not a huge fan of listening to an 'album' in 78 format
    In my experience, a lot of the 78s I get in albums sound better than individual records.

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