• rtscollectables over 6 years ago

    Are cd's worth selling any more or are they a dead media, and if they are wheres best to sell them i did a little research, and tried on ebay and they didnt sell leaving me with some hefty fee's did intialy list a few on here no luck same went on play, as for amazon people seem to sell cd's for 1p and i cant see the point in that. So was just wandering if now the time to sell them to one of them online companies for 30p each or do people still believe there is a market for them and there still worth selling if so wheres best?
  • Jayfive over 6 years ago

    rtscollectables
    Are cd's worth selling any more or are they a dead media,


    It depends on what the CDs are. A lot of easy to get stuff goes for buttons but rare/collectable stuff fetches big money.

    rtscollectables
    as for amazon people seem to sell cd's for 1p and i cant see the point in that


    Most obviously - list them on discogs with no outlay until they sell :)

    Or get an Pro Merchant account on amazon, if you reckon you could sell more than 25 items per month then it would be worthwhile.

    Alternatively get rid of all you low price stuff here:
    http://www.musicmagpie.co.uk/
  • ROBDOLPHIN66 over 6 years ago


    rtscollectables
    are they a dead media


    I hope not!!
  • Davidsen over 6 years ago

    The CD format is becoming the vinyl of the 1990s... It is not only on Discogs, it also holds for new CD on Amazon for instance.

    I had the same experience as you: I have not sold a single cd on ebay. Discogs used to be good, but there has been a major turn this year. Even "rare" CD no longer sell for high prices. You can see it if you check some rare stuff regularly, it doesn't sell. Plus, the sound quality of "rarer" CD is usually awful and people are almost better of downloading them on the net. Let alone the discogers who lie on the condition of their rare CD - I got one sold "near mint", which skips and of which the cover is full of dirt.

    As CD sales fall, music does not interest a lot of talented artists anymore, which reinforces the drop in sales. Plus, the music industry no longer invests in CD: they keep selling old, non remastered stuff (rare are the CD who have 24-bit remastering) and sign marketable but untalented artists.
  • dansauk over 6 years ago

    You can take CD's down to the local "Cash Generators" shop. They will pay a fixed amount per CD (used to be between £0.70 and £1.00 last year, but not sure now..)
  • dansauk over 6 years ago

    Oops.. double post...
  • rtscollectables over 6 years ago

    I guess for the fee's involved i may as well have them sat on here and maybe get a few sales along the way makes no difference whether there sat here and not selling or sitting in there boxes. But it does seem a shame there is a downward spiral of the cd thou but yea i can see how it happened to vinyl and its a natural course of action for the cd hope there are still enogh demand out there to keep buying them thou
  • Dads_Vinyl over 6 years ago

    Davidsen
    The CD format is becoming the vinyl of the 1990s...


    I hope not!!!!, u cannot replace vinyl! [scary]

    78's, 45's, lp, ep's what ever CD's cant replace these......

    i know u said, format.. but................. vinyl is here forever!
  • infamous31 over 6 years ago

    For the most part, yeah, CDs are worthless. But you're talking about over a decade of music where CDs were the only physical format...so it's ridiculous to think that the rare ones won't be worth money in the future. As the global economy rebounds (if it ever does), I expect collectible CDs to continue to garner interest.
  • cannymusic over 6 years ago

    Collectable CDs maybe, but run of the mill CDs, ex-chart, etc. forget them, bin them. I have a few unusual (non-chart_ CDs listed, but if lucky sell one or two every six months for £3-4.
  • Axefield over 6 years ago

    I think only the CD's that can't be found as download somewhere have any chance of being sold online. I don't even bother anymore, when I have CD's to spare I add them as freebies to vinyl buyers. Same for DVD's.
  • little_alien over 6 years ago

    I'm a minority, but I love CDs. When I have the money I buy them.
  • jweijde over 6 years ago

    little_alien
    I'm a minority, but I love CDs. When I have the money I buy them.

    I do too. CDs just offer a much greater experience then digital files.
    I don't really understand why people are so negative. Sure the market isn't what it used to be, but to say the CD is dead? I don't think so.
    Davidsen
    The CD format is becoming the vinyl of the 1990s.

    Well, vinyl sales seem to be on the rise again so...
    Davidsen
    I have not sold a single cd on ebay.

    Ebay is still very US/UK oriented. My experience is that when you are not living in one of those countries, it's much harder to sell stuff there. Plus, there's a lot of potential competition there.
    Davidsen
    it also holds for new CD on Amazon for instance.

    I occasionally buy a cd at Amazon, but in general I don't like buying cds there because of the way US releases are sealed (they use adhesive tape which is not easy to remove) and those ugly FBI warnings.
    I don't really get that, they want people to buy more cds so they should make their product more attractive. Instead, they put an ugly warning on it.
    Davidsen
    Even "rare" CD no longer sell for high prices.

    Maybe that's just because people have come to realize those items are overprized?
  • little_alien over 6 years ago

    jweijde
    I do too. CDs just offer a much greater experience then digital files.
    I don't really understand why people are so negative. Sure the market isn't what it used to be, but to say the CD is dead? I don't think so.

    It's quite dead to most people, allowing me to get those releases I have been looking for in vain for ages ;) I must admit that I often rip CDs to a file format and play that. I do like the secure feeling of always having a solid physical backup. And a big rack full of music (be it vinyl or CD) still looks more impressive than an iPod in a docking station.
  • Kergillian over 6 years ago


    little_alien
    I do like the secure feeling of always having a solid physical backup.


    Agreed. And I like having the booklets in my hands to flip through.

    little_alien
    And a big rack full of music (be it vinyl or CD) still looks more impressive than an iPod in a docking station.


    Hellz yeah!
  • md over 6 years ago

    infamous31
    you're talking about over a decade of music where CDs were the only physical format

    Which decade? I wonder if I'll still be alive when it starts.
  • infamous31 over 6 years ago

    infamous31
    you're talking about over a decade of music where CDs were the only physical format


    md
    Which decade? I wonder if I'll still be alive when it starts.


    Vinyl wasn't really pressed in the 90s. Yes, some releases were pressed in limited quantities, especially in the early 90s. And dance/electronic records and hip hop singles were still pressed. But for the most part, CDs were the dominant format. I don't think that's a controversial observation...
  • md over 6 years ago

    md edited over 6 years ago
    Billions of vinyl records were pressed in the 90s. To suggest that they ought not to be included in a list of available physical audio formats is beyond ludicrous.

    infamous31
    But for the most part, CDs were the dominant format. I don't think that's a controversial observation...

    Neither is it the observation you made earlier. It's a completely different observation.
  • little_alien over 6 years ago

    I'm about to buy 10 CD-Maxi singles. Talking about dead formats :P
  • man_traic over 6 years ago


    infamous31
    Vinyl wasn't really pressed in the 90s.


    ?
  • Mr.Mystery over 6 years ago


    infamous31
    Vinyl wasn't really pressed in the 90s. Yes, some releases were pressed in limited quantities, especially in the early 90s. And dance/electronic records and hip hop singles were still pressed.

    That's a bit of a contradicting statement, isn't it?
  • infamous31 over 6 years ago

    md
    Billions of vinyl records were pressed in the 90s. To suggest that they ought not to be included in a list of available physical audio formats is beyond ludicrous.


    Mr.Mystery
    That's a bit of a contradicting statement, isn't it?


    Oh lordy.

    Dude, I'm on Discogs. I KNOW that vinyl was pressed in the 90s! You guys are so uptight...

    I was just making conversation. I guess I need to quantify everything I type on the Forum with links to articles, quotes from books, et cetera...
  • Mr.Mystery over 6 years ago


    infamous31
    You guys are so uptight...

    Yes, we are the uptight ones. [Insert smiley here.]
  • nerdfly over 6 years ago


    little_alien
    I'm about to buy 10 CD-Maxi singles.


    ***BLATANT PITCH***

    40% off if you buy from me;)
  • md over 6 years ago

    infamous31
    Dude, I'm on Discogs. I KNOW that vinyl was pressed in the 90s! You guys are so uptight...

    I was just making conversation. I guess I need to quantify everything I type on the Forum with links to articles, quotes from books, et cetera...

    OK, so you post something that is completely and obviously untrue (and that you now say you know is untrue). Then when you are questioned on it you post another untrue statement and falsely qualify it with something that has a totally different meaning. Then when you're questioned on the further nonsense and the non-sequitur, you were just making conversation and it's other people who are at fault?

    Is that how your conversations usually go?
  • Starshiptrooper over 6 years ago

    jweijde
    Maybe that's just because people have come to realize those items are overprized?

    Well, the CD's and maxi-CD's I'm still after are very expensive - here, on Ebay and also Gemm (although I haven't used that site for years now, same sellers anyway).
    Last month I was watching 3 maxi-CD's on Ebay and they all went for €50 and more! Needless to say I'm not willing to spend that much money on CD's...unless it was the very last item I was looking for.

    Just because most of the MP-stock on discogs is vinyl doesn't mean CD is "dead".
    Many people hate MP3 and want the physical CD format and since most of it is OOP it's becoming more and more sought-after.

    So you want to sell me your CD's? Fine, just don't expect me to fork out a small fortune.
    I'm here to extend/complete my collection, not to go broke.
    I've seen sellers increasing their price as soon as more people add the item to their wantlist.
    Old-fashioned greed, which is understandable I guess.
    Just ask yourself the question how eager you are to get rid of your stock.

    Best Of ThisOrThat Year, filled with radio edits of ex-chart hits are indeed worthless IMO.
  • infamous31 over 6 years ago

    md
    OK, so you post something that is completely and obviously untrue (and that you now say you know is untrue). Then when you are questioned on it you post another untrue statement and falsely qualify it with something that has a totally different meaning. Then when you're questioned on the further nonsense and the non-sequitur, you were just making conversation and it's other people who are at fault?

    Is that how your conversations usually go?


    Actually, I'm right and I was trying to be nice.
  • md over 6 years ago

    What the fuck are you talking about? You couldn't be more wrong. Music was available on multiple physical formats during the 90s (CD, vinyl, minidisc and cassette are a few that spring to mind, although there were probably others. This is beyond argument and completely contradicts and invalidates your original point: "a decade of music where CDs were the only physical format". No such decade (or any other period of time) has ever happened.

    Then you tried to justify it by making a correct (but totally different and therefore irrelevant) statement, that CDs were the dominant format. That's true but has nothing to do with what you originally said.

    Be as nice as you like, your point was still 100% incorrect in every conceivable sense.
  • stylus80 over 6 years ago

    The CD format will always be my choice of format.

    Long live the compact disc :)
  • jweijde over 6 years ago

    Starshiptrooper
    Last month I was watching 3 maxi-CD's on Ebay and they all went for €50 and more!

    In an auction situation people can be easily tempted to pay more than they actually want to pay. I'm sure if you would sell it fixed price for EUR 50, people would not be so eager to buy it. But when bids start at EUR 1,00 it seems to be a different story.

  • buzz_box over 6 years ago

    rare cd's will always be wanted as it is not possible to get them elsewhere yet. try to search for some rare things to download, its just impossible. so the only choice is still to get the physical media. and most back-catalogues are mostly not digital as well, because the demand is not that big.

    also a lot of stuff is wanted not BECAUSE of the music but instead of a special packaging of the media. the look and feel makes them interesting, thats something a digital download cannot compensate for.
  • narcoticevil over 6 years ago

    narcoticevil edited over 6 years ago
    As alot of people have said, its all about whats on the CD's.

    I hate to think that CDs are to die out....because MP3's maybe Hip...but i find them expensive* and their quality is just as bad as a Cassette as times or even worse (people who rip at 96kbps should be shot). Also you dont get the beautiful artwork or the interesting CD designs etc with MP3's...sometimes (once again) i hate the Germans.

    Although, if the stupid ass music industry stop worrying about freakin illegal downloading for once and how much money they are loosing (boo hoo to them)...then maybe they should invest in making future albums in MP3-CD format or even better get that lovely new technology that is DVD-Audio out there....because that stuff will sound much better than CD, technically almost by 3x.

    *for example i pick up compilations at stupid prices, like the Now Thats What I Call Music Series...purely because to buy say the 20 tracks on the CD i like from iTunes it would cost...(calculating) £15.80...where as i can buy that exact album in near mint condition for a quid or less.

    [Edit]
    Oh yes i just remembered, if you live in the United Kingdom then there is this place where you can send your CD's for them to be recylced, better than them going in a landfill...i do it now with those freebie CDs you get with the newspaper, collect and recycle.
  • djdom1uk over 6 years ago

    djdom1uk edited over 6 years ago
    You can check if the CDs you have are wanted by typing in the cat# on the back of the CD/Inlay. Then, you can check how much people are selling their copys for - and then decide if it is worth listing them or not.

    However, even if there is no-one with a particular CD in their want-list - it does not mean that someone will not buy it :0)

    I think that it depends on the type of CD you are selling, genre, format, etc.

    Record companys have (mostly) stopped pressing CD singles I have heard, so their rarity is bound to increase over time.

    If you have too many to list, or not enough time you could always sell them in a job lot on eBay - as there is no facilty to do that here at the moment.

    I am not sure if selling on Amazon (due to the high fees) is very practicle and you can only sell the titles already listed in their database.

    The sellers who list CDs at 1p can do this because of the p&p allowance is higher than the cost of the actual p&p, and big sellers also get a discount on postage from the Royal Mail.

    I went for a job at a local book firm (that sells via Amazon's marketplace) and they explained this to me in the interview - they sell new items ordered direct from the publishers!

    So those selling CDs at such low prices must get them for pennies, or they just want to get rid of common titles asap.

    Good luck with which ever website you choose!
  • ROBDOLPHIN66 over 6 years ago


    narcoticevil
    in the United Kingdom then there is this place where you can send your CD's for them to be recylced, better than them going in a landfill...i do it now with those freebie CDs you get with the newspaper, collect and recycle.


    Where can you send them?
  • djdom1uk over 6 years ago

    There are several high street stores that will accept your unwanted CDs, and they are able to sell them and raise money for charity :0)

    Although some, such as Oxfam (depending on the store) will not accept promo CDs (newspaper/magazine freebies) because they are not allowed to sell them (according to the manager at the shop nearest me).

    A good way to down-size your stock/collection if you need some space or whatever without incurring any fees or hassle with packing/posting/etc.!
  • narcoticevil over 6 years ago

    Polymer-Reprocessors, Reeds Lane, Moreton, Wirral, CH46 1DW

    They also take DVD's.

    Google CD Recycling, theres lots of websites listing helpful information etc. I hear there's also one in London

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