Floorplan ‎– Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants)

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Never Grow Old (Re-Plant)
Phobia (Re-Plant)

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dislexcya

dislexcya

December 1, 2017
referencing Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants), 12", M.PM20

This one is awesome ! I think Never Grow Old is the best techno track of 2014.
I hear some "Telex - Moskow Discow" sample in the phobia track :)
OCCIDENTAL

OCCIDENTAL

March 23, 2017
referencing Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants), 12", RP, Gre, M.PM20

I'm always concerned about colored vinyl but the copy I played and kept in my collection sounds excellent. Didn't hear any distracting noise from impurities or a high noise floor or anything unpleasant.

TWO BANGIN' FU**IN TRAX FROM THE LIVING LEGEND ROB HOOD. YOU NEED THIS RECORD.
TOMYKA5

TOMYKA5

July 7, 2016
referencing Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants), 12", M.PM20
Repress today - go get yours. Why I have to do a minimum 10 words, cmon discogs.
aidonnbrandon

aidonnbrandon

May 16, 2015
referencing Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants), 12", Bla, M.PM20
Which version is the first pressing, Black or marbled?
djegu

djegu

February 24, 2015
referencing Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants), 12", Bla, M.PM20
As i concern my copy has cracking sound making the song (A1) almost impossible to mix, so sad.
maroko

maroko

October 9, 2014
referencing Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants), 12", M.PM20
While my fellow reviewer has hit the whole part about Never Grow Old (Re-Plant) and its immense success right on the nail, and then some, I have to go against the current and say that I consider both of the versions presented here far inferior to their original counterparts. First of all, let's focus on the A side. In essence, it doesn't quite deviate from the original, in fact, I'd be cheeky enough to say that I even find the percussion tighter. The problem is in the vocal bits, as personally I find them abused. Sure, they worked wonders in the original, and they worked even better on the epochal We Magnify His Name, but this time around, my ear lobes seriously feel raped. The bit around the four minute mark onwards simply kills it for me. I literary felt like I was chased by a bunch of Christian fundamentalists and forced into a ritual of primitive baptism, or something. It's far from being a bad piece of work, as my fellow review pointed out, since the linear, precise two note synth stabs coupled with the over the top vocal extravaganza, won hungry crowds over in no time, just like in the case of the aforementioned We Magnify His Name. While I am profoundly convinced that one worked a whole lot better, Never Grow Old might just do that - never grow old! It's all a matter of perspective and taste, but personally, I'd go for the original any day of the week.

Now with Phobia we're in trouble I am afraid. Not only does the track entirely rely on those "steam train" whistling effects, which are lifted straight off his 2010 tune Living It Up, but the entire structure and the near 'over-the-edge' feel the original packed are completely lost. With those nervous breaks and multiple frantic build-ups, the original was an excessively agitated tornado of powerful percussion drops and unrestrained accumulations of raw techno energy. This version is far more moderate, and while it may display a broader sound spectrum, and its two dimensional flow and linear progression might make it sound crunchier, in the end, it just doesn't inebriate like the original cut did with all that rawness.

Both of these re-plants are adequate pieces of work, and both will fulfill their dance floor duties just fine. However, in my ears, this is a release we could have done without. The previous one, with the Mark Broom edits, was an exercise in pure techno finesse, and even the next one, where mr. Hood himself took on some classic tracks from his pioneering EP, "Protein Valve", and decided to give them a modern brush-up, was a spot on release. This one, however, probably would have sat much better with me if I wasn't playing out the amazing originals for about a year at the time this one hit the shelves. On its own, this is a strong Hood two tracker with enough punch to make dance floor swing any which way he wants. That said, in my opinion, Phobia should not have been touched. Never.
restless

restless

September 20, 2014
edited over 4 years ago
referencing Never Grow Old / Phobia (Re-Plants), 12", M.PM20
"Never Grow Old (Re-Plant)" is probably the biggest techno anthem of 2014, if you haven't heard it you haven't been out this year, simple as. It made a crossover through all styles of techno-friendly DJs and was a major play at all key summer festivals (in Europe anyway), almost to the point of saturation, (- but doubtful to be reached - how could one be tired of such a phenomenally tight gospel-techno lesson).
The whole thing leading to one single question (as summarized in the track title, including the "Re-Plant" part) : aren't we living a sort of golden period of techno right now, if such a pure, sharp, uplifting and above all spiritual jewel, produced by one of the most consistent, upright and uncompromising legends of the game for 20+ years, is considered track of the year by many and gets all the hordes of kids crazy cheering every time?
I guess the answer lies in the question.