• jumpinfrom6to6 over 5 years ago

    Anyone think that shrink wrapping a record and it running through a hot shrink wrap machine is a good idea? I lived in Europe, in the UK and back then they were not shrink wrapped, and never had an issue with a warped record until I moved to the US,and I noticed more records that were shrink wrapped ,Brand New ,had warps.
    Records from other countries too that were 'new' had warps and they were shrink wrapped.So in my experience New Records that didn't' have shrink on 99% of the time we're flat.
    We as consumers do not have to pay for faulty items that are purchased so I always return a warped record,so then hopefully companies might try and put an end to it,and the issue will be investigated more closely.
  • mjb over 5 years ago

    I used a shrink wrap "machine" on boxed goods many years ago. It's not really a machine, more like just a roll of 2-ply plastic that you slip the item into, and an arm that pinches off and melts the edges so you now have the item in a loose, clear rectangular bag of sorts. Then you blow hot air on it with a hairdryer. The plastic shrinks really fast and the heat has no time to reach the innards of the item you are wrapping.

    However there is a bit of trick to getting just the right amount of plastic around the item before you apply the heat. Too much and you get thick edge seams. Too little and it's too tight, or it seems just right but you actually didn't shrink it enough and then it shrinks a little more the next time it gets warm (say, sitting in a box on the back of a delivery truck in mid-summer). Also the shrink wrap may have been put on an already opened or never-wrapped record by an unethical dealer, and they can make those mistakes.

    Record manufacturers did not want returns nor to waste money so they were going to make it be perfect every time... in theory. Reality is that sometimes they got it right and sometimes a little too tight. They also sometimes skimped on the stiffness of the sleeve. We have all seen sealed records which were warped and many which were not. It's a roll of the dice.

    As for whether wrapping at all is a good idea, it is a tradeoff. If the sleeve can handle it and the wrap is not too tight, it's cheap protection and keeps the record inside "mint" (in theory), so why not. The risks are as described above. You are right to return a warped record. If someone didn't do shrink wrap right, they shouldn't do it at all.
  • hymns over 5 years ago

    Remove the shrinkwrap and put the sleeved record in a polybag.
    http://www.bagsunlimited.com/category/90/lp-poly-sleeves
  • jumpinfrom6to6 over 5 years ago

    Maybe they could shrink wrap them less tightly,some of them are sitting in shelves in record stores for a long time with tight shrink wrap on,just not a good idea especially with some thin cardboard sleeves.
  • jumpinfrom6to6 over 4 years ago

    hymns
    Remove the shrinkwrap and put the sleeved record in a polybag.
    http://www.bagsunlimited.com/category/90/lp-poly-sleeves


    Yes I agree,but I am asking if it is a good idea for the factory to shrink wrap them.
  • AskeladdenBlack over 4 years ago

    I personally agree that factory shrink wrapping is a bad idea. I fear that different cardboard can expand inside the wrap and it then distorts the whole package opening up pockets for air to sit and then the slightest bit of heat will warp the vinyl inside what is now a kinda hot house.
    I could be over thinking it though.
  • webkrawler over 4 years ago

    I see no reason why you have to remove the shrink wrap. I keep them on my covers unless it's a gatefold since the shrink wrap keeps you from opening it up. Otherwise, I carefully slit the shrink wrap and remove the record. I then place the cover, with the shrink wrap, in a polly bag. And put the record in a new polyethylene sleeves and slide them behind the cover.
  • jumpinfrom6to6 over 4 years ago

    webkrawler
    I see no reason why you have to remove the shrink wrap. I keep them on my covers unless it's a gatefold since the shrink wrap keeps you from opening it up. Otherwise, I carefully slit the shrink wrap and remove the record. I then place the cover, with the shrink wrap, in a polly bag. And put the record in a new polyethylene sleeves and slide them behind the cover.


    Yes but is necessary to shrink wrap them in the first place in the factory?Im in favor of them putting more loose shrink wrap on. In Europe they do not shrink wrap mostly.
  • noirday over 4 years ago

    many shrinks tends to WARP!!!!!!!!! the jackets over time.
    I SAY many! because not all, I have 70s records still sealed perfect and some others totally warp.
    Overall: AVOID shrink on records.
  • jumpinfrom6to6 over 4 years ago

    When I lived in the UK no records were shrinkwrapped and I never had a warped record.
  • Sandervdd over 4 years ago

    It's called shrink wrap, and this means that over time it will keep on shrinking. So opening the sleeve carefully to leave the shrink wrap on will eventually damage your sleeves and potentially your records. Always take the shrink wrap off completely.
  • jumpinfrom6to6 over 4 years ago

    Sandervdd
    It's called shrink wrap, and this means that over time it will keep on shrinking. So opening the sleeve carefully to leave the shrink wrap on will eventually damage your sleeves and potentially your records. Always take the shrink wrap off completely.


    Why shrink wrap in the first place though,I mean in the factory.In Europe,UK most companies don't.
  • jumpinfrom6to6 over 4 years ago

    Sandervdd
    It's called shrink wrap, and this means that over time it will keep on shrinking. So opening the sleeve carefully to leave the shrink wrap on will eventually damage your sleeves and potentially your records. Always take the shrink wrap off completely.


    Why shrink wrap in the first place though,I mean in the factory.In Europe,UK most companies don't.
  • webkrawler over 4 years ago

    webkrawler edited over 4 years ago
    jumpinfrom6to6


    Why shrink wrap in the first place though,I mean in the factory.In Europe,UK most companies don't.


    The answer to your question is warm fuzzies. When we spend money on something that we perceive as new and pristine, we want the feeling that is exactly what we are getting. When it's shrink wrapped, we expect that we are the first set of human hands to touch whatever is inside since it was produced in the factory.

    Shrink wrapping is not something a lot of people can do in their homes. So, if someone says "I have this new record" and we see shrink wrap on it that's intact, we have very little suspicion that the record is not new.

    And I don't know about you..but I get a few goose bumps anytime I take a record home from the store
    and I am holding it at home with the shrink wrap on it. I take a few moments to inspect the cover,
    realize this will be the only time someone will be opening this record new.

    I recall visiting France in the 1980's and I went to a mall and I bought a poster and it came rolled up in
    shrink wrap, so I know shrink wrap does exist in Europe. Why records would not be shrink wrapped
    I do not know.

    Oh, it also keeps dust out of the cover adding an extra layer of protection.
  • Abbey_Road_1970 about 1 year ago

    After I returned from London, I co-founded Abbey Road Records Distribution in California in the 70's. At the time most of the British imports coming into the USA were polybagged and not shrink wrapped. The imports were made of a less durable cardboard cover, unlike the USA market. Even if we chose to remove the polybag and have them shrink wrapped, they would bend and not hold up.

    For the albums we manufactured in the valley, we chose the much more durable cardboard covers of the day, and they stood up fine with the commercial shrink-wrapping equipment tunnels we used. A shrink-wrap tunnel with conveyor belts has many settings which prevent the album from being warped by heat. We also used a time-tested plastic that did not require as much heat to shrink, unlike other thicker gauge wraps. In the end, we could see the immediate output and the commercial tunnels maintained a perfect heat and perfect speed.

    As for the record stores getting warped albums out of the box, we had the ability to track where the problem occurred, which was typically on the delivery trucks with little to no temperature controls.

    Record stores who sold a warped album to a customer would typically exchange it for another new album, but would first open the new one so the customer could see it was not warped. The store can return any and all of the albums each month if within ten percent of their purchases. If they bought 100 albums, they could return 10 records. Prior to the 70s, it was 100% return privileges until stores began buying used albums for 50 cents and returning them for full credit at a higher amount.

    My sense on shrink wrap today in 2021, there is hardly any risk to the customer of getting a warped album with a strong cover wrapped and with the use of the latest wraps that need less heat and less restraint over the cardboard.

    If you have a personal collection of vinyl's and you want to protect them long term, then invest in a 12"-16" wide home impulse sealer and wrap roll for under $95. You can use the same device for Blu-ray and DVD and Music too.

    Cheers
  • FatElvisRecords about 1 year ago

    I run a small record label. When I release an LP, I opt for the shrinkwrap from the pressing plant. Shrinkwrap or Polybags (the more expensive option) are suggested to keep the jackets from rubbing against each other during shipment. There is a purpose behind the shrinkwrap.
  • 8892sales about 1 year ago

    As long as the shrinkwrap isn't so tight that it promotes warping of the contents, then shrinkwrap does have a positive purpose.
  • fly_free about 1 year ago

    fly_free edited about 1 year ago
    as stated above 2yrs ago, some shrink wrap keeps on shrinking which CAN lead to warped vinyl and covers over time.
    It might be no harm if it is just a relatively short time a record coming in shrinkwrap from the factory, into the shop, till its sold and probably unpacked.
    But imagine a case where a record is kept sealed as mint for several years, be it for keeping it as new & sealed in collection or for selling at a later point, just to find out too late that it was unfortunatly being wrapped in shrinkwrap that keeps on shrinking...
    as someone stated in a vinyl hospital threat from his own experience:

    solvang23
    I have seen some recent examples of excessively tight shrink wrapping where the record was hideously warped. I fixed that one but it took 40 hours or 10 cycles. When the record was taken out of the jacket, the tight shrink wrap made it fold up in the shape of a bowl. Crazy! That record (EU GZ Media pressing) was shipped like that. U.S. records back in the day that had remained sealed in shrink wrapping beyond a certain time were usually warped to some degree, in my experience.
  • bonedagger about 1 year ago

    The heat from the warming unit on a vinyl shrinkwrap line isn't enough to warp a record in the time they pass through. The polymer wrap is (or should be) very thin, and is frame-sealed and shrunk down very quickly.

    Shrinkwrap keeps each unit's contents static in transit and helps prevent ringwear, seams and edges splitting, plus it keeps everything inside clean and secure for retail. I'm a manufacture broker and always recommend it where it's viable.

    Warping is something that usually happens from a duff pressing machine and/or records being packed before they've been sufficiently cooled. They can also often warp in transit under certain conditions; trucking across Australia in the peak of summer, for example. Shrinkwrap plastic isn't strong enough to warp cold vinyl alone. If you get a warped record in tight wrap, the warping has caused the latter.
  • fly_free about 1 year ago

    bonedagger
    Shrinkwrap plastic isn't strong enough to warp cold vinyl alone


    every 100 gram wibble-wobble pressing will tell you otherwise, i'm afraid.
  • bonedagger about 1 year ago

    fly_free

    every 100 gram wibble-wobble pressing will tell you otherwise, i'm afraid.


    No, it won't tell me that. It may infer that you've some warped lightweight 12" pressings, perhaps, but nowt else!

Log In You must be logged in to post.