Tomita ‎– The Planets

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℗ 1976

Versions (28)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
ARL1-1919 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album) RCA Red Seal ARL1-1919 US 1976 Sell This Version
ART1-1919 Tomita The Planets(8-Trk, Album, Quad) RCA Red Seal ART1-1919 US 1976 Sell This Version
RL 11919, ARL1 1919 Tomita, Holst* Tomita, Holst* - The Planets(LP) RCA Red Seal, RCA Red Seal RL 11919, ARL1 1919 UK 1976 Sell This Version
ARD1-1919 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album, Quad) RCA Red Seal ARD1-1919 US 1976 Sell This Version
ERQ1 1919-QF Tomita The Planets(Reel, Quad) RCA Red Seal ERQ1 1919-QF US 1976 Sell This Version
RCC-1023 Tomita The Planets(Cass, Album) RCA Red Seal RCC-1023 Japan 1977 Sell This Version
RVC-2111 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album) RCA Red Seal RVC-2111 Japan 1977 Sell This Version
RVC-2111 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album, Promo) RCA Red Seal RVC-2111 Japan 1977 Sell This Version
R4C-2066 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album, Quad) RCA Red Seal R4C-2066 Japan 1977 Sell This Version
105.4082 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album, P/Mixed) RCA Red Seal 105.4082 Brazil 1978 Sell This Version
LPVS-1675 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album) RCA LPVS-1675 Venezuela 1979 Sell This Version
RL81919 Holst*Tomita Holst*Tomita - The Planets(LP, Album, RE) RCA Red Seal RL81919 UK & Europe 1985 Sell This Version
RD81919 Tomita The Planets(CD) RCA Red Seal RD81919 Europe 1991 Sell This Version
GD60518 Tomita The Planets(CD, Album) RCA Victor GD60518 Germany 1991 Sell This Version
60518-2-RG Tomita The Planets(CD, Album, M/Print, RE) RCA Victor, BMG Classics, BMG 60518-2-RG Brazil 1991 Sell This Version
60518-2-RG Tomita The Planets(CD, Album, RE) RCA Victor 60518-2-RG US 1991 Sell This Version
BVCC-2508, 60518-2-RC Tomita The Planets(CD, Album, RE) BMG, RCA, RCA BVCC-2508, 60518-2-RC Japan 1991 Sell This Version
60518-4-RG, none Tomita The Planets(Cass, Album, RE) RCA Victor, BMG Classics 60518-4-RG, none US 1991 Sell This Version
RR-98-294-2 Tomita The Planets(CD, Album, Unofficial) Release Records (3), VAPP association RR-98-294-2 Russia 1998 Sell This Version
COAQ-15 Tomita The Planets 2003(DVD-V, Album, Multichannel) Denon COAQ-15 Japan 2003 Sell This Version
BVCC-37408, 82876-64151-2 Isao Tomita* = 冨田 勲* Isao Tomita* = 冨田 勲* - The Planets = ホルスト組曲 惑星(CD, Album, Ltd, RE, RM, Pap) BMG, RCA Red Seal BVCC-37408, 82876-64151-2 Japan 2004 Sell This Version
BVCC-37508, 88697-18482-2 Isao Tomita* = 冨田勲* Isao Tomita* = 冨田勲* - The Planets = ホルスト組曲 惑星(CD, Album, Ltd, RE, RM) BMG, RCA Red Seal BVCC-37508, 88697-18482-2 Japan 2007 Sell This Version
COGQ-51 Tomita Planets - Ultimate Edition(SACD, Hybrid, Multichannel, Album, RM) Denon COGQ-51 Japan 2011 Sell This Version
SICC 30419 Tomita The Planets(CD) RCA Red Seal SICC 30419 Japan 2016 Sell This Version
ARCD 6047, ARCD6047 Tomita The Planets(CD, Album) RCA Red Seal, RCA Red Seal ARCD 6047, ARCD6047 Australia Unknown Sell This Version
RCD1-1919 Tomita The Planets(CD, Album) RCA Red Seal RCD1-1919 US Unknown Sell This Version
ARK1-1919 Tomita The Planets(Cass, Album, RE) RCA Red Seal ARK1-1919 US Unknown Sell This Version
ARL1-1919 Tomita The Planets(LP, Album) RCA Red Seal ARL1-1919 US Unknown Sell This Version

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technopopshop

technopopshop

January 23, 2017
edited about 1 year ago
referencing Planets - Ultimate Edition, SACD, Hybrid, Multichannel, Album, RM, COGQ-51
What is going on here is Tomita is revisiting his 1976 multitrack recordings for "The Tomita Planets". Perhaps controversially (and unlike subsequent "Ultimate Edition" series albums with less drastic alterations) this one has a fairly big change. What seems to be going on is Tomita has replaced quite a bit of Mellotron (which is like analog sampling and played by the Beatles, King Crimson and was on most of Tomita's Moog albums) with 21st Century synths. Most if not all the Moog remains, the arrangement is the same, but there are some changed sounds. I think "Mars" sounds much tighter now but I also love some of the power of the original sounds, but as mentioned, pretty much all of the major lead melodies are the familiar sounds, it's more parts of the backing that have been redone. As a bonus Tomita represents the asteroids with a rather low key new piece. It's a reflective homage deeply intertwined to the original 1976 album though not on it or composed at the time. My understanding is Hideo Itokawa (1912-1999) was known as "Dr. Rocket" in Japan and was a founder of Japan's space program. He wrote the Japanese liner notes to the 1976 "The Tomita Planets" album though they were left off the international versions. Then a pretty unique real life gravitational effect has happened. Firstly in his retirement from the space program, Itokawa became an avant garde dancer in the theater, so Tomita was thrilled to actually work with Itokawa and him interpreting Tomita's music in dance. Cut to the 2000s. The Japanese space program chose to honor Itokawa by sending their Hayabusa interplanetary space probe to rendezvous and retrieve a physical sample of Asteroid 25143 Itokawa named in his honor. (Tomita also scored the 2012 movie drama about the mission "Welcome Back Hayabusa" with this theme). Tomita's final work "Dr. Copelius" was inspired by Itokawa's dream to someday dance with a hologram.
ttooyyss

ttooyyss

January 27, 2015
referencing The Planets, LP, Album, RVC-2111
I can't listen the originals since I met Tomita descritpions. I have the Planets in several versions but all are played like a machinery and emotionless compared to the Tomita versions. Tomita plays everything with exceptional expression and delivery.
TIM

TIM

April 6, 2012
referencing The Planets, LP, Album, ARL1-1919

"...He continued to release albums, of which the best known are his arrangements of classics, such as Igor Stravinsky's The Firebird, Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, and Gustav Holst's The Planets. Tomita's albums Pictures at an Exhibition (1975), The Firebird Suite (1975) and Holst: The Planets (1976) introduced a new direction that infused classical synth music with dynamic futuristic music, while abandoning the note-by-note approach previously used in synthesized classical music in favour of polyphonic sounds. Holst: The Planets in particular introduced a science fiction space theme, a connection that had rarely been explored since the 1956 film Forbidden Planet.[2] This album sparked controversy on its release, as Imogen Holst, daughter of Gustav Holst, refused permission for her father's work to be interpreted in this way. The album was withdrawn, and is, consequently, rare in its original vinyl form..."