Juno Reactor ‎– Luciana

Label:
Inter-Modo ‎– INTA002CD
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

1 Lu.ci-ana 61:20

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Lu.ci-ana is printed as the track title on the insert and on the disc, but the CD spine and a promotional postcard announcing the release spell it as "Luciana".

60 minutes

Dr LX Paterson appears courtesy of Island Records Ltd.

Recorded: 9.9.99
"Imagination. Use it as a weapon."

℗ 1994 Inter-Modo Limited.
© 1994 Inter-Modo Limited.
The copyright in this sound recording and artwork is owned by Inter-Modo Limited.
Manufactured in the UK. Distributed in the UK by R™.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode (Text): 5 021904 400029
  • Barcode (Scanned): 5021904400029
  • Mould SID Code: IFPI 0451
  • Matrix / Runout: INTA002CD 10294621 04 % MADE IN U.K. BY PDO

Other Versions (2 of 2) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
MET 560 Juno Reactor Luciana(CD, Album, RE) Metropolis MET 560 US 2008 Sell This Version
M-08-0002314 Juno Reactor Luciana(CD, Album, RE) Soyuz Music M-08-0002314 Russia 2008 Sell This Version

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 4 Reviews

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ailleurs

ailleurs

July 12, 2016
edited 2 months ago

This is a very atypical Juno Reactor release, do not expect trance music here but space ambient mated with indus and dark ambient. The sole hour-long track is quite beyond words, imagine the story being told of a space ship crashed on an alien planet whose crew visits a monumental mechanical factory beyond understanding, discovering powerful, eerie, and dreadful process.
Please do not beleive the other reviewers' words, this record is not that difficult to listen to, it will appeal to most of the space and dark ambient listeners, works released by Lustmord or Naked City, or Pat Metheny's Zero Tolerance For Silence are much more challenging. I bought the CD when it came out, for years that mechanical beating loop remained ingrained in my mind, now I listen to it again, almost twenty two years later, it has not changed, it is still as mesmerizing.
Ryback

Ryback

July 15, 2009
I agree with other reviewers that this extra-dimensional album is not for everybody. Those who have listened to a fair amount of ambient music will actually find this quite accessible but if you haven't then you might not make it through the first 10 minutes of it.

Juno fans, however, will bond with it and will instantly recognize familiar elements (like the moody chords towards the end of the piece) as a proto-Bible of Dreams sound that they were working out at the time.

My first impressions from listening to it instantly brought to mind the minimalism of a Kubrick film. Imagine a sole survivor locked in the engine room of a derelict space hulk who is starting to hallucinate or is being haunted by the departed souls of the crew members; all while their grip on reality very slowly unravels. Think 2001 meets the Shining and you've got Luciana.

Now that I think about it, the samples from High Energy Protons were lifted from 2001; maybe Watkins is a big Kubrick fan?

Anyway, for being nearly 15 years old I feel it has withstood the test of time quite nicely and I highly recommend it to ambient fans new and old or to Juno fans, like myself, who let this one slip by them all these years.

As a bonus for the DJ's out there (though don't quote me on it) I estimate this out to be around 135 to 140 BPM so the right portions of the album can be used as an intro or outro to a DJ set.
Josephschembri

Josephschembri

June 29, 2006
edited over 10 years ago

It’s hard to describe Luciana.

Roughly I would define Luciana (or Lu.ci-ana) as an immensely dark and abstract ambient experiment. Why an experiment? Few would have dared to stretch such a weird piece of music for more than an hour! Imagine yourself having been transported into another dimension in a totally different alien world. Luciana would make the perfect background.

This 61 minute long track has nothing which can be called as a melody, and there is not a single kick or not even a miserable dubby bass effect. Luciana is an immensely sinister and evil piece of music which I admit it’s quite an effort to listen it to the end. Everything is so alien here. It’s true that it’s completely beat-less and that there is not a single melody which moves you, but beware – this is not music for relaxing and sipping a cup of tea! You can feel that there is something really eerie surrounding you. I guess this music would also put you in the right mood before committing something you never dared doing…..but better stop here with this last sentence for God’s sake!

Perhaps the only familiar “thing” you will hear on this song is an occasional (seemingly female) vocal. I think this should have been used more. Towards the end you will hear a male voice speaking. This happens in the last 10 minutes where there is a lot of tension building up.

Seems a very hard release to find. Had to pay fifty euro for this on eBay but I don’t regret it. I’m sure that Luciana will grow on me even if bought some twelve years later.

Totally spooky! Listen to this in total darkness – let yourself being sucked into another world from which you might never return….:0)
barticle

barticle

June 18, 2003
Luciana came out in July 1994 and was, despite the cat number, the first release from the Inter-Modo label run by The Orb's Alex Paterson (who is also credited as a "collaborator" on this album). However don't come to this release expecting the energetic dancefloor psy-trance of High Energy Protons from the same era. Luciana started out as a special project originally composed as the soundtrack to an art installation by Norma Fletcher. It consists of a single hour-long track of what I'd describe as moody, minimal, industrial ambience with occasional alien noises, weird sounds and haunting human voices washing in and out.

I think it makes great atmospheric, quite dark, slightly odd, background music but be warned that the track does have a very repetitive nature with the same recurring elements and as such might not be to everyone's taste. Back in 1994 the reviewer for one UK record shop (rather frankly!) admitted in their mail-order catalogue that he gave up on the CD after 34 minutes because he "couldn't take any more and had to stop it"!