Front Line Assembly ‎– The Initial Command

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Tracklist

The State
Insanity Lurks Nearby
Casualties
Ausgang Zum Himmel
Nine Times
Black March
No Control
Slaughter House

Versions (13)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
KK001, KK 001 Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(LP, Album) KK Records, KK Records KK001, KK 001 Belgium 1987 Sell This Version
KK 006 Frontline Assembly* The Initial Command(CD, Album) KK Records KK 006 Belgium 1987 Sell This Version
KK 006 Frontline Assembly* The Initial Command(CD, Album) KK Records KK 006 Belgium 1987 Sell This Version
KK 006 Frontline Assembly* The Initial Command(CD, Album) KK Records KK 006 Belgium 1987 Sell This Version
A-187 Frontline Assembly* The Initial Command(Cass, Album, RE, Chr) ROIR A-187 US 1990 Sell This Version
TMD 9175 Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(CD, Album, RE) Third Mind Records TMD 9175 US 1992 Sell This Version
CLP 0062-2 Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(CD, Album, RE) Cleopatra CLP 0062-2 US 1997 Sell This Version
CD ZOT 189 Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(CD, Album, RE, Dig) Zoth Ommog CD ZOT 189 Germany 1997 Sell This Version
none Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(10xFile, AIFF, Album, RE, RM) Cleopatra none US 2021
CLO 2420 Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(CD, Album, RE, RM) Cleopatra CLO 2420 US 2021 Sell This Version
CLO 2420 Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(LP, Album, Ltd, RE, RM, Blu) Cleopatra CLO 2420 US 2021 Sell This Version
CLO 2420 Front Line Assembly The Initial Command(LP, Album, Ltd, RE, RM, Red) Cleopatra CLO 2420 US 2021 Sell This Version
KK 006 Frontline Assembly* The Initial Command(CD, Album, RE) KK Records KK 006 Belgium Unknown Sell This Version

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anthony67

anthony67

April 28, 2020
referencing The Initial Command, LP, Album, KK001, KK 001
First heard Nine Times on a 10" sampler and was immediately hooked. The initial Command is a primitive dark EBM masterpiece that has stood the test of time, even the heavy KK vinyl release seemed to have a weight that other similar EBM releases lacked.
Butterman

Butterman

February 5, 2019
referencing The Initial Command, LP, Album, KK001, KK 001
I will never forget my « initial » introduction to F.L.A.; my best friend at the time came back from Dutchy’s record store (R.I.P.; was an underground institution in Montreal, semi-similarly as Bunker records) and being a “rental” member (one could rent out records and tapes for a week’s time) came back with this LP, after we had both stumbled upon “No Control” from an underground radio show at the time.

We both were stunned at this “new sound” we hadn’t been exposed to. We thought Skinny Puppy and Front 242 were “the sh*t” in terms of cold industrial music (we were still novices back in those days), and weren’t ready for this record, which to this day remains a testament to this period in time. Never before had we heard so coldly calculated machinic maddening repetition with such a drive and fervor; this was the purest form of “industrial” (or so we thought) - music seemingly designed to induce unease and a perpetual sence of anxiousness and dread. And even today, whenever I re-visit this album, an uncanny sensation of stress envelops me, reminding me of those early days of pre-dancefloor EBM assault.

“The Initial Command” is a serious must listen to any fan of the band, at the very least to hear where they came from. With “Total Terror 1 + 2” readily available, we can more easily hear the genesis of the post-Puppy Leeb, and even elements from those archival collections can be heard on this album. Although the general sound of F.L.A. would slowly mutate with each subsequent album released afterwards, it is still important to understand where they came from and the other directions the project itself could have explored instead of what they chose to focus on.

Not for everyone as this early entry in the band’s repertoire may be misunderstood as a necessary birth pain, to some of us it remains, alongside the follow-up “State Of Mind”, one of the most representative acheivements of a band just starting off on their long journey. I personnaly recommend it hands down and would still consider this a great industrial album from start to finish.
TheProjectedMan

TheProjectedMan

November 11, 2018
edited over 3 years ago
referencing The Initial Command, CD, Album, RE, Dig, CD ZOT 189
I hate the bonus tracks on this release. First off, bonus tracks shouldn't go at the beginning of the album and secondly, these were recorded nearly a decade later and absolutely don't belong. Complexity sounds like it was left off of Synaesthesia's Ephemeral. Core is a much more interesting track, it's hard to place it (proto Pro-Tech before Bill said "fuck it" and just sampled every Chemical Bros song?), but it absolutely isn't from anywhere near 1987. This is the version of the album you get now though, so place those two songs in your FLA rarities & b-sides playlist instead.
Stylesy71

Stylesy71

August 31, 2018
referencing The Initial Command, LP, Album, KK001, KK 001

Nine times was the one that got me..Came across this album in 1990 (Australia)
I don't think I'll ever get sick of it either..
stahlnetz

stahlnetz

September 6, 2017
referencing The Initial Command, LP, Album, KK001, KK 001
This is THE FLA-album for me. I bought it in 1987, and I fell in love with Black March & Nine Times (they are still in rotation in my mp3-player).
DirtyDisco

DirtyDisco

September 27, 2008
referencing The Initial Command, LP, Album, KK001, KK 001
I think this is one of FLA's better albums. Very dark and deep EBM, and some of the tracks sound Cabaret Voltaire-like almost, circa 'Crackdown' only deeper (at least in my opinion). The whole album is like a trip, but side 2 is noticeably a little more dancey. It's not as hard or fast as alot of other EBM stuff, but it's really a beautiful work of industrial music. "Black March" and "No Control" sort of forecast the harder stuff they would do closer to the nineties, and I don't know if fans of their later work would like this album, but it's still worth getting just for the overall futuristic and dark tone and mood the whole album sets, if not the music itself.