Disco Four ‎– We're At The Party

Label:
Profile Records ‎– PRO-7016
Format:
Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:
 

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Released in a "Profile Records Giant Single" die-cut sleeve.

Info on sleeve:
©1981 Profile Records Inc. 250 West 57th Street N.Y. N.Y. 10107

Info on labels:
Protoons, Inc./Eric Matthew Music/ASCAP
An Eric Matthew Production
℗ 1982 Profile Records, Inc.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Rights Society: ASCAP

Other Versions (3 of 3) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
PRO-7016 Disco Four We're At The Party(12", TP) Profile Records PRO-7016 US 1982 Sell This Version
PRO-5016-DJ Disco Four We're At The Party(7", Promo) Profile Records PRO-5016-DJ US 1982 Sell This Version
PRO-7016-DJ Disco Four We're At The Party(12", Promo) Profile Records PRO-7016-DJ US 1982 Sell This Version

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Reviews Show All 3 Reviews

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creature130870

creature130870

March 24, 2018
Once again behind the creation of an electro gem like this (underrated) one is that man Eric Matthew, a true legend of the 80s boogie/funk/electro scene! ACE!
mjb

mjb

October 30, 2014
edited over 3 years ago

Party lyrics collide with dreamy synth pads and a melancholy, minor-key piano melody; and a sweet falsetto chorus evokes times past.

I can see how the scene wouldn't like it at the time; any record that starts out with a "do ya wanna pah-tay, do ya wanna pah-tay" would be expected to then take it up a notch and get right into a booty-shakin' assault, not loll into a 7- or 8-minute patchwork of hypnotic riffs where the disposable tag-team vocals are no more important than the instrumentation. The genre was evolving, though, and fresh ideas were in the air.

This one-of-a-kind, head-bobbin' smokers' delight from hip-hop's post-disco era should've been a trendsetter, ushering in a wave of contemplative, increasingly dubbed-out backing tracks. Instead, it was lost to the ages, overshadowed by the harder—lyrically and musically—"street" sounds that would dominate the rap for the rest of the decade. Now, though, it's clear to see how ahead of its time it was, even though nothing else to date sounds quite like it. Listen to the last minute of the vocal version and see what I mean.