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BlondieParallel Lines

Label:Chrysalis – CHR 1192
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album, Santa Maria Pressing
Country:US
Released:
Genre:Rock
Style:New Wave, Pop Rock, Disco, Punk

Tracklist

A1Hanging On The Telephone
Written-ByJack Lee (2)
2:17
A2One Way Or Another
Written-ByD. Harry*, N. Harrison*
3:31
A3Picture This
Written-ByC. Stein*, D. Harry*, J. Destri*
2:53
A4Fade Away And Radiate
GuitarRobert Fripp
Written-ByC. Stein*
3:57
A5Pretty Baby
Written-ByC. Stein*, D. Harry*
3:16
A6I Know But I Don't Know
Written-ByF. Infante*
3:53
B111:59
Written-ByJ. Destri*
3:19
B2Will Anything Happen
Written-ByJack Lee (2)
2:55
B3Sunday Girl
Written-ByChris Stein
3:01
B4Heart Of Glass
Written-ByC. Stein*, D. Harry*
3:54
B5I'm Gonna Love You Too
Written-ByMauldin*, Sullivan*, Petty*
2:03
B6Just Go Away
Written-ByD. Harry*
3:21
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Credits

Notes

Came with printed inner lyrics sleeve.

Recorded at The Record Plant, New York City. Mixed at Forum Studio, Covington, Kentucky. Mastered at MCA-Whitney Studio, Glendale, Calif.
Chrysalis Records Inc.
Made in U.S.A.
℗ & © 1978 Chrysalis Records
All songs published by Rare Blue Music, Inc./Monster Island Music (ASCAP) except:
B5 published by MPL Communications, Inc. (BMI)

Original US pressing released in 1978. "Heart Of Glass" is 3:54 minutes long, and not the disco version. Click here for second pressing with same catalog number and the disco version of "Heart Of Glass". No barcode on the cover.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Rights Society: ASCAP
  • Rights Society: BMI
  • Pressing Plant ID (In runout): S
  • Matrix / Runout (Label side A): CHR-1192-AS
  • Matrix / Runout (Label side B): CHR-1192-BS
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side A, variant 1): CHR-1192-AS-1A MCA-1 S1 SXT
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side B, variant 1): CHR-1192-BS-1A SXT MCA-1 EA S2
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side A, variant 2): CHR-1192-AS-1C MCA-2 AX 1S
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side B, variant 2): CHR-1192-BS-1C MCA-2 A5 1S
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side A, variant 3): CHR-1192-AS-1B MCA-1 A3 1S
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side B, variant 3): CHR-1192-BS-1C MCA-2 A12 1S
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side A, variant 4): CHR-1192-AS-1A MCA-1 D 7 1S
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side B, variant 4): CHR-1192-BS-1B MCA-2 A2 IS
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side A, variant 5): CHR-1192-A5-1B MCA-1 SX 3 [gull symbol] 1 S
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side B, variant 5): CHR-1192-B5-1A MCA-1 D 1 XS 1S

Other Versions (5 of 272)View All

Title (Format)LabelCat#CountryYear
Recently Edited
Parallel Lines (LP, Album)ChrysalisCHR 1192Canada1978
Recently Edited
Parallel Lines (LP, Album)ChrysalisCDL 1192UK1978
Recently Edited
Parallel Lines (LP, Album, Sunday Girl)Chrysalis6307 654Germany1978
Recently Edited
Parallel Lines (LP, Album, Limited Edition, Picture Disc, Stereo)ChrysalisCHP 5001US1978
Recently Edited
Parallel Lines (LP, Album)Chrysalis, Chrysalis51-1192, 51 1192Europe1978

Reviews

AndrewKincaid's avatar
Doea anyone know if Parallel Lines was ever released on reel-to-reel?
lx-cyber's avatar
lx-cyber
If your Edition isnt listed
Please make a New entry.
Or If the Matrix is the Only difference, wrote the Matrix AS Other version to the Version, which is next to yours!
Wroot1's avatar
Wroot1
I have 2 separate pressings that don't feature on any of the listings, how do I attach them or notify of a different pressing?

They both appear to be 1st pressings,and exactly the same with descriptions as many of the others however, the matrix runout numbers differ as follows:

UK Chrysalis 1978 CDL 1192 Blue/White labels
Matrix Runout Numbers CDL 1192 A // 4 P16 28 and B // 4 P 12 21

Matrix Runout Numbers CDL 1192 A // 3 P 13 15 and B // P 14 5

Small details but they need adding to the inventory somewhere I guess.
ndncndln's avatar
ndncndln
Edited one year ago
Anyone else come across a pressing with "CDL 1192 A//4 P 11 3" etched on side A and
"CDL 1192 B//3 P 11 1" pn side B? Haven't seen it listed here
fbraith's avatar
fbraith
I have a copy that has Heart of Glass listed at 3:54 on the label, but actually has the disco version(5:50). The barcode is 4411-41192-1 and is on a label over the original printed barcode 7358-51192-1. Side 1 matrix is etched CHE (chr crossed out) 1192A-2E S1 SXT. Side 2 is stamped CHE 1192 BS-2A 1T. Before I create a new listing, does anyone see a listing I missed? I suspect this was as a transitional release, where they changed the version on the record, but used up the old labels.
streetmouse's avatar
streetmouse
Edited 2 years ago
Parallel Lines was a significant turning point for Blondie, though to be thoughtful, everyone should have seen this outing barreling at them like a suburban commuter train, a shift in the direction of more new wave pop oriented material, defined by a stylish blend of disco and radio friendly numbers that radiated with swirling synths, Chic induced guitar riffs, along with a relentless beat (drum machine) that stood in stark contrast to the nearly honey dripping sweetness of Deborah Harry’s vocals.

To be sure, Parallel Lines was resoundingly melodramatic and high octane, filled with musical and lyrical hooks, titled for two parallel lines of cocaine, with the record’s sugary goodness lasting just as about as long as it took the effect of those lines to melt away, leaving one attempting to regain that initial high, yet like the white powder, the effects of the music were fragile and just as short lived, leaving one feeling overstimulated for no good reason, sinister and entirely unsatisfied. Though that said, the album was a step out of the brooding artfulness of their previous outings.

Parallel Line was sardonic by its very nature, cynically mocking, yet lacking in a focal point for that finger pointing and disdainful skeptical humor, with the album feeling as if this is was the result of Alice stepping out of the rabbit hole with a collective consciousness of ubiquity, when it fact it wasn’t; other bands sincerely tried to capture or emulate Blondie, yet were unable to achieve the central character that Blondie, beyond simply Deborah Harry, exhilaratingly brought to life.

While good and all consuming for its moment, Blondie’s time in the sun feels long passed, as does that of their contemporaries such as the Cars, a vanished landscape lacking in sure-footedness that perhaps had no reason to exist, as even the slower numbers were far too angular, feeling now like a grainy 16 mm movie slightly out focus and out of sync, entirely too nervous, where it now lives on to be broadcast via black & white satellite television as part of a historical documentary. Yes, Parallel Lines made it into my music collection, where I walked the cat backwards acquainting myself with their other releases, though in the end, it all got rather boring in short order, all flash and no substance, part of the new wave roller coaster that simply went off the rails and into oblivion, where I for one was finally glad to catch my breath, leaving this five star classic that sold over twenty million records, the best selling album of 1979, to bleach itself out of existence in the afternoon sun.

Review by Jenell Kesler
maxal's avatar
maxal
Parallel Lines has to be the best Blondie album on every level (even the cover is stunning).

Blondie started a bit punky and quickly became solid pop, keeping their sense of adventure. This album perfectly captures the transition and has strong pop with an edgy sound.

Debbie Harry was at her brazen, beautiful best. Her voice clear and loud and when I stopped to read the lyrics, I saw they were good. Fade away and Radiate.
Eno_Fan's avatar
Eno_Fan
For all the 1192s, how is one supposed to tell with a sealed copy, hype stickers and CRCs notwithstanding, whether it contains the original mix or the silly Disco job?
Moondawn's avatar
Moondawn
Yo, unlike most (all?) other versions, this Dutch original has indeed an inner with credis/ lyrics printed over a plain white background.