Ad

Release

Edit Release
New Submission

Marketplace

5 For Sale from $25.24
Ad
Ad

Statistics

  • Have:

    35
  • Want:

    75
  • Avg Rating:

    4.88 / 5
  • Ratings:

    8
  • Last Sold:

  • Lowest:

    $3.99
  • Median:

    $14.03
  • Highest:

    $59.00

Videos (19)

Edit
Ad

Poison Girl FriendShyness

Label:Columbia – COCY-75490
Format:
CD, Album
Country:Japan
Released:
Genre:Electronic, Pop
Style:J-pop

Tracklist

1Madame De Sade
2Mister Polyglot
3Pure Selfishness
4Multiple Choice
5Daddy My Dear
6Monche
7More I See
8Shyness
9Doomed Love
10The End Of History
11Nobody
Ad

Companies, etc.

Credits

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 4988001381778
  • Rights Society: JASRAC

Reviews

omission's profile picture
omission
Edited 7 months ago
This is either Poison Girl Friend's second or third album, depending on whether you count her mini album Poison Girlfriends. Anyway, though it's hard to tell since the credits for this album are sparingly notated, I'm gathering this is really more of a Momus album with most of the vocals done by Noriko. Besides him having a production credit, some of the subject matter is typical of Momus's music; his wont is to to explore perverse or deviant forms of sexuality. A lot of the lyrics are quasi-romantic, kind of a reflection on the ultimate unhealthy relationship (manipulation, coercion, selfishness, etc.) but delivered as if they're love songs and with this bizarrely humorous twist. Two key examples of this are "Mister Polyglot" and "Nobody". The former is, to say the least, suggestive, narrated, over a lively walking bassline, by a man (Simon Fisher Turner) who teaches young girls to seduct older men from a frighteningly young age, and (presumably) his student (Noriko, who seems to struggle to hit the higher notes on this track, funnily enough). The latter, "Nobody", is a Momus song about wanting to be ignored by the person one admires; it's genuinely beautiful for both Noriko's vocals and its instrumental depth — lots of reverb, choral voices, and a theremin-like synth duetting Noriko on the chorus. Comparable atmospheres are "The End of History", a real love song with frantic bleeps and a dance beat, and the trip hop-inspired title track where Momus sings (one of few times on this album) alongside some very nice (sampled) string swells and another (probably not real) upright bass melody.