John Coltrane ‎– Coltrane Plays The Blues

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Versions (72)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono) Atlantic 1382 US 1962 Sell This Version
332056 Coltrane* Coltrane Joue Le Blues(LP, Album, Mono) Atlantic 332056 France 1962 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues (LP, Album, Lam) Atlantic 1382 Italy 1962 Sell This Version
SD 1382, 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album) Atlantic, Atlantic SD 1382, 1382 US 1962 Sell This Version
SH-K 8017 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album) London Atlantic SH-K 8017 UK 1962 Sell This Version
HA-K 8017, HAK.8017 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono) London Records, London Records, London Atlantic, London Atlantic HA-K 8017, HAK.8017 UK 1962 Sell This Version
AT. 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono) Atlantic AT. 1382 Canada 1962 Sell This Version
HA-K 8017, HAK.8017 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono) London Atlantic, London Atlantic HA-K 8017, HAK.8017 UK 1962 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono, Promo) Atlantic 1382 US 1962 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono, RP) Atlantic 1382 US 1962 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono, RP) Atlantic 1382 US 1962 Sell This Version
SD 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic SD 1382 US 1962 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RP) Atlantic 1382 US 1962 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album) Atlantic 1382 US 1966 Sell This Version
SD 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono) Atlantic SD 1382 US 1966 Sell This Version
1382, ATL-LP 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic, Atlantic 1382, ATL-LP 1382 Germany 1966 Sell This Version
ATL LP 09051, 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Lam) Atlantic, Atlantic ATL LP 09051, 1382 Italy 1967 Sell This Version
P-6068A, ATLANTIC 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic, Atlantic P-6068A, ATLANTIC 1382 Japan 1972 Sell This Version
14.071 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Dlx, RE) Atlantic 14.071 Argentina 1973 Sell This Version
P-7504A John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic P-7504A Japan 1976 Sell This Version
30XD-1007 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Atlantic Jazz 30XD-1007 Japan 1988 Sell This Version
1382-2 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Atlantic Jazz 1382-2 US 1989 Sell This Version
CD 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Atlantic Jazz CD 1382 Canada 1989 Sell This Version
AMCY-1005 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Atlantic Jazz AMCY-1005 Japan 1990 Sell This Version
81351 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(Cass, Album, Cla) Magnasound 81351 India 1995 Sell This Version
NG 0114 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, Unofficial) M&A Group, Nord Group NG 0114 Russia 1997 Sell This Version
R2 79966, D 136263 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, Club, RE) Atlantic Jazz, Rhino Records (2), BMG Direct R2 79966, D 136263 US 2000 Sell This Version
R2 79966 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Atlantic Jazz, Rhino Records (2) R2 79966 US 2000 Sell This Version
8122-79966-2 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE, RM) Atlantic, Rhino Records (2) 8122-79966-2 Europe 2000 Sell This Version
8122-73753-2 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE, RM) Atlantic, Rhino Records (2) 8122-73753-2 UK & Europe 2004 Sell This Version
SD 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic SD 1382 UK 2005 Sell This Version
WPCR-25105 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, Ltd, Promo, RE, RM, Pap) Atlantic WPCR-25105 Japan 2006 Sell This Version
WPCR-25105 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, Ltd, RE, RM, Pap) Atlantic WPCR-25105 Japan 2006 Sell This Version
WPCR-75342 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE, RM) Atlantic WPCR-75342 Japan 2008 Sell This Version
SD 1382, R1 1382, 8122798048 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, 180) Atlantic, Rhino Vinyl, Rhino Records (2) SD 1382, R1 1382, 8122798048 Europe 2010 Sell This Version
1382, R1 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, 180) Atlantic, Rhino Vinyl 1382, R1 1382 US 2010 Sell This Version
EJC55523 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Essential Jazz Classics EJC55523 Europe 2011 Sell This Version
DOK209LP John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono, RE + CD, Album, RE) Doxy DOK209LP Europe 2011 Sell This Version
771700 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RP, 180) WaxTime 771700 Europe 2011 Sell This Version
WPCR-27304 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, Ltd, RE, RM) Atlantic WPCR-27304 Japan 2013 Sell This Version
DOL755 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono, RE) Dol DOL755 Europe 2013 Sell This Version
none John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(6xFile, FLAC, Album, RE, 24b) Rhino Atlantic none 2015
DOL755H John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, 180) DOL DOL755H Europe 2015 Sell This Version
5068596 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE, RM) Atlantic, Rhino Records (2) 5068596 2016 Sell This Version
195 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) URP Music Distributors 195 US 2016 Sell This Version
38018 John Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album) Jazz Images 38018 Europe 2016 Sell This Version
PWR 27353 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(2xCD, Album, RE) Poll Winners Records PWR 27353 Europe 2017 Sell This Version
PWR 27353 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(2xCD, Album, RE) Poll Winners Records PWR 27353 Europe 2017 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono, RE, 180) Atlantic 1382 US 2017 Sell This Version
37042 John Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Dlx, Ltd, RE, 180) Jazz Images 37042 Europe 2017 Sell This Version
ORG 195, 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(2xLP, Album, Ltd, Num, RE, RM, 180) Original Recordings Group, Atlantic ORG 195, 1382 US 2018 Sell This Version
1382 John Coltrane Blues Por Coltrane(LP, Album, Mono) Atlantic 1382 Argentina Unknown Sell This Version
1382-2, D 116389 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, Club) Atlantic Jazz, BMG Direct 1382-2, D 116389 US Unknown Sell This Version
1382-2 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, Club, RE) Atlantic Jazz 1382-2 US Unknown Sell This Version
4670001543132 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Никитин, Atlantic Jazz 4670001543132 Russia Unknown Sell This Version
7567-81351-2, 7567-81351-2 YG John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Atlantic Jazz, Atlantic Jazz 7567-81351-2, 7567-81351-2 YG Europe Unknown Sell This Version
7567-81351-2, 7567-81351-2 YG John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE) Atlantic Jazz, Atlantic Jazz 7567-81351-2, 7567-81351-2 YG Europe Unknown Sell This Version
1382-2 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE, RP) Atlantic Jazz 1382-2 US Unknown Sell This Version
152 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(CD, Album, RE, Unofficial) Not On Label (John Coltrane) 152 Russia Unknown Sell This Version
CS 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(Cass, Album, RE) Atlantic CS 1382 US Unknown Sell This Version
ATLANTIC 1382, 1382, ATL-LP 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album) Atlantic, Atlantic, Atlantic ATLANTIC 1382, 1382, ATL-LP 1382 Germany Unknown Sell This Version
ATLANTIC 1382, 1382, ATL-LP 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album) Atlantic, Atlantic, Atlantic ATLANTIC 1382, 1382, ATL-LP 1382 Germany Unknown Sell This Version
ATLANTIC 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, Mono) Atlantic ATLANTIC 1382 Germany Unknown Sell This Version
40 288 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic 40 288 France Unknown Sell This Version
SD 1382, 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic, Atlantic SD 1382, 1382 US Unknown Sell This Version
1382, SD 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic, Atlantic 1382, SD 1382 US Unknown Sell This Version
40 288 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE) Atlantic 40 288 France Unknown Sell This Version
SD 1382, 8122798048 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, 180) Atlantic, Rhino Vinyl SD 1382, 8122798048 Europe Unknown Sell This Version
1382, SD 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, PR ) Atlantic, Atlantic 1382, SD 1382 US Unknown Sell This Version
SD 1382, 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, PR ) Atlantic, Atlantic SD 1382, 1382 US Unknown Sell This Version
SD 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, PR ) Atlantic SD 1382 US Unknown Sell This Version
SD 1382, 1382 John Coltrane Coltrane Plays The Blues(LP, Album, RE, SP ) Atlantic, Atlantic SD 1382, 1382 US Unknown Sell This Version

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streetmouse

streetmouse

November 13, 2018
edited 3 months ago
referencing Coltrane Plays The Blues, LP, Album, Mono, 1382

Please indulge me … once upon a time, back when there was no such thing as stereo, there were a group of artists and engineers who knew how to setup a recording space that would bring forth the music as we actually heard it. It’s important to understand that while we can hear stereo effects, we do not hear in stereo. Of course, this topic has been debated at length, so you’re gonna have to decide which side of the fence you decide to live on. Me? I’m on the mono side, and to hear John Coltrane's album in any other fashion is to do yourself an injustice.

The issue of how we perceive mono and stereo sound is straight forward enough. Our brains use information from our ears to build a picture of what objects are in our vicinity, their width and position and the acoustic environment in which they reside. This is known as auditory scene analysis, an early stage of this is spectral analysis which separates out sound components at different frequencies. These components are then regrouped according to whether they belong to the same sound source. One of the methods of determining this “belongingness” is by comparing the levels and times of arrival of various components between the two ears to determine whether they come from the same place. Such components have a stronger sense of belongingness, or homogeneity. Grouping sounds together in the same space, as is the case with mono, is one way of “glueing” them together, making them sound like they are an integral part of a larger whole. Of course from here I would suggest the essence of a single speaker.

The Two ears, One Speaker Theory: When listening in mono there is something to bear in mind. When the same sound emanates from two loudspeakers, the two sound waves interfere with each other creating boosts of sound at some frequencies and reductions at the ears, leading to a subtle but undesirable change in the spectrum of sound. With just one speaker, there is just one wave and so there is no interference (assuming that we ignore the effects of reflections of that wave from walls and other surfaces in the room). So, by all means enjoy the different quality of sound in mono mixes, along with the different approaches taken in those mixes, but if you are going to have only one channel you really ought to have only one speaker as well.

The music presented on this outing by John Coltrane was designed to wash over you, sonically equal on both speakers (though as I've suggested, a single center speaker might just be better), a full rich and deep sound, one where the instruments blend and ebb together as they would in a live setting. What you hear encompasses the full listening space … you don’t hear the drums on the right, or the horns on the left, and then have those horns fade into the drums as on a stereo pressing. Mono sound is a collective, and until you’ve experience it, you haven’t really heard or understood it. I could say the same for the Beatles music, all of which was recorded in mono. Stereo is an effect, a studio trick, a gimmick, as is surround sound, fun for a few minutes, but not nearly as satisfying as a brilliant mono mix. No, you can not achieve that mono mix by simply pushing the mono button on your amplifier, that in and of itself is a gimmick, only to be used when listening to mono recordings.

Original pressings are not that expensive, and the new pressings from Rhino have been taken from the original lacquers, so they sound brilliant with the new and improved technology for cutting and pressing a record. Find a mono pressing just once and you’ll find that we’re neighbors on the same side of the fence.

Review by Jenell Kesler
streetmouse

streetmouse

October 22, 2018
edited 2 months ago
referencing Coltrane Plays The Blues, LP, Album, Mono, RE, 180, 1382

Most women adored the beauty salons that dotted the landscape of all communities during the late 1950’s and 60’s. I on the other hand hated them … they were bright, usually awash in the colour pink, industrially loud with the smell of hair cooking under dryers, housewives of varying sorts decked out in unidentifiable animal patterned gowns snapping gum with lips that matched the colour of their painted nails and laughingly complaining about their kids, their husbands, or anything else that passed though their minds as a single speaker radio struggled to maintain a high volume, while crackling under the strain.

I on the other hand loved to go to the barbershop with my uncle and grandfather when they got their hair cut in the city, in a hole in the wall, a narrow storefront that was restrained, filled with with a heavier more luscious smoke, comfortable chairs and big magazines, girly ones which were kept in the back, though I did manage to slip one between the pages of the coffee table rag LIFE while listening to the deep voices of men laugh with a casual sense of purpose and speak of things that seemed important … but most important and fascinating to this young woman was the elegant silver stereo perched on a wall shelf with all of its dials and knobs, from which cool jazz spilling out over the working space as a disembodied voice would venture, ”This is WDAS in Philadelphia, your jazz source, there’s no where else you’ve gotta go, ‘cause we’re gonna spin a bit of wax, ‘John Coltrane Plays The Blues’, and you’re not going to want to miss that, oh no you’re not.”

Yes, I was eleven when I first heard that ‘piece of wax’, I was eleven and got my first haircut in a men’s barbershop, a short sort of pre-Beatles bob that road well with my black turtleneck sweater, and of course earned my uncle and grandfather the consternation of my mother, though with the album Coltrane Plays the Blues in mono, graciously handed to me by Mr. Pep the barber, while saying “Most young ladies like yourself seem to dig the more popular music.” I was eleven when I decided that I never wanted to leave that church of all things jazz and the smell of Pinaud Clubman talcum powder, which like John Coltrane, I still reach for today. But I digress …

Rising out of the sessions for My Favorite Things was this annunciation, and while not the blues of John Mayall or BB King, this is an enchanting smokey and highly infectious album of the blues as John Coltrane envisioned them, and the beginning of his outings with McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones, along with his longtime partner Steve Davis, where this quartet spoke directly to me, reach out from the speakers, grabbed my soul and has never let go. This is by no means the first or last blues Coltrane would play, and if you tune your ears just right, you’re gonna hear blues’ vibes lacing much of his material. This is an album that time and time again surfaces in jazz discussions by Neil Tesser, the intellectual force behind The Playboy Guide To Jazz and other assorted publications, where people like myself, years later, continually find something new within these grooves, grooves that have been worn so smooth on my original mono copy that I often wonder if I’m hearing actual music anymore, or merely a hazy memory.

To that end, Rhino has done a suburb job of remastering this album onto 180 gram vinyl from the original analog masters, with lacquers cut by Bernie Gundman with love and consideration for the times from which the bit of wax arose, keeping in place all of the smooth dreams that have been washing over me for the last 60 years. Rhino has not only kept the music alive, they kept the package alive with both original and new liner notes that nearly allow me to hear this gem again for the very first time. These six earthbound tracks, recorded during a single day in a mono studio would go on to become the album of the year in 1962, and then the stuff of legend.

Hearing this production on vinyl is essentially important, and even more-so, hearing it with all of it’s glorious mono tonalities is even more essential, as mono was not simply about a single speaker, it was about setting up a recording space, where instruments didn’t step on each other, where there was an actual infusion, an inner-lacing of sound that ebbed and flowed, swirled and filtered though all that was going on, creating a sound that had ethereal mass and weight that fills and defines a listening space as only mono is capable of.

All of that being said, the reason to find your way to this release is the ability modern technology has to revitalize the sound that was lacking during the summer of 1961, all while managing to relay that sound as it would have been, if it could have been done as the world stepped in a new decade of change and inspiration … a decade that would be defined by John Coltrane and those like this.

When I returned to the barbershop with my uncle the next month, Mr. Pep insisted that I give a full accounting of the record, which I stood and did, where for nearly five minutes the snipping of scissors ceased: Opening the album is "Blues To Elvin, presented with a near gospel piano, which leads into Coltrane on tenor in one of his most basic blues solos, much in line with what he was doing in the late 50's, fused with an occasional use of harmonicas, all of which define this number alone as being more meaningful and filled with more credentials than most blues musicians are capable of. "Blues To Bechet" is played on a soprano saxophone, accompanied only by bass and drums, and for me, was one of the album's highlights. It's a haunting number played out in a traditional style, though that simple structure has Coltrane's hand all over it. Certainly contemporary, "Blues To You" is delivered on his tenor, without piano, weaving together simple but proficient harmonies, almost dancing with Elvin Jones. Mr. Peps stopped me there, waving his scissors in the air, and when all was said and done, as I was sitting there swinging my feet that wouldn’t quite touch the floor, Mr. Peps said, “You and your uncle come back at closing time, we got’s some other sides here you might wanna dust off.”

Review by Jenell Kesler
dlgale1974

dlgale1974

March 12, 2015
edited over 3 years ago
referencing Coltrane Plays The Blues, CD, Album, RE, RM, 8122-79966-2

I love this selection. Compiled from the "My Favourite Things" sessions, this was put together and released by Atlantic a couple of years later, once Coltrane had moved to Impulse. There's some powerful stuff on here, "Mr Knight", "Mr Day", "Blues to Elvin", "Blues to Bechet", no duds, all good, the packaging's great and the alternate takes are also very good quality.
pckiller2005

pckiller2005

July 26, 2013
referencing Coltrane Plays The Blues, LP, Album, RE, SD 1382
Not sure that it is mono. STEREO appears on front and back covers.
lperyer

lperyer

October 14, 2011
referencing Coltrane Plays The Blues, LP, Album, SD 1382, 1382
Here is yet another record Atlantic culled from the same three days' worth of sessions which yielded My Favorite Things. October 21, 24 and 26, 1960 would ultimately give us upwards of 25 commercially released tracks.

Like all of the other albums released from these dates except the aforementioned My Favorite Things, Coltrane Plays The Blues was released after Coltrane had left Atlantic for Impulse. It is fair to argue that if opportunism was the motivation for the releases, there was no barrel scratching. The majority of these cuts were well worth making available.

The curating on this release in particular is quite impressive. Stylistically, the tracks fit very nicely and it is hard to imagine them being simply interchanged with those from the other albums resulting from these dates.

The period from 1959 - 1961 is one of Coltrane's most intriguing. It saw him break for good with Miles Davis, establish the initial incarnation of his own classic quartet, write some of his most interesting and enduring compositions and expand past the horizons of hard bop, going deep into a more modal, spiritual jazz - all while having some of his greatest commercial success.
ptheodor

ptheodor

July 31, 2010
edited over 8 years ago
referencing Coltrane Plays The Blues, CD, Album, RE, 1382-2
A version of this recording with the same catalogue number, but made in Germany, is packed together with versions of My favorite things (7567-81346-2) and Olé Coltrane (7567-81349-2) and distributed as John Coltrane Trilogy - Three classic albums. Barcode on the package is 81227 33102.