The Rolling Stones ‎– Aftermath

Genre:
Style:
Year:
Notes:
Aftermath, released in April 1966 by Decca Records, is the fourth British studio album by the Rolling Stones. It was issued in the United States in June 1966 by London Records as the group's sixth American album. The album is considered an artistic breakthrough for the band: it is the first to consist entirely of Mick Jagger–Keith Richards compositions, while Brian Jones played a variety of instruments not usually associated with their music, including sitar, Appalachian dulcimer, marimbas and Japanese koto, as well as guitar, harmonica and keyboards, though much of the music is still rooted in Chicago electric blues. It was the first Rolling Stones album to be recorded entirely in the US, at the RCA Studios in California, and their first album released in true stereo. It is also one of the earliest rock albums to eclipse the 50-minute mark, and contains one of the earliest rock songs to eclipse the 10-minute mark ("Goin' Home").

In August 2002 both editions of Aftermath were reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records, with the UK version containing an otherwise unavailable stereo mix of "Mother's Little Helper". In the same year the US edition of Aftermath was ranked No. 109 on the List of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. The album was included in Robert Dimery's 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Tracklist

Mothers Little Helper 2:40
Stupid Girl 2:52
Lady Jane 3:06
Under My Thumb 3:20
Doncha Bother Me 2:35
Goin' Home 11:35
Flight 505 3:25
High And Dry 2:52
Out Of Time 5:15
It's Not Easy 2:35
I Am Waiting 3:10
Take It Or Leave It 2:47
Think 3:10
What To Do 2:30

Versions (10 of 327)

Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
Aftermath UK (LP, Album, RE, RM) ABKCO 882 323-1 Europe 2003
Aftermath (LP, Album, Mon) London Records PS 476 US 1966
Aftermath (LP, Album, Mono) London Records LL 3476 US 1966
Aftermath (LP, Album) Decca SKL 4786 UK 1966
Aftermath (LP, Album, Mono, Bes) London Records LL 3476 US 1966
After-Math (LP, Album, RE) Decca 6.21396 Germany
Aftermath UK (CD, Album, RE, RM) ABKCO 882 324-2 Europe 2002
Aftermath (LP, Album) London Records PS 476 US 1966
«L'âge D'or» Des Rolling Stones - Vol 5 - After-Math (LP, Album, RE) Decca 278 017 France 1973
Aftermath (LP, Album, Mono) Decca LK 4786 UK & Europe 1966

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 67 Reviews

Add Review

MagicBeliever66

MagicBeliever66

February 24, 2020
edited 24 days ago
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, PS 476

Propelled by the increasingly experimental musical explorations of guitarist Brian Jones, Aftermath is one of the Stones' vital turning points. The first album to consist entirely of Jagger/Richards originals, it redefines the boundaries of their beloved R&B. These songs are infused with arty arrangements and baroque psychedelia, yielding shadowy, slinky tracks like the delicately Elizabethan "Lady Jane" and the marimba-driven groove of "Under My Thumb.” Even the lone blues rave-up, "Goin’ Home," breaks boundaries as an unprecedented 11-minute studio jam.
clockwork_vinyl

clockwork_vinyl

January 28, 2020
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, Mono, Bes, LL 3476, LL-3476
Matrix runouts on my copy:
SIDE 1: ARL 7259+1A - BW "6-3-66" (followed by a small stamped rectangle at 6 o'clock)
SIDE 2: ARL 7259 -1B - BW "6-3-66" (followed by a small stamped rectangle at 4 o'clock)
fborrull

fborrull

November 12, 2019
edited 4 months ago
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, Ltd, RE, Vio, 018771860112
I bought my copy at The Sound of Vinyl online US store. Beautiful colored vinyl, great album which takes me back to my early teens. The pressing is great, with no noticeable surface noise. I was a little bit reluctant to buy this because I've had mixed experiences with The Sound of Vinyl, some of their pressings being really good, some of them really bad. But to be honest and fair this one is great, and for the one that was terrible (Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells), I was able to send the record back and I was given a full refund.
kalem6572

kalem6572

November 8, 2019
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, Mono, sha, LK 4786

I have a version with 1B and 5A matrix on runout.
On label it has Mirage Music above BIEM and NCB boxed, M.C.P.S. below.
LK.4786 with XARL.7209 upside down with brackets on both sides. K/T S above to left.

Would this be added as a variant?
gpms

gpms

November 7, 2019
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, Mono, Bes, LL 3476, LL-3476
my copy appears to match The Rolling Stones - Aftermath, but the matrices have an upside down V just before BW, also there is a small stamped rectangle? and a date 6-3-66 on both sides, should i add these things as a variation? meanwhile i will add it to my collection
gpms
mrbluesurf

mrbluesurf

October 11, 2019
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, Ltd, RE, Vio, 018771860112
Saying only 100 copies on HMV website. Is this correct?
pierce60

pierce60

July 16, 2019
referencing Aftermath, Cass, Album, 4 291 009
Does anyone know the year of release of this cassette?
tribriz

tribriz

May 25, 2019
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, RP, SKL.4786
My records has the variant 2 matrix runout, but on the label, both sides, the date 1966 is immediately below the name of Andrew Loog Oldham and not separated by a space, as represented by the photos included in this version.
yourczar

yourczar

April 15, 2019
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, RE, RM, PS 476, 74761
I bought my copy back in 1995 new and sealed. So it was pressed before that - sometime in the early 90's
streetmouse

streetmouse

January 17, 2019
referencing Aftermath, LP, Album, PS 476, PS-476

With the release of Aftermath The Rolling Stones stood on verge, the verge of their signature rock n’ roll sound, a sound that would carry them for years into the future, and the psychedelic scene that would for a brief moment, capture the attention of the world.

The album opens with “Paint It Black,” a hard hitting no nonsense song of a jaded man, a man who can see nothing but the dark side of life, a man who can have all he wants, but is drawn only to the blackness of his soul, something he can’t buy, can’t own, and can’t possess without letting go of all he has ... this was truly the signature song of the tragic Brian Jones.

I find this one of the most interesting of all of The Rolling Stones’ albums, I would liken it to The Beatles’ Revolver in many ways. This is The Rolling Stones' growing up, coming into their own release, as was Revolver for The Beatles. With the completion of these records, these two groups were poised to change the world with what was to follow, but it is in the looking back that brings the smile, the putting down of the finger and saying “This is where it all sprang from.”

There was some ultra fine boogie woogie on “Flight 505,” there was slide guitar like we had never heard before on “Doncha Bother Me,” the discovery of playing in those sexy low ranges as they did on “Think,” the gentle, almost a’capella “I Am Waiting,” or the nailing of Chuck Berry on “It’s Not Easy.” Brian and Keith, for all of the madness that surrounded them, were able to put their personal lives aside for a moment, or perhaps accept their personal lives, and finally smoothly mixed the styles and experimentations that each was exploring.

All of the songs were amazing, all of the songs were more then well thought out and far beyond well crafted ... they were manifested by floating to the surface from the subconscious of this righteous band, making these some of the most personal, real and heartfelt tunes of their entire career. And the proof of this can be found by reading the book by Marianne Faithful, where she manages to let you in, to let you see and feel the times of where The Rolling Stones were at, to validate this fact.

But for me, the song that best sums up this album, is the last song, “Going Home,” clocking in at eleven minutes and fifteen seconds of pure bliss. Mick has morphed into a psychedelic James Brown, with all of the swagger of a religious blood pounding experience. This is probably the only time everything the Stones knew musically was pumped into one single song. “Going Home” is played in the lower ranges, a finer bass you will never hear, with some great harp, fantastic vocals, a steady rolling beat that totally embraced R&B. The guitars seem to move in and out as if by magic (of course we now know that that was Brian), sounding for all the world like an extended jam, a jam that would be repeated on “Midnight Rambler,” one where the engineer must make a decision and find a place to fade it all out ... otherwise the song could go on forever, and for me, that wouldn’t have been a bad thing in the least.

So when I’m listing my favorite Stones’ songs, my favorite Stones’ moments, or my favorite Stones' memories ... and all is said and done ... this is the album I take with me ... EVERYWHERE.

****

Without a doubt, “Under My Thumb,” is one of the most misunderstood pop songs of all time ... and it’s been a misunderstood pop song for nearly fifty years now.

No question about it, I’m a feminist, I’ve been a feminist long before there was even a term for gender equality. I’ve always believed that women can do anything that men can do, and I’m living proof, I’ve done nearly everything that a man can do, and more than most. But I will not allow my sisters and so called feminists to lay siege to this song, when it’s more than evident that they’ve never listened to the lyrics or understood the nature and power of young men and women struggling to find their identity within the construct of a hormonal emotional cascade of wanderlust and confusion. So, to that end, I’m finally presenting you with the lyrics to this brilliant simple masterpiece, a song that parodies “The Taming Of The Shrew,” a song that rose out of the mid 60’s and has been the butt of jokes, double entendres, and misguided misperceptions can be seen for what it is.

Under my thumb
The girl who once had me down
Under my thumb
The girl who once pushed me around
It's down to me
The difference in the clothes she wears
Down to me, the change has come,
She's under my thumb
Ain't it the truth babe?
Under my thumb
The squirmin' dog who's just had her day
Under my thumb
A girl who has just changed her ways
It's down to me, yes it is
The way she does just what she's told
Down to me, the change has come
She's under my thumb
Ah, ah, say it's alright
Under my thumb
A siamese cat of a girl
Under my thumb
She's the sweetest, hmmm, pet in the world
It's down to me
The way she talks when she's spoken to
Down to me, the change has come,
She's under my thumb
Ah, take it easy babe
Yeah
It's down to me, oh yeah
The way she talks when she's spoken to
Down to me, the change has come,
She's under my thumb
Yeah, it feels alright
Under my thumb
Her eyes are just kept to herself
Under my thumb, well I
I can still look at someone else
It's down to me, oh that's what I said
The way she talks when she's spoken to
Down to me, the change has come,
She's under my thumb
Say, it's alright.
Say it's all...
Say it's all...
Take it easy babe
Take it easy babe
Feels alright
Take it, take it easy babe.

“Under My Thumb” is a song about sexual equality sensationally presented as never before, set to a brilliant dark haunting musical background filled with Wyman’s fuzzed out bass lines that are countered by Brian Jones’ marimba riffs that together, along with Jagger’s vocals, deliver a song that is one unstoppable hook. And all of this has the ability to interweave and intertwine with the listener, it has the power to make the listener feel strong, it has the power to nurture, and it has the power to level the playing field.

I’ve never been a young man, but I can tell you, I fully realized the power that I had as a young woman, that it took more courage than I can image for a boy to walk across the gym floor, with a distance that I’m sure seemed to become greater with each step he took, just to come over and ask me to dance. I also learned that it was easy to break a heart, that young men saw more in a dance than simply a dance, they saw it as a conquest. And if on occasion this dance lead to a relationship, that most girls could get the guys to do anything they wanted ... the boys would spend money on them, the boys would be polite, the boys would do anything to be taken back if we broke up, or as in this song, the girl just feels like asserting her selfish self, only to find that when the boy leaves, that she realizes he’s the one she really wanted all along. So I ask you, if a girl can play the role of calling the shots, why is it not equally justifiable, if the boy takes this pushy overly dominating woman back, to be equally demanding, to refuse to be held down, to refuse to be under her thumb. And that’s exactly what this unexpected musical sojourn was about, it was about equality; though not in the most kind fashion, for if were to actually be kind, and skilled at relationships, no one would ever be under another’s thumb.

*** The actual woman who inspired the song was Chrissie Shrimpton, not Marianne Faithful. Chrissie Shrimpton was an actress and model during the 1960’s, the girl we all wanted to look like.

Review by Jenell Kesler