Ahmed Fakroun / Belle Epoque ‎– Yo Son (Edit De Prince Language) / Bamalama (Edit De Lee Douglas)

Label:
Editions Disco ‎– ed-1977
Format:
Vinyl, 12", Unofficial Release, 45 RPM
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist Hide Credits

A Ahmed Fakroun Yo Son (Edit De Prince Language)
Edited By – Prince Language
B Belle Epoque Bamalama (Edit De Lee Douglas)
Edited By – Lee Douglas

Notes

Original artists not listed.

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 4 Reviews

Add Review

Disco_Russ

Disco_Russ

February 17, 2017

Like this a lot, wicked edit with an Arabic feel, nicely!
lemacp

lemacp

January 3, 2016
In want of this one! Who is able tot sell it tot me for a reasonable price ? Plz contact me
jsjones

jsjones

June 14, 2008
Ahmed Fakroun.Born in the Libyan city of Benghazi, he spent long periods in the UK and France in the 1970s and 1980s, recording a handful of singles and albums.
Reduced to a mere mention in specialist music encyclopedias after Libya's years of international isolation made it difficult for him to market his music to the outside world.
However, he recently came to prominence among obscurity-hungry club DJs when some of his early songs were rediscovered, re-edited and reissued anonymously.
Ahmed Fakroun looked set to make his mark in world music circles in the mid-1980s when his album Mots D'Amour, combining traditional Arab instruments and melodies with electronic music and dance rhythms, was released on the Celluloid label in France.
But then came the US aerial bombing of Libya in April 1986, followed by years of international sanctions, as evidence of terror links turned Libya's government into a pariah of the West and seriously impeded its citizens' freedom of movement.

"When I look to my press book, I found the articles stopped in 1986," he told the BBC.
"It was so difficult for me to be in two places at the same time".
"To take a plane to go from my home town to any part of the world, I had to go across the Tunisian border to Jerboa, about 700km, or take a boat to Malta overnight, then [travel] the next day to the other part of the planet. Imagine the rest of the story."

As it happened, record companies did manage to market Arabic pop to international music fans at that time, but Fakroun missed out.
Instead, all the action came from neighbouring Algeria, as Khaled, Cheb Mami and others introduced the world to the North African sound known as rai music.
And that seemed to be that, until about a year ago. Then a New York-based DJ known as Prince Language unearthed an old Ahmed Fakroun track called Soleil Soleil, re-edited it and put it out on a 12-inch single, renamed Yo Son.
"Prince Language delivers an edit of an 80s obscurity that sounds like it could have been an outtake from Talking Heads backing an Arabic R&B group," said one.
A few months later, some French DJs working under the name of Les Edits Du Golem released a 12-inch EP featuring a tune called Pyramide - in reality, a re-edited version of Fakroun's 1977 single Nisyan.
Even though neither record was authorised by Fakroun, he was grateful for the renewed exposure.
"I was very happy that these tracks are still alive in people's minds," he says.
"Thanks to those DJs from all over the world, playing and re-editing and refreshing those tracks. No, I don't mind. It's good for me to hear them in a good re-edit or mix, as long as they respect copyrights"

Amended and edited from bbc website 14/06/2008