Icarus (2) ‎– I Tweet The Birdy Electric

Genre:
Style:
Year:

Tracklist

Ganglion 8:36
Essen 3:52
Three False Starts 13:08
Jokun's Civet 2:22
Frogmatik 9:01
Pots & Reeds 1:54
Gnog 6:17
Mutations 4:01
Birdz Max 8:02
Tea Bell 2:24
Antz Nez 5:54

Versions (4)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
BAY 36CD Icarus (2) I Tweet The Birdy Electric(CD, Album) Leaf BAY 36CD UK 2004 Sell This Version
BAY 36V Icarus (2) I Tweet The Birdy Electric(2xLP, Album) Leaf BAY 36V UK 2004 Sell This Version
BAY 36CD Icarus (2) I Tweet The Birdy Electric(CD, Album) Leaf BAY 36CD US 2004 Sell This Version
BAY 36CDP Icarus (2) I Tweet The Birdy Electric(CD, Promo, Album) Leaf BAY 36CDP UK 2004 Sell This Version

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 2 Reviews

Add Review

scoundrel

scoundrel

April 12, 2011
referencing I Tweet The Birdy Electric, CD, Album, BAY 36CD

Much more musical and slightly less abstract that SIX SOVIET MISFITS, Icarus' album for Leaf, I TWEET THE BIRDY ELECTRIC sees them diving straight into melodic free-jazz/post-rock. So something like freepost jazzrock. "Ganglion" still has off-kilter percussion, but your attention is drawn to the topside sounds of guitar and electronic piano, even as the percussion grows more insistent and takes over by the end. "Three False Starts" has a dulcimer-like plucked strings in different iterations, coming in and out over the length of this long, meandering track. The buzz of strings in "Gnog" mutates into something melancholy and dirge-like, while "Mutations" is composed of different instrumental stabs. "Birdz Max" revels in its barely-restrained chaos, birdcalls notwithstanding. Odd and compelling.
andregurov

andregurov

April 26, 2008
referencing I Tweet The Birdy Electric, CD, Promo, Album, BAY 36CDP

This is a very different Icarus than most previous releases, one that is much less rhythmic and propulsive, and far more contemplative. Akin to free jazz in sound, yet obviously the fruit of minute attention to detail, I Tweet The Birdy Electric is difficult listening: snatches of static abound, rhythm is just as often melody as not, tracks waffle and hiss. It reminds of Squid Ink, yet the details set it apart. While Squid Ink suffered from a rather bland predictability, I Tweet offers up strokes of humor and some seemingly random noises. "Jokun's Civet" is short, sweet, and replete with electronic sounds that, well, sound like a cat! "Birdz Max" samples songbirds (and it works). "Three False Starts" should be the highlight, as it stretches along, continually developing, pulling you in ways no academic exercise can. On the whole, it feels as if Icarus' experimental searchings have ended, and now their mastery of that approach has begun.