• wilky77 over 2 years ago

    I've loved music from the moment I became aware of its existence. If it moves me in some way then I like it. I finally got to a place in my life where I'm not moving around and decided to start buying and listening to vinyl. Buying my favorite and in my opinion complete albums. Ones you can listen to all the way through. Mostly because of the cost of vinyl today. So my curiosity is this, what is the best for vinyl? I listen on vinyl because I like the ritual and to escape the digitally compressed world. On well mastered and pressed vinyl I like the sound, I can hear and see the space between all the instruments. It got me thinking about what sounds best on vinyl. With mastering and pressing aside. Jazz, because of the horns and masterful drumming? An album with a good mix of guitars and electronic tracks like the Generationals? Albums from the Stax catalogue with those quick short horn burst and snare pops? Or acoustic based albums sprinkled with soundscapes? Whats best on vinyl? Is electronic music better for vinyl because its digital? Does vinyl hold up to the resonance of a lot of horns going at once? Is rap good on vinyl, does it handle the vocal flow, various overdubs and heavy bass?
  • KayX over 2 years ago

    For me it's everything with good bass. I mean not only bass music but also things from rock, pop and this hifi stuff with direct metal mastering. I love to listen to the different bass sounds in a track.
    I don't like classic because most frequencies are in mid-range of hearing...that's very exhausting and not really exciting for me.
  • emptycyb1 over 2 years ago

    wilky77
    Is electronic music better for vinyl because its digital?


    ???

    Electronic music isn't more digital than any pop music of the past 25 years...
  • wilky77 over 2 years ago

    Yes. I agree with you about classical. I really like songs on vinyl where there's these different little parts. Like not just the how ever many instruments straight through.
  • fcorne about 1 year ago

    I think "warm" music generally benefits from vinyl the most; so soul, R&B but also live recordings and acoustic. Classical undoubtedly too but I'm not into that. Maybe then 78rpm's are even superb ;)
    I also like metal which I think doesn't greatly benefit from being on vinyl, but it's cool :)
  • DexterMiller 11 days ago

    Rock in stereo tends to suffer the worst from vinyl's technical limitations: the bass gets too thinned-out and the dynamic extremes have to have their eq limited for the grooves-per-inch factor to even fit within a playing side. The resultant sound then loses a lot of its "impact" in the process...the reason, for example, classic Rock is preferred in mono.

    However, listening to often the same material on a different (vintage) analog format: a stereo master which was NOT the one screwed with to fit the record version *will* sound fuller-bodied almost immediately and, even with gimmicky '60s stereo mixing, the wide panning effect is less noticeable when there is a playback format reproducing what vinyl couldn't be engineered to do (most notably: the format of 1/4" magnetic tape running at a fast speed).
  • nickster66 11 days ago

    I think any/all genres have the potential to sound fantastic on vinyl, providing that the "powers that be" took the time to master it for analog format.
  • rugogs 11 days ago

    nickster66
    I think any/all genres have the potential to sound fantastic on vinyl, providing that the "powers that be" took the time to master it for analog format.


    Yes. Unless you're Mike Oldfield and have a beef with your record company. ;-)
  • King.of.Pain 11 days ago

    Death and Black Metal. It really sounds different.
    For example,I own Sentenced " North from here" both in vinyl and cd. Cd is spectacular...but vinyl....above and beyond. Speaking of course of physical items played in a real hi-fi stereo.
  • jmcipale 9 days ago

    If you REALLY want to hear well mastered vinyl, find any of the CTI catalog, Art Blakey from the 50/60's, Miles Davis on Columbis or ANY of the Capital catalog. Even many mono recordings from the 50s had incredible spacing and an amazing soundstage.

    Truyh be told, stereo is a psycho-acoustical trick. ALL sounds in nature are mono sounds. We HEAR stereoscopically in order to locate a sound. If you were to listen, i mean LISTEN to a well recorded mono recording, you would hear not only stereoscopic subtleties, but a depth/soundstage that you would never expect.
  • nickster66 9 days ago

    jmcipale
    If you REALLY want to hear well mastered vinyl, find any of the CTI catalog


    Agreed! Creed Taylor is a favorite of mine. That man was prodigious, and had a great ear for production.
    Here's my ongoing list of artists produced by Creed Taylor -
    https://www.discogs.com/lists/Produced-byCreed-Taylor/214684

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