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Raw M.T.Raw Music Theory

Label:Wicked Bass – WB012
Format:
Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM, EP
Country:Ukraine
Released:
Genre:Electronic
Style:Techno, House

Tracklist

A1 Walkman Is Dead6:32
A2Walkman Is Dead (Greg Beato Trippinn Remix)
RemixGreg Beato
7:51
B1Sara7:03
B2Sara (Greg Beato Remix)
RemixGreg Beato
6:43
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Other Versions (1)View All

Title (Format)LabelCat#CountryYear
New Submission
Raw Music Theory (12", 33 ⅓ RPM, Test Pressing)Wicked BassWB012Ukraine2013

Reviews

djsloth's profile picture
djsloth
A repress would be sweet. Probably my favourite beato tunes.
edaltweow's profile picture
edaltweow
both those beato remixes... tears of joy and sadness and everything ever all at once.
UR-UK's profile picture
UR-UK
Repress please :)
anzorik's profile picture
anzorik
Our new release "Raw Music Theory EP" is an incredible debut for the young but very talented Italian producer Raw M.T.

The opening tune, "Walkman Is Dead" does, in fact, sound a bit like dismay over a broken piece of domestic electronics, or maybe the sound of breaking itself, with a raw torn-up bass building up and down over a melancholic SNES-like synth loop and heavy 4/4 kicks. They are later accompanied by swinging metal percs that finish off the tune in this Optical Nerve manner.

As if the original wasn't weird enough, it is backed with L.I.E.S' very own Greg Beato's remix that would easily make it into one of these fashionable screwed up mixes that everyone seems to enjoy so much these days. Keeping it so lo-fi it nearly crosses the line of DJ-unfriendliness, Greg stretches the original synths, delivering something on the unexpected-yet-welcome border of trance, speed garage and powerhouse.

On the flip, a more laidback and relaxed "Sara", possibly dedicated to a special one, takes us all the way back to the Drexciya times. Yet here everything seems like slow-motion, with already familiar melancholic synths playing less melodically on the background and occasional warm stabs peaking over a constant song of cicadas.

Greg's version of the B-side, then, plays a denial card and ignores all the melancholy and tears, cutting them up and sprinkling over a merciless abyss of overdriven kicks and oldschool hats. The tune just goes on and on, spiraling down psychotically into childhood theme park nightmares and up again. Absolute monster.