• DeadwaxDevil 2 months ago

    Opinion poll: All things being equal, do you prefer vintage or brand new unopened vinyl? What if the new pressing is a remaster? 180 gram? repressing? Ultra cool deluxe super special edition? What makes your preference (old/new/first pressing/etc) special to you?
  • avantgarde32 2 months ago

    I dont mind if it's new, the problem is lots of "new" reissues are sourced from crappy digital media and not mastered properly for vinyl format. I only buy new LPs from professional trustworthy labels who know what they're doing and care about the quality-where there's info on the process and mastering engineers, etc. Fortunately labels are progressively getting better at that and offering quality products.

    P.S. Some new vinyl is ok to be hybrid (even if it's sourced from high res files, if the mastering, cutting process is good, then it's good).
  • JimLahey 2 months ago

    Whatever sounds the best bruh
  • freddiebass 2 months ago

    freddiebass edited 2 months ago
    i found a lot of new vinyl is full of crackles and pops and to be honest does my head in,all i want is quiet pressings,a few back to black pressings are full of surface noise,you think i'll get a new repress and can leave it at that then you put it on the turntable and its full of surface noise it's awful then you have to start looking at buying older versions of the album and they can sound infinitely better than the new one
  • emptycyb1 2 months ago

    180/220g will never make a pressing sound better, or worse, it has zero impact, since the groove is cut anywhere between 100 and 50 micro millimeter deep, which is good enough for quality 120g pressing as well (140 is the standard). The only possible advantage of 180g, is that it will tend to be less subjected to warping. But extreme conditions will affect it anyways.
  • betonen 2 months ago

    Could you please add some companies, where I could find high quality rereleases or releases. Is there any difference between original 1990 releases and younger rereleases?
  • vinylforlunch 2 months ago

    usually original vinyl (if youcan find in EX or NM condition) is the best option for most oldies, new pressings variable !
  • emptycyb1 2 months ago

    You do all realize, that older original lackluster pressings also exist, do you? These questions all need a case by case answer, not an over-generalization that doesn't help anyone.
  • lunarr about 1 month ago

    You can't beat middle-aged vinyl. It's a great time to be a record.
  • deanbeddall about 1 month ago

    deanbeddall edited about 1 month ago
    Thinking vinyl got better as soon as it went to stereo. consumers needed to wait until 1958 for recordings with stereo sound to become widely available for the home. The year I was born lol. Rock n roll era, elvis, more money after 2 World wars & more expendable cash. Leading to Pop short for popular for those that weren't aware. It all had its time with different generations. Luckily us oldies now have more choice as I still buy new music, (2 days ago Gregory Porters, All Rise) triple album signed by Gregory my pal in blue vinyl my only coloured album to date. So still interested even today. P. S. He signed loads who pre-ordered sigh.
  • AbortusSurviver 18 days ago

    Don't care.. I love the exitmen of putting it on and hearing it thrue and true
  • thirdsystem 17 days ago

    I like both, providing it's quality, Lets face it both can vary considerably.

    Have to say though I am getting sick and tired returning new stuff. I would estimate I have had to take back about 20 % of new as opposed to about 5% of second hand stuff. Obviously you can check out 2nd hand in the shop which makes a big difference.

    New pressings recently , bowled Stones - Goats Head, bowled Floyd - Saucerful of Secrets, vinyl polyps on Judas Priest - Stained Class, warped Blackfield, warped Vangelis, etc etc. That does not include the ones I have kept despite slight warping. Reaching the stage I will be buying mainly second hand except for really vital stuff.
  • lunarr 14 days ago

    Do you mean 'Bowed"?!....because if you do--how did they play?...
  • adisonrain 14 days ago

    That is a broad but good question. I've come to realize that I want to limit my collection to maybe 1000, at the most and I'm just over the 300 mark now. I try to research each record I want to buy but I'd always rather have a good early pressing if that was the way to go. Sometimes you just can't find what you want in the condition you want for certain bands at a good price. And although I wish every new record was made from the master tapes and totally analog, I understand that it's no longer possible so I hope for good digital stuff. Digital is not as bad as one thinks and if done right, I can't tell the difference. One of the best records I have is Donald Fagen's "Night Fly", it was one of the earliest digital records and it sounds superb. I've been on a quest to collect all 30 of the Rolling Stones studio albums and it has been a journey. All of there stuff up to Aftermath really needs to be mono to get decent, and to me, listenable vinyl. Mono Stones (as well as the Beatles) vinyl in -NM shape can be very expensive. Enter the 2016 mono box set, a box set done right and really, up to that there is only a few reissues here and there by them in mono that sounds worthy. But a lot of records now a days are poorly prepared for vinyl, they are "brick walled", poorly pressed by manufactures that don't have experienced labor, or don't care and the bottom line is all that matters. That's where research comes in and we have this wonderful thing called Discogs and the internet to help us find what we are looking for. Some people don't care or don't have the system that would make it matter, and that's OK too. Whatever works for you. So, bottom line for me is I buy both. One thing I really appreciate is some of these older bands are going to great lengths to re-issue there vinyl and make it sound good. Bands like Rush, Pink Floyd, Tom Petty, The Stones, to name a few. If it sounds good to you, that's all that matters!
  • adisonrain 14 days ago

    emptycyb1
    180/220g will never make a pressing sound better, or worse, it has zero impact, since the groove is cut anywhere between 100 and 50 micro millimeter deep, which is good enough for quality 120g pressing as well (140 is the standard). The only possible advantage of 180g, is that it will tend to be less subjected to warping. But extreme conditions will affect it anyways.


    Agreed. Not only that, a big thick record will cause early ring wear and no one wants that!
  • adisonrain 14 days ago

    adisonrain edited 14 days ago
    deanbeddall
    Thinking vinyl got better as soon as it went to stereo. consumers needed to wait until 1958 for recordings with stereo sound to become widely available for the home. The year I was born lol. Rock n roll era, elvis, more money after 2 World wars & more expendable cash. Leading to Pop short for popular for those that weren't aware. It all had its time with different generations. Luckily us oldies now have more choice as I still buy new music, (2 days ago Gregory Porters, All Rise) triple album signed by Gregory my pal in blue vinyl my only coloured album to date. So still interested even today. P. S. He signed loads who pre-ordered sigh.


    Actually, before stereo, mono recordings when done right are very good recordings. I have many old jazz records where the sound engineers and producers went to great lengths to get high fidelity. Stereo was in it's infant form in the early 60's and it was drums and bass on the right, vocals and guitars on the left. Just listen to early Beatles. The Stereo was not mixed well and they didn't have 8 or 16 track recorders. The Beatles, Stones and all the good jazz groups were much more concerned with good mono sound than they were with stereo.Then we have "electronically processed stereo" or fake stereo, which was taking good well mixed mono recordings and making them sound like stereo, although they did not. The mucked up plenty of good mono recordings (like the Stones) and re-issued them in the "electronically processed stereo" to get more sales. I avoid those like the plague. Get a good mono recording of Dave Brubeck's "Time Out" on a good turntable with a good cart and stylus and you'll see what I mean. That album was the first mono record I'd heard that was really good. So good that I didn't know it was mono until I entered it into Discogs, only then I found out it was mono. Then I put it on and really listened to it, and sure enough, it was. When I heard mono done right, it opened up a whole new world for me. Really, it blew me away.
  • thirdsystem 12 days ago

    lunarr
    Do you mean 'Bowed"?!....because if you do--how did they play?...


    "Bowled" vinyl. Warped in a shape like a bowl. ie on one side the central label section is raised on the platter, turn it over and the outside edge is raised.

    As to how they play most are probably ok however I'm not paying £25 ($32 ) or more for new vinyl that's "bowled" . I suspect it is caused by shrinkwrap that is too tight. That is what I have personally noticed. There are other causes though like storage/temperature and manufacturing issues.

    Here's some info ...

    https://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/how-do-you-repair-bowled-vinyl.131535/
  • Huub123 10 days ago

    Indeed, 180 gram doesn’t make a record sound better, it only makes it more expensive. Having said that, there are contemporary re-releases that sound better than the original, and also new releases that sound just fantastic, and that set new standards. But when In look at my collection I don’t see a trend there. I notice theres a lot of lousy mastering, surface noise, and cracks and pops with brand new vinyl. If a vintage copy has a decent reputation, then that’s what I prefer to get.
  • bruuce73 10 days ago

    Really tired from new pressings.. it seems that as we move on in technology, quality get much worse.. Huge disappointments in too many records bought recently including Water's Us + Them. If I have the luxury to buy only original presses only I would do it without hesitation.
    You nowadays pay premium numbers and receive mostly amateurish pressings that does not stand to the artists reputation.
    The day CD's took over, was the day that pressings became mostly sourced from digital.
  • tonythebeat 1 day ago

    I prefer original vinyl (especially for lp before 90's) but can be complicated to find in a good state and that play well. so i have to buy new vinyl , and sometimes the repress are not so good.
    it depends on label. if somenone can advice some good label can be good,
    Usually i buy new lp form sudazed mov, universal light in the attic etcetc

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