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    VariousTrance 1: Sufi Dervish Rite / Tibetan Overtone Chant / Indian Dhrupad

    Tracklist

    Sadreddin Özçimi* / Necati Çelik / Arif Erdebil / Kemal KaraözPerde Kaldirma27:23
    Lamas And Monks Of Shartse Dratsang Garden MonasteryJigje Kyi Dagjug Chenmo (The Grand Self Empowerment Of Yamantaka) (Excerpt)25:38
    Ustad N. Zahiruddin Dagar* & F. Wasifuddin Dagar*Raga Mian Ki Todi24:06

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    Cover of Trance 1: Sufi Dervish Rite / Tibetan Overtone Chant / Indian Dhrupad, 1995, CDTrance 1: Sufi Dervish Rite / Tibetan Overtone Chant / Indian Dhrupad
    CD, Compilation
    Ellipsis Arts – CD 4000US1995US1995
    Recently Edited
    Cover of Trance 1: Sufi Dervish Rite / Tibetan Overtone Chant / Indian Dhrupad, 1995, CDTrance 1: Sufi Dervish Rite / Tibetan Overtone Chant / Indian Dhrupad
    CD, Compilation
    Ellipsis Arts – CD 4000US1995US1995
    New Submission
    Cover of Trance 1, 1999, CDTrance 1
    CD, Compilation
    Ellipsis Arts – CD4310US1999US1999
    New Submission
    Cover of Trance 1 (Sufi Dervish Rite / Tibetan Overtone Chant / Indian Dhrupad), , CDTrance 1 (Sufi Dervish Rite / Tibetan Overtone Chant / Indian Dhrupad)
    CD, Compilation, Repress
    Ellipsis Arts – CD 4000USUS
    New Submission

    Reviews

    justafigleaf's avatar
    justafigleaf
    Edited one month ago
    If you're looking for sounds of a soothing, palliative nature to accompany your yoga or massage sessions you should probably keep looking. However, if you're open to a primer for three traditional musical pathways to enlightenment dating back seven hundred years to the Ottoman Empire and beyond, welcome...

    1. The Mevlevi Dervishes: Born from poetry, spirituality and mysticism in the thirteenth century, the Whirling Rites of the Mevlevi were once common throughout Mediterranean Europe and Asia Minor. To the modern ear, they remain quintessentially Turkish. Although dance is integral to the experience, this track does manage to paint an aural atmosphere in lush detail. If you're ready to experience the intersection of music, math and cosmology, consider breaking out the hookah. This is an excellent place to begin.

    2. The Sacred Chants of Tibetan Buddhism: Dating back to the fifteenth century, this chordal chanting, (gyu ke), sometimes sounds like several monks singing at once. With deeply resonant vocals, punctuated by seemingly discordant instrumentation, it's alternately harmonic and cacophonous. The Grand Self-Empowerment of Yamantaka rite can provide a countermeasure for a conceptualized, limited mental state. In other words, let it degauss your mind. You may find it provides unexpected clarity.

    3. Dhrupad - Sacred Music of India: While its recognizable form dates to the middle-ages as well, Dhrupad's origins stretch all the way back to the bronze age. Defying a short explanation, Dhrupad may be summed up as composed melodies with structured rhythms combined with improvisation, resulting in a decidedly complex aural experience. Today it is considered a devotional form of Indian Classical music and might best be defined in this limited space as the vocal path to oneness with God. This track is the alap or improvisational opening section to the raga, Mian Ki Todi.

    Accompanying these three tracks, a 64 page booklet uses words and visual art to expand upon what I've woefully summarized here. Again, this is a wonderful primer for further exploration.